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Armstrong 
State College 




Accreditation: Armstrong State College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, 
masters, and educational specialists degrees. 

Academic Calendar' 

Fall, 1993 



(11 weeks) 






Winter, 1994 


Spring, 1994 


Summer, 1994 




Session A 


Session B Session C Session 


(1 1 weeks) 


(11 weeks) (4 weeks) 


(4 weeks) (8 weeks) (6 weed 



Freshman Applications Due 




Aug. 23 


Dec. 10 


March 1 1 


June 1 


June 18 


Junel 


Junel 


Registration 




Sept. 13-14 


Jan. 4 


March 28 


June 20 


July 18 


June 20 


June20j 


First Day of Class 




Sept. 15 


Jan. 5 


March 29 


June 21 


July 19 


June 21 


June A 


Mid-Term 




Oct. 19 


Feb. 9 


May 2 


July 5 


July 29 


July 19 


July 1S 


Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalty 




Oct. 19 


Feb. 9 


May 2 


July 5 


July 29 


July 19 


July 1 1 


Advisement & Advance Registration 




Oct. 25-Nov. 5 


Feb. 7-18 


May 9-20 


July 18-29 




July 18-29 


July 18-1 


Last Day of Class 




Nov. 23 


March 16 


June 7 


July 15 


Aug. 11 


Aug. 15 


Aug 4 


Reading Day 




Nov. 24 


March 17 


June 8 










Final Examinations Begin 




Nov. 29 


March 18 


June 9 


July 18 


Aug. 12 


Aug 16 


Aug 5 


Final Examinations End 




Dec. 1 


March 22 


June 13 


July 18 


Aug. 12 


Aug. 17 


Aug 5 


Graduation 




Dec. 10 




June 17 










Holiday 




Nov. 25-26 


Jan. 17 


May 30 


July 4 




July 4 


July 4 


ISAT Application Deadline 

Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) 


July 2 
July 31 


Oct. 22 
Nov. 20 


Jan. 21 
Feb. 19 


April 15 
May 14 








Collegiate Placement Exam (CPE) 




Aug. 19 


Dec. 10, 16 


April 19, 30 














Sept. 3, 30 


Jan. 20 


May 10, 24 














Oct. 7, 19, 28 


Feb. 8, 22 


June 7, 18 














Nov. 6, 16,30 


Mar. 8, 17 












College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 


Oct. 7 


Jan. 20 


April 14 


June 23 


Aug. 11 






Regents' Test Application Deadline 




Oct. 5 


Jan. 25 


April 12 


June 28 








Regents' Test Administrations 




Oct. 25-26 


Feb. 14-15 


May 2-3 


July 18-19 








CHAOS Orientation Sessions (Summer 


1993) 


Contact Division of Student Affiars, 927-5271 









All dates subject to change 



1993 l 




JANUARY 
S M T W T 

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15 
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FEBRUARY 
M T W T 

12 3 4 
8 9 10 11 
15 16 17 18 
22 23 24 25 


F S 

5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


S 

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14 

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28 


MARCH 
M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 
15 16 17 18 19 20 
22 23 24 25 26 27 
29 30 31 


S M 

4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


APRIL 
T W T F S 

1 2 3 
6 7 8 9 10 
13 14 15 16 17 
20 21 22 23 24 
27 28 29 30 


MAY 
S M T W T F S 

1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


JUNE 

5 M T W T F 1 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 2t 
27 28 29 30 




JULY 
S M T W T 

4 5 6 7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 27 28 29 


F 
2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


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3 

10 
17 

24 
31 


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15 
22 
29 


AUGUST 
M T W T 

2 3 4 5 
9 10 11 12 
16 17 18 19 
23 24 25 26 
30 31 


F S 

6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


S 

5 

12 
19 
26 


SEPTEMBER 
M T W T F S 

12 3 4 
6 7 8 9 10 11 
13 14 15 16 17 18 
20 21 22 23 24 25 
27 28 29 30 


S M 

3 4 
10 11 
17 18 
24 25 
31 


OCTOBER 
T W T F S 

1 2 
5 6 7 8 9 
12 13 14 15 16 
19 20 21 22 23 
26 27 28 29 30 


NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


DECEMBER , 

S M T W T F M 
1 2 3| 

5 6 7 8 9 ifl 
12 13 14 15 16 ifl 
19 20 21 22 23 24l 
26 27 28 29 30 31 1 


I 




















19 


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JANUARY 
S M T W T 

2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 31 


F 

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14 
21 
28 


s 

1 

8 

15 
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29 


S 

6 
13 
,0 
27 


FEBRUARY 

M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
7 8 9 10 11 12 
14 15 16 17 18 19 
21 22 23 24 25 26 
28 


MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M 

3 4 
10 11 
17 18 
24 25 


APRIL 
T W T F S 

1 2 
5 6 7 8 9 
12 13 14 15 16 
19 20 21 22 23 
26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


JUNE 
S M T W T F 
1 2 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 i 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 j 




JULY 
S M T W T 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


F 
1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


s 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


s 

7 

14 
21 
28 


AUGUST 
M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 
15 16 17 18 19 20 
22 23 24 25 26 27 
29 30 31 


S 

4 
11 
18 
25 


SEPTEMBER 
M T W T F S 

1 2 3 
5 6 7 8 9 10 

12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F 

i 2 
4 5 6 7 8 9' 
11 12 13 14 15 16 
18 19 20 21 22 23 I 
25 26 27 28 29 30 ! 































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Introduction 4 

Hie College/City 9 

Student Life 17 

Admissions 23 

Financial Information 41 

Academic Policies and Information 53 

Graduate Studies 73 

School of Arts and Sciences 79 

School of Health Professions 171 

Academic Divisions 205 

Special Programs 233 

Faculty/Administration 245 

Index 261 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




As president of Armstrong State College, I am asked that question 
often — and my answer invariably depends on what prompted the 
query. 

Yes, our academic programs are excellent. This fact shows best by 
how well our graduates do once they leave us. Today's world stresses 
job readiness and career preparation and we place significant emphasis 
on assuring our graduates that they can compete with the best in the 
current job market. Our 
graduates in fields such as health 
care and computer science 
generally have multiple job offers 
to consider. Health students 
consistently post passrates that 
exceed 95 percent on national 
licensing exams and elementary 
education graduates have earned 
100 percent passrates on the 
Georgia Teacher Certification 
Test for the past seven years. 
Strong science and liberal arts 
programs produce excellent 
candidates for graduate study, 
pre-professional programs and 
today's job market. E&% 




ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Outstanding academic programs? 
Dedicated teaching faculty? 
Extensive student self-governance? 
Low student-faculty ratios? 
Close-knit, friendly atmosphere? 
A beautiful campus? 

Career-oriented educational preparation? 
Effective job placement programs? 



Is it our faculty? Many proudly say that they came to Armstrong 
because they love the stimulation of classroom teaching. We keep our 
class sizes small so students and faculty really get to know one another. 
I like seeing students and professors discussing today's lecture over a 
cup of coffee or spending time on a research project that has gone far 
beyond the classroom assignment. 

Then, too, I know that many students are very special. And we try to 
treat them in a special way. Armstrong has a commitment to encourag- 
ing student involvement in campus-wide decisions. There are not very 
many other schools that allow students to determine how to spend 
student activities fees and promote student representation on all 
campus- wide standing committees. Leadership opportunities are avail- 
able to everyone who wants to develop these skills. 

In short, I do not think that any one aspect distinguishes Armstrong 
State College from any other campus. The way all of these distinguish- 
ing factors blend together is what makes Armstrong State College what 
it is — a college that cherishes its tradition of excellence while looking 
forward to meeting the challenges of the future. 

Robert A. Burnett 
President 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 










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Degree Programs x 

2 


Associate 
Bachelor s 
Master s 




ARTS: Art 


. 










Arts 




• 








Drama/Speech 


• 










English 


• 










English 
(with Teacher Certification) 












General Studies 




• 






0) 


History 


• 






• 




History 
(with Teacher Certification) 










^ 


Music 

Music Education 

Political Science 

Political Science 
(Public Administration) 

Political Science 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Psychology 


• 








SCIENCE: Biology 


. 










Biology 
(with Teacher Certification) 












Chemistry 


• 








III 


Chemistry 
(with Teacher Certification) 










UJ 

o 


Computer Science 












Criminal Justice 


• 


• 




• 


UJ 


Criminal Justice (Corrections) 




• 






o 


Criminal Justice (Law Enforcement) 




• 






v/ 


Criminal Justice (Law Enforcement 
with Post Certification) 




• 








Mathematical Sciences 


• 










Mathematical Sciences 












(with Teacher Certification) 












Physical Sciences 










EDUCATION: Art Education 












Behavior Disorders 








• 


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'Business Education 










o 


Early Childhood Education 








• 


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O 

3 


Early Elementary Education 
Health & Physical Education 
Learning Disabilities 










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Middle School Education 

Science Education 

Social Science Education 
(History) 








• 















ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Degree Programs * 


II 111 


6 

Q 
LU 


Social Science Education 
(Political Science) 

Special Education 

Speech Correction 

Speech/Language Pathology 






• 


• 


X 

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LU 

X 


HEALTH PROFESSIONS: 

Dental Hygiene 

Dental Hygiene Education 

Health Science 

Medical Technology 

Nursing 

Radiologic Technology 

Respiratory Therapy 




• 


• 


• 


CO 

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o 

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LU 

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DC 

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MINOR CONCENTRATIONS: 
(not listed elsewhere): 

American Civilization 

Anthropology 

Botany 

Communications 

Economics 

Engineering Studies 

Film 

Foreign Language 

Historical Archaeology 

Human Biology 

International Studies 

Legal Studies 

Library Media 

Linguistics 

Mental Health 

Organizational Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Public Administration 

Public History 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Teacher Education 

Zoology 
















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ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Get started in college on the right foot 

Students often use their college catalog solely as a reference book — to look up rules, 
regulations, and requirements. Yet merely browsing through its pages can yield a 
tremendous amount of information about Armstrong State College as your academic 
home. This catalog can help you plot the best course for your years at ASC. Take time 
to take a look. 

You'll learn such facts as: 

— Armstrong supports a broad-based, pre-professional program in a variety of areas like 
business, dentistry, forestry, law, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, and veteri- 
nary medicine. 

— Engineering studies students have several options for completing much of their 
coursework at Armstrong before transferring to a regional school of engineering 

— A cooperative education program flourishes on campus 

— Evening classes are numerous 

— Off-campus classes as far away as Brunswick are available 

— A versatile schedule of non-credit, continuing education classes are offered each 
quarter. 

The many student services are also outlined. They range from career planning and 
job placement to personal counseling and academic assistance programs. 

More than 30 student organizations meet religious, Greek, professional, academic, 
and special interest needs. An active student governance program plans extensive 
student activities throughout the year. Intercollegiate and intramural sports offer 
enjoyment for spectators and participants alike. 

The current academic calendar is located on the inside front cover for your 
convenience in planning your year. A brief "Where to Write or Call" listing on the 
inside back cover may help you find the right place to get your questions answered 
quickly and accurately. The catalog is your guide to success on campus. Keep it handy 
and use it often. 

Admissions check list 

Applications cannot be considered until the college has received all required 
information. 

Freshman Students 

1. Applications for Armstrong State College (with $10 non-refundable application 
fee) 

2. Official high school transcript 

3. Official record of SAT or ACT scores (If you were graduated more than five years 
ago, appropriate placement test scores may substitute in many instances.) 

4. Certificate of Immunization 

Transfer Students 

1 . Application for Armstrong State College (with $1 non-refundable application fee) 

2. Official college transcript from each institution attended (If less than 36 quarter 
hours earned, submit high school transcript and SAT or ACT score also.) 



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10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Statement of Purpose 

Armstrong State College, a senior college in the University System of Georgia, 
provides a range of strong academic programs and an environment for intellectual 
and cultural growth in the arts and sciences, education, and health disciplines. The 
College pursues its purpose by promoting the free exchange of ideas in a variety of 
undergraduate programs leading to degrees at the Associate and Baccalaureate levels. 
In affiliation with Georgia Southern University, graduate programs of regional 
significance are offered. Recognizing its regional educational responsibilities, the 
College offers baccalaureate programs at the Brunswick Center and courses on an 
as-needed basis throughout its service area. The College provides non-degree pro- 
grams and activities through the Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education. 

Instruction 

Through instruction, the College ensures that students read and write effectively, 
and, through a strong liberal arts core curriculum, promotes the acquisition of 
knowledge in humanities, mathematics, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. 
The College prepares students in the methods of scholarly inquiry, research, and 
problem solving, and, in the process, encourages student commitment to learning and 
to physical, emotional, and social development. Furthermore, the College helps 
students to identify goals and the means of achieving them, as well as to understand 
and to respect people from diverse backgrounds and cultures. Additionally, it broad- 
ens the base of educational opportunities for students through formal and informal 
arrangements with other colleges and universities. 

Faculty, Students, and Staff 

The College recruits and retains faculty who are able teachers, supportive of its 
academic purpose, and who are professional sources of knowledge and expertise. It 
seeks, recruits, and retains students whose interests, needs, and backgrounds are 
diverse and whose records indicate a likelihood of success. It strives to create a 
community of learners in which a sense of mutual trust and respect is evident. It 
encourages and supports an active intellectual, cultural, and social life on campus. In 
addition, the College recruits and retains a well-trained staff, sensitive to the needs of 
those it serves and committed to supporting its academic purpose. 

Administration 

The administration ensures equal opportunity and access to employment, admis- 
sions, and programs and services of the College without regard to age, sex, race, 
national origin, color, religion, or physical handicap. It encourages faculty research 
and development, and provides an environment which enables faculty members to 
participate in the search for knowledge. It secures and manages funds necessary to 
maintain the College's academic programs, library, and support services. Furthermore, 
the administration provides systems of campus governance which are responsive to 
the concerns of students, faculty, staff, and the Board of Regents. And finally, it acquires 
and maintains facilities and equipment necessary to support the College. 

Community Service 

A regional resource for information and expertise, the college is responsive to the 
unique educational and community service needs of its constituency. By combining 
efforts with the community, the college designs and conducts continuing education 
programs and offers a variety of cultural and athletic events. Moreover, it liberally 
shares its physical facilities and grounds for the betterment of the academic and 
cultural life of the community. 



PROGRAMS 11 



History of the College 

Armstrong State College, a senior unit ol the i niverait) System oi Georgia 
founded in 19 15 as Armstrong [unioi ( ollege, to help meet the needs tor i ollege level 
educational opportunitiea In the community rhe college, as established by tin- c itv's 
Mayor and Aldermen* u - ,s housed in the beautiful Armstrong home, i girl to the * it) 
from the family ol George I Armstrong. Over the yean the college occupied Hvt 
additional buildings in the Forsyth Park and Monterey Square areas In i L >^>, as 
Armstrong College ol Savannah, it became a two year unit of the University System 
rhe Hoard ol Regents conferred four-year status on Armstrong in 1964 and the college 
nun od to its present 230 acre site, a gift from the Mills B. lane Foundation, in December 
ot 1965. Additional buildings joined the eight original structures as Armstrong added 

professional and graduate programs and tripled in size. 

The line Arts Center, including a 1,000 seat theatre/auditorium, the Health 
Professions Building, a new apartment style residence complex, a library wing, and 
an academic computing center are among more recent additions. 

Armstrong State College, offers over 75 academic programs and majors in the 
School of Arts and Sciences, the School of Health Professions, the Division of 
Education, and the Division of Physical Education and Athletics. 

The academic community includes approximately 4000 students and 172 full-time 
faculty members. Armstrong State College was fully accredited as a senior institution 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in December, 1968, with 
accreditation retroactive to January 1, 1968, and was last reaccredited in December 1992. 

Location 

Armstrong students find much to enjoy about living in the cosmopolitan city of 
Savannah, the major urban area (pop. 200,000) in coastal Georgia. The college's 250 acre 
campus is located in a residential area of the city which promotes a feeling of freedom 
and security on campus. 

Savannah, Georgia's founding city, has all the historic and cultural variety of a 
metropolitan city with the added advantage of the ocean at its back door. A temperate 
climate encourages outdoor activities and recreation year round. Beach and river outings 
include sailing, boating, water skiing, sunning and beachcombing. Golf, tennis, fishing 
and hunting are also popular. 

A resident symphony orchestra, dance and theatre groups, and visiting entertain- 
ment groups regularly perform at the Civic Center. Special celebrations and other 
festivals are scheduled throughout the year. 

The historic past lives in harmony with today's progress in Savannah. As a living 
laboratory for history, Savannah is unsurpassed yet the Savannah port is one of the 
busiest on the Atlantic coast. 

Community oriented leisure activities complement on-campus happenings. A 
growing NCAA intercollegiate athletic program, active intramurals, concerts, plays and 
special entertainment mean lots to do without leaving campus. 

Accreditation 

Armstrong State College has earned the following regional and special purpose 
accreditations: 
Armstrong State College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 

Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate degrees. 
Associate Degree Nursing - by the National League for Nursing for the period 

1985-1993. 
Baccalaureate Degree Nursing - by the National League for Nursing for the period 

1985-1993. 
Computer Science - bv the Computer Science Accreditation Commission for the period 

1991-1994. 



12 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Criminal Justice - by the Criminal Justice Accreditation Council. 

Dental Hygiene - by the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary 
Educational Programs for the period 1985-1994. 

Medical Technology - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation 
for the period 1990-1997. 

Music - by the National Association of Schools of Music for the period 1990-1994. 

Radiologic Technologies - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accredi- 
tation for the period 1987-1992. 

Respiratory Therapy Department - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation for the period 1987-1992. 

Teacher Education Programs - by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education for the period 1982-1991. 



Office of College Advancement 



The Office of College Advancement consists of three components: Alumni Affairs, 
Public Relations, and Development, which includes the Armstrong State College Foun- 
dation, Inc. The office works with graduates, friends, area businesses, corporations, 
foundations, and other supporters of Armstrong State College by providing a vehicle of 
communication and fundraising support. 

Alumni Affairs 

The Office of Alumni Affairs serves as a liaison between the Alumni Association, 
Armstrong State College, and graduates. The office maintains current alumni records 
and serves as a clearinghouse for Alumni Association dues, alumni scholarship dona- 
tions, and college and alumni information. Graduates receive news concerning the 
college and special events through periodic mailing originating from the office. Alumni 
Affairs is responsible for the publication of the FOCUS, the alumni information and news 
magazine. 

The Armstrong State College Alumni Association was organized in 1937 and is 
comprised of graduates and former students of Armstrong Junior College and Arm- 
strong State College. The association promotes interaction among alumni, students, 
faculty, staff, and friends of the College in order to strengthen the ties between the College 
and its supporters. Membership in the association is open to all graduates and former 
students. 

Each academic year, the association awards four full scholarships: the Arthur Gignilliat 
Entering Freshman, the Class of 1937, the Judge Grady & Sarah Dickey, and the Jules 
Rossiter Stanfield scholarships. These awards reflect the association's investment in 
Armstrong State College students. Scholarship applications are available in January for 
the following academic year's awards. Scholarship recipients are named in the spring. 

The Alumni Association recognizes persons who have made outstanding contribu- 
tions to the College and Alumni Association by presenting the Distinguished Alumni 
Award, the Outstanding Alumni Service Award, the Distinguished Citizen's Award, and 
the Outstanding Faculty Award. 

Public Relations 

The Office of Public Relations promotes the College, its activities, students, and faculty 
through interaction with media representatives. The office is responsible for external 
publications and promotions related to the college. The Office of Public Relations serves 
as the liaison between the College and media representatives and reports media activities 
to the University System of Georgia public relations representatives. 



PROGRAMS 13 



Development 

Alumm and friends can make donations In support oi t h»- c ollege oi l( ish, set unties, 
or other qualifying assets through tin- Armstrong State ( ollege Foundation, Ira 

Donations are used to respond to challenges and opportunities t»>r growth I he hinds 
pro\ IdetheC ollege with support unavailable through state app r op r iations ( lifts are also 
used to aaaist students through scholarships and other financial assistant e, support our 
outstanding teachers through faculty development awards and professorships! sponsor 
symposia and guest lecturers, enhance our library holdings and fa< ilities, and assist in 
other special projects and programs. Private support helps sustain Armstrong State 
College's tradition ot academic excellence. 

rhe A r m st r on g State College Foundation, In* is a direct support organization and the 
legal entity to receive gifts tor the college. Contributions to the Foundation, which is a 
501 (cX3) tax exempt charitable organization, are entitled to aU tax benefits autrtorized by law. 

Two- Year Degree Programs 

The following two-year degrees are offered as preparation for higher degrees in the 
liberal arts and professions or as terminal professional degrees: 
Associate oi Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice 
Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Associate of Science in Nursing 
Associate of Science in Radiologic Technologies 
Associate of Science in Respiratory Therapy 

Four-Year Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of art, drama-speech, English, history, music, political 
science, and psychology- 
Bachelor of General Studies. 

Bachelor of Health Science. 

Bachelor of Music Education. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, computer science, criminal 
justice, and mathematical sciences. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors in Early Elementary Education; Middle 
School Education; Secondary Education in the teaching fields of Biology, Business 
(cooperative arrangement with Savannah State College), Chemistry, English, Mathemat- 
ics, History, Political Science, and K-12 programs in Art, Music, and Speech Correction. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

The College is authorized to offer Teacher Education programs, preparing students 
for certification by the Georgia State Department of Education in the following areas: art, 
biology, business education, chemistry, early elementary education, English, general 
science, history, industrial arts, library media, mathematics, middle school education, 
music, physics, political science and social studies. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

(One of the Four- Year Degree Programs Must Be Pursued) 

Armstrong State College offers courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalau- 
reate programs such as business, engineering, forestry, industrial management, pharmacy, 
physical therapy, physics, etc., not offered among its degree programs, and it offers the 
pre-professional study appropriate for dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary medicine, 
and other professional fields. 



1 4 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

Qualified students seeking a bachelor of engineering degree may begin their college 
studies at Armstrong State College through the Regents Engineering Transfer Program. 
Upon successful completion of the pre-engineering curriculum, students may transfer to the 
Georgia Institute of Technology to complete the degree requirements. It is expected that 
students in this program, like other Georgia Tech graduates, will normally require four to five 
and one-half years to complete the degree requirements, depending on their pre-college 
preparation, involvement in extra-curricular activities, and engineering major. 

Dual-Degree Programs 

Armstrong State College has dual-degree programs in engineering with the Georgia 
Institute of Technology, Auburn University, Clemson University, Mississippi State 
University, and the University of Florida. Upon completion of the first three years of 
academic work at Armstrong, the student may enroll for two subsequent years at one of 
the participating schools. Upon completing the requirements of the two cooperating 
schools, the student will receive a baccalaureate degree from Armstrong State College 
and a baccalaureate degree in the chosen field of engineering from the second school. 

Dual-degree programs in other fields are also available. At the Georgia Institute of 
Technology, candidates from Armstrong State College are eligible to seek any degree 
offered in the sciences, mathematics, and management, as well as engineering. The 
Head of the Department of Chemistry and Physics is the Armstrong Coordinator of 
these dual-degree programs and should be contacted for additional information. 

A dual-degree program in forestry and environmental management with Duke 
University is available. Students complete three years of academic work at Armstrong 
State College, then enroll for two subsequent years at Duke University. Students who 
successfully complete the program receive a B.S. in biology from Armstrong State 
College and a M.S. in either forestry or environmental management from Duke 
University. The Head of the Department of Biology should be contacted for additional 
information. 

Cooperative Education Program 

In the cooperative education program students typically alternate quarters between 
college and work. This program offers students valuable practical experience as well 
as financial assistance in the form of compensation from the firms that employ them. 

Cooperative opportunities are available to students in computer science and 
engineering, but are not limited to these majors. 

Cooperative students must register for the appropriate Cooperative Education 
Program course for quarters in which they work. These courses carry no credit and 
there is no charge for registration. 

Students interested in applying for admission to the Cooperative Education program 
should contact the Co-op coordinator or Head of their major department. 

Evening Courses 

A wide selection of evening undergraduate and graduate level courses accommodate 
students who are employed during the day. Evening courses are scheduled to enable 
evening students to complete degree requirements in a variety of fields. 

Off Campus Courses and Programs 

Armstrong State College offers selected courses at off-campus sites to meet specific 
regional needs. Examples of possible locations include The Coastal Georgia Center, 
Memorial Medical Center, Hinesville public schools, etc. 



PROGRAMS 15 



The Brunswick Center 

The Brunswick Centei la .1 consortium composed of Brunswii k ( ollege, Armsta 
Slate College In Savannah, * nu ^ Georgis Southern 1 niversity lit Statesboro it was 
authorized by the Hoard ot Regents of tin- 1 niversit) System of i leorgis In Sep tem ber 
1966 and was organized tor the purpose of establishing .1 resident e i *-nt*-r tor bsx 1 alau 
reate degrees However, all three participating institutions teach courses which apply 
toward the degrees, and credil earned from any ot these colleges through the 
Brunswuk Center is accepted as residence < redil by Armstrong State ( oll< 

Degree Programs: 

The Brunswick Center otters programs of study leading to three degrees from 
Armstrong State College: 
Bachelor ot Science in Criminal Justice 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

with certification in early childhood education (K-4) or middle school education 
Bachelor of General Studies 

a broad-based general education degree with minor concentrations in business, 

history, political science, and psychology 

Criteria for Admission: 

Anyone who has completed an associate degree or its equivalent is eligible for 
admission to Brunswick Center programs and courses. Moreover, Brunswick College 
students who have sophomore standing and meet certain requirements, including 
completion of all Core Curriculum English requirements and passing the Regents 
Test, may be admitted to Brunswick Center classes taught by the senior colleges. 

Anyone who already has a baccalaureate degree also may be admitted as a 
nondegree student to take courses, particularly for teacher certification. 

Admission Procedures: 

Prospective students apply for admission to Armstrong State College and must meet 
all admission requirements for that college. The admission application process is handled 
through the Brunswick Center Office; the completed application and all transcripts of 
previous college work must be sent for preliminary processing to the Brunswick Center, 
which will then send the documents to the ASC Admissions Office. 

After Admission: 

Once admitted to Armstrong State College or either of the other consortium institu- 
tions, students are allowed to take courses offered through the Brunswick Center by all 
three institutions. The senior colleges accept all course work done through the Brunswick 
Center as residence credit. Upper level courses taken by Brunswick College students will 
be applied toward their baccalaureate degrees. 

The Director of the Brunswick Center serves as the initial advisor for all students in the 
Center. He meets with each student to outline an overall program as well as to plan a 
schedule each quarter. 

Registration for the Brunswick Center is done through the Center office at the time of 
Brunswick College registration. Students are encouraged to preregister for the next 
quarter during the specified preregistration time each quarter. 

Graduation requirements in each degree are set by Armstrong State College. The 
respective department heads and the Registrar at ASC certify each candidate for graduation. 

All Brunswick Center students have full use of the Brunswick College Library and 
other support services of Brunswick College. 

Fees: 

There is a $10 processing fee which must accompany each application for admission 



to Armstrong State College. 



16 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Tuition fees for both senior college courses and junior college courses are collected at 
the current rates set by the University System Board of Regents. Senior college students 
taking six or more quarter hours at Brunswick College also must pay student activity and 
athletic fees at this institution. Tuition fees are paid to Brunswick College. 

Financial Aid: 

Prospective students interested in seeking financial aid should make application for 
their aid through the Financial Aid Office of their home school. Financial aid application 
forms for Armstrong State College may be obtained from the Brunswick Center Office. 

General Studies 

Associate and baccalaureate programs in general studies emphasize a liberal arts 
education and allow students to acquire a broad-based background in the arts and 
sciences. These degrees are particularly attractive to students who desire the general 
intellectual growth which comes with a multi-disciplinary degree. 

Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education 

The Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education was established in 1979 to 
combine the resources of Armstrong State College's Community Services Division 
and Savannah State College's Extended Services Division. The Center operates a unified 
continuing education program dedicated to serving the people of Savannah, Chatham 
County, the State of Georgia and, for some programs, persons beyond those boundaries. 

A wide variety of programs is offered at Armstrong State College, Savannah State 
College, the Downtown Center and, when it is appropriate, at job sites, schools, commu- 
nity centers, and other locations in Savannah. Instructors are drawn from the faculties of 
both institutions, from qualified experts in the Savannah community, and from consult- 
ants throughout the region. 

On the Armstrong campus, the major community services/continuing education 
component of the college is the short-course /conference program. This unit administers 
non-degree courses, conferences, and seminars designed for area residents who do not 
wish to participate in the regular credit classes offered by the college. These activities vary 
widely - some are related to professional development, others reflect personal interests, 
while others are recreational in nature. The Registrar maintains permanent records of 
persons participating in activities that meet certain criteria. 

Regional Criminal Justice Training Center 

The Armstrong State College Regional Criminal Justice Training Center is a regional 
training site for criminal justice employees, especially those in law enforcement. The 
region consists of nineteen counties; however, training is made available to all criminal 
justice employees throughout the State of Georgia. The basic mission of the Center is to 
provide certification classes for law enforcement and jail officers. In addition, there are 
numerous advanced and specialized courses for higher certification credits. The training 
center has seven full-time staff members and a large part-time instructor cadre. 

Armstrong State/Savannah State Cross Enrollment Program 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College or at Armstrong State College taking AT 
LEAST 10 QUARTER HOURS at one institution has the privilege of taking ONE COURSE 
at the other college without paying an additional fee. A student usually would take two 
courses at the home college paying full fees and one course at the other college which would 
be transferred back to the home college; or a student with at least a "B" AVERAGE (3.0) the 
preceding quarter may take three courses at the home college, paying full fees there, and 
register at the other college for one additional course without additional cost. Students 
majoring in Business Education may take more than one course in these subject areas. 




\ 



^ t 




3 



U >J.-, 



18 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Student Life 

One of the primary aims of the educational mission at Armstrong State College is the 
total development of students. This growth process is enhanced by integrating opportu- 
nities for social, emotional, cultural, physical and spiritual development in addition to 
intellectual growth. The Division of Student Affairs is committed to providing programs 
and services which foster an educational environment which will assist students in 
achieving their full potential. The college encourages learning through involvement in 
the residence center, student government, campus organizations, intramurals, and more. 

Residence Life and Food Service 

The residence center, completed in September of 1985, consists of three buildings 
which house 64 students each. The apartment-style design encourages student interac- 
tion without a loss of privacy. Each two-bedroom suite, accommodating four students, 
has a bath and living room. All units are fully furnished, carpeted, and have unit-con- 
trolled heat and air conditioning. Phone jacks and an on-site coin laundry are added 
conveniences. Several units are equipped to accommodate students with disabilities. The 
residence complex is staffed by a head resident and resident assistants. These students are 
chosen on the basis of leadership and willingness to serve their fellow students. 

Students who live in college housing are required to participate in the 17-meal plan 
provided in the Memorial College Center. The plan includes three meals per day, 
Monday through Friday, one each on Saturday morning and Sunday evening. The 
meal plan is also available for students who do not choose to live in college housing. 

Housing applications and /or specific information should be requested from the 
Office of Admissions or the Director of Housing. 

Student Involvement 

The Orientation Program is designed to promote social and academic adjustment of 
new students and transfer students. CHAOS (Communication, Help, Advisement, 
Orientation and Service) provides freshmen with the information, services and support 
essential to a successful transition into the Armstrong community. Participants in these 
one day summer CHAOS sessions receive individual attention from student leaders and 
staff as they acquire first hand experience with academic advising, registration, campus 
facilities, student activities, college policies and procedures. The CHAOS program is a 
cooperative effort of Student Leaders and college staff. Competitive selection of student 
leaders occurs annually during Spring Quarter. Inquiries concerning CHAOS should be 
addressed to the Office of Student Affairs. An abbreviated orientation program is 
scheduled for students new to the college prior to registration Winter, Spring, and 
Summer Quarters. 

The Student Government Association is the official governing body of the students 
at Armstrong State College. It assists in formulating a program of student services and 
activities, and it strives to express the will of the majority of students and to provide 
experience in democratic living. All students are automatically members of the SGA and 
are entitled to vote in SGA elections. Qualified students may seek positions of leadership 
in the Student Government Association by running for office during the Winter elections. 

Student Clubs and Organizations provide Armstrong State College students with 
opportunities to develop leadership skills, broaden their social and professional back- 
grounds, and make a significant contribution to the college and the community. They 
reflect the natural variety of interests found in a diverse student body. 

Religious: Baptist Student Union. 

Greek: Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority and Phi Mu Sorority. 

Professional: Armstrong Biological Society, American Chemical Society, ASC Engineer- 
ing Society, Association for Computing Machinery, Data Processing Management 
Association, Georgia Association of Nursing Students, James Moore Wayne Law Club, 



STUDENT LIFE 19 



lr American Dental Hygienista Association, Musk Educaton National Conferei 
Radiologic I e< hnology Assoc katioiv Respirator) I herap) A anew lation, Studen! ( .«*« >r^;i«» 
Assih lation of Bdu< atm^ i tie I B rwitme) er s *k let) (Psyi hology), snd tin- Armstrong 
Bconomic Chib. 

Service: Armstrong Exchange Qub. 

Special interest: Armstrong Ebon) c oalition, Hand, c heerleaders, ( hums, c ollege 
Republicans rhe Armstrong fovironmental Coalition, AS{ Gospel ( hoir, as( His 
panic Sodetj Internationa] Students Assot lation, Masquers! Pirateers, \ r oi al Ensemble, 

and Women Of Worth (WOW). 

Academic Honor Societies recognize and encourage superior scholarship in many 

fields ot studs Campus chapters include: Alpha Sigma c hi (Physical Education), Beta 

Beta Beta (Biology), loel H. Hildebrand Honor Society (Chemistry), Kappa Delta PI 
(Education), Phi Alpha Theta (History), Phi Eta Sigma (Scholastic tor treshmen), Pi Mu 
Epsilon (Mathematics), Alpha Sigma Chi (Physical Education) and Sigma Theta Tau 
(ASC/GSC Nursing Honor Societ y ). 

Student Publications provide opportunities for students to develop skills in creative 
writing, reporting, photography and design. The Geechee (yearbook), Inkwell (newspa- 
per) and Calliope (literary magazine) are all produced by students under the supervision 
ot a pp ro v ed college advisors. Student Photographic Services provides employment and 
recognition tor Student photographers. All are financed primarily by the Student 
Activity Fund. 

Intramural and Recreation Offerings. The college places a high priority on its 
intramural and recreational offerings and provides a wide variety of activities 
including organized competitive sports. The physical education complex includes an 
indoor olympic-size pool, gymnasium and weight room. Outdoor facilities for tennis and 
field sports are adjacent. 

The Intercollegiate Athletics Program at Armstrong is affiliated with the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II. Athletic scholarships are available 
to support student-athletes who participate in the intercollegiate program. The men's 
athletic teams consist of basketball, baseball, tennis, and cross country. Women's teams 
include tennis, cross country, volleyball, and basketball. Cheerleaders are also spon- 
sored. Armstrong State College is affiliated with the Peach Belt Athletic Conference. 
(Armstrong State College, Augusta College, Columbus College, Francis Marion 
College, Georgia College, Kennesaw State College, Lander College, USC Aiken and 
USC Spartenburg). 

Cultural Opportunities on campus and off are an important aspect in the total 
educational process. Nationally known speakers, contemporary concerts, dances, popu- 
lar films, exhibits and performances by outstanding classical and modern artists from 
around the world complement the student's general education. These programs are 
selected and coordinated by the College Union Board. Student dramatic, choral, and 
instrumental groups, under professional direction, have established distinguished 
traditions. On-campus offerings, such as the Faculty Lecture Series, broaden knowl- 
edge and interest in a non-classroom setting. The 1,000 seat Fine Arts Auditorium 
often hosts performances by the Savannah Symphony, area arts groups, and out-of-town 
troupes, such as the National Shakespeare Company and the Vienna Choir Boys. 

Student Services 

The Counseling Center serves students who are concerned about achieving educa- 
tional and occupational goals and resolving personal problems. Counselors offer individual 
conferences to students who seek help in choosing a major, setting career goals, studying, 
and dealing with academic demands or conflict with family or friends. Counselors use 
numerous inventories to measure interest and ability, provide information to explore 
education and work opportunities, and instruct students on the use of computerized 
career and study skills development programs. In addition, counselors often are able to 
provide information about college policies, curriculum, and campus resources. 



20 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Inventories of interests, values, and abilities are available to students through 
counseling services. In addition, the following testing programs are administered by the 
counseling staff: Academic Profile, ACT: Proficiency Examination Program (PEP), 
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST), 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Major Field Achievement Test (MFAT), Medical 
College Admission Test (MC AT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), National Teacher Exami- 
nations (NTE), and Regents' Testing Program. Other testing programs about which 
information is available include the Dental Admission Test (DAT), Graduate Manage- 
ment Admission Test (GM AT), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Optometry Admission 
Testing Program, Pharmacy College Admission Test, and Veterinary Aptitude Test. 

Career Planning and Placement provides assistance with all aspects of career develop- 
ment and the job search process. Students can receive assistance with the early stages of 
career development such as selecting a major, gathering occupational information and 
investigating career paths through individualized career counseling and computerized 
career guidance techniques. The Career Planning & Placement Office also offers an 
innovative and exciting experiential career development program entitled Project Ex- 
plore. The program is designed to proactively address the needs of Armstrong State 
College students in the career exploration process. Project Explore encompasses coopera- 
tive education opportunities, as well as internship and volunteer experiences. With the 
assistance of this program, students and alumni will have the opportunity to interact with 
professionals in the working world. Part-time and full-time employment opportunities 
are coordinated by the Director of Career Planning & Placement and the office staff. 
Students closer to graduation may take advantage of one-on-one instruction and work- 
shops for resume writing, mock interviews, interviewing skills and job search strategies. 
Local, regional, and national job listings, referrals, and on-campus interview services are 
also available to students and alumni registered with the office. The Career Planning & 
Placement Office also hosts a Recruiters' Fair as well as an Education Career Day annually 
for juniors and seniors. All juniors and seniors are strongly urged to register with the 
office prior to graduation to establish a placement file and become eligible for placement 
services. 

Elderhostel is an educational adventure for older adults looking for new beginnings, 
opportunities, and challenges. Participants from all over the world travel to college 
campuses, recreational sites, and conference centers in over 47 countries to experience 
academic, cultural, and social enlightenment. Participants are on site for a week, usually 
participating in three courses set up by the program coordinator. These courses are 
strictly informational, requiring no testing and no grading, and are often supplemented 
with tours and extracurricular activities. 

Armstrong State College has been providing Elderhostel since 1986 and now offers 
over 30 weeks of programming per year at two sites: ASC campus and Tybee Island. 
Armstrong's program is open to applicants within the community, nationwide, or 
abroad. Individuals 60 years of age and older are eligible. The program brings in over 
1000 participants in a year, contributing to Georgia's status as the second most popular 
state within the national program. 

Veterans will find the Office of Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs helpful in advising 
about admissions procedures and services available to them. 

Students with Disabilities are provided with needed services on an individual basis. 
After students are accepted to the college, if they have special needs as a result of a 
disability, they should plan to set up an appointment in the Office of Student Affairs to 
discuss their disability as it relates to their educational program. The college counselors, 
the Vice President and Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs will then attempt to 
provide services so that each disabled student has a positive educational experience at 
Armstrong State College. 

The Minority Advisement Program helps minority students develop interest in all 
facets of college life. A peer advisor offers one-on-one assistance to students in adjusting 



STUDENT LIFE 21 



to personal and academi< life on campus In addition, km ial 4 cultural and educational 
K ti\ -itu-s designed to broaden all students 4 knowledge ol African American people and 
thru contributions to sot ietj are presented. 

i he Adulta Ba< k to c ollege Program meets the spet laJ needs and * ow ems <»t the 
Hon traditional student Mature students who are beginning college 01 are returning after 
ie> era! years ,iw a\ will find thai the A B c program will ease their transition to student 
life and address their career and academic questions 

The Academic Computing Center houses separate minicomputer and microcom- 
puter facilities for student use All machines in the Academii ( omputing ( enter are 
connected to the campus wide network and allow access to file servers and other network 
services There is also a separate Engineering micro computer lab with high performajv e 
Zenith color workstations ^nd a I lewlitt-Packard high speed pen plotter. 

The Advisement Center, located on the second floor of Lane Library, provides 
academic advisement for undeclared majors and students who have c re defi< ien< ies in 
language^, social science, or sciences. The Center is staffed by fa< ulty volunteers from the 
academic departments Each quarter during Advance Registration (a two-week period 
after mid-term), students are expected to meet with an advisor to select courses for the 
following quarter. Advisors are also available during the rest of the quarter for questions 
ibout core curriculum, transfer credit, majors, and career choices. 

The Writing Center is a place where students in all disciplines may come for help with 
their writing. Tutors in the Writing Center offer individual instruction in basic writing 
skills and provide guidance in the preparation of essays, reports, and research papers. 
fhe aim oi the Writing Center is not only to assist students in core composition courses, 
but also to work with faculty to improve writing across the curriculum. The center is 
administered by the Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

The Reading Lab is used by students who feel the need for assistance in college level 
reading. Staffed by student tutors and by faculty volunteers from the Department of 
Developmental Studies, the lab is open 6-8 hours a day and, in addition to one-on-one 
assistance, offers audiotapes and computer programs that foster the development of 
reading skills. The lab is administered by the Department of Developmental Studies and 
is located on the second floor of the Lane Library. 

The Math Tutorial Center provides services on a first-come, first-served basis to a 
large number of students enrolled primarily in Developmental Studies math or in College 
Algebra. The Center is staffed 6-8 hours a day by student tutors and by faculty volunteers 
from Developmental Studies. The lab is administered jointly by the Department of 
Developmental Studies and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, and 
is located on the second floor of the Lane Library. 

Lane Library, built in 1966 and substantially enlarged in 1975, supports the academic 
programs at Armstrong State College. To that end, library faculty provide individual 
assistance in using library resources as well as course-integrated instruction in the 
classroom. The traditional repository role of academic libraries is enhanced through 
computer-assisted database searching, compact disc information systems, and a sizeable 
collection of non-print materials. The library is open over 85 hours weekly during 
academic sessions. 

The library collections consist of more than 700,000 total items, including 1 62,000 book 
volumes, 525,000 microforms, and 35,000 records, slides, motion pictures, kits, and 
videotapes. In addition, subscriptions are maintained to approximately 1 ,120 periodicals 
and newspapers. The Florence Powell Minis Collection contains college archives, mate- 
rials of local color, and first editions by Conrad Aiken and other Savannah authors. 

Through participation in state, regional and national resource sharing agreements, 
materials which are not available on the Armstrong campus may be obtained from 
other libraries. Traditional reference services are complemented by computerized data- 
base searching, both online, by reference librarians and at several compact disc stations 
by library users. 



22 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Library programs at Armstrong seek to meet the needs of each student in the course 
of study while also preparing graduates for life-long learning. 

The Book Store is the source of all required textbooks and course-related supplies. It 
also offers general supplies and a selection of imprinted apparel and gift items. 

Parking Regulations 

All vehicles driven on campus should display a college parking decal on the left rear 
bumper. Free decals are available at the Public Safety Office on Science Drive. 

All students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to become aware of the parking 
regulations. A set of regulations may be picked up in the Public Safety Office or Office of 
Student Affairs, and a copy is published in Students Illustrated. 




24 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



General Admission Policies 

Armstrong State College welcomes students who wish to pursue a college-level 
program of study. Applicants must provide evidence of a reasonable possibility of 
academic success in college in order to be admitted as a regular student. Applicants who 
do not meet the minimum requirements for admission may be admitted under condi- 
tional or provisional status or under other Special Admission Categories. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to employ appropriate assessment mecha- 
nisms to ascertain the suitability of applicants to enroll in the College and to deny 
enrollment or admission to individuals based upon the results of the assessment. 

Final acceptance or rejection of each applicant is determined by the Director of 
Admissions and is subject to the applicant's right of appeal to the Academic Standing 
Committee prior to the beginning of the desired quarter of entry. The committee will 
review the appeal and make a recommendation to the President of the College, who will 
render a decision. The College reserves the right to withdraw admission prior to or 
following enrollment if the student becomes ineligible as determined by the standards of 
the College or Board of Regents. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept any or all of the credits 
from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its accredited status, when the 
College determines through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or institution is, for any reason, deficient or unsatisfactory. The 
judgement of the College on this question shall be final. 

The College reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State 
of Georgia. All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to affirm that 
they will abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. 

Admission Requirements 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to request that official documents required for 
admission be sent directly from the previous institutions to the Office of Admissions. 
Documents that have been in the hands of the applicant, such as student copy transcripts 
or letters, grade reports, diplomas, or graduation lists are not official. The documents 
must be issued and mailed directly by the registrar of the previous institution(s) in a 
sealed envelope. These documents become part of the applicant's permanent record and 
will not be returned. 

The following items are required for admission: 

1. OFFICIAL APPLICATION FORM. An applicant seeking admission must file an 
application for admission prior to the specified deadline as indicated in the 
academic calendar. An application may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. 
Care should be taken to read the directions accompanying the application and 
provide all information requested. An incomplete application will cause delay and 
mav be returned to the applicant. 

2. CERTIFICATE OF IMMUNIZATION. All applicants must submit a University of 
Georgia Certificate of Immunization verifying immunity against measles, mumps, 
and rubella. This form must accompany the application. 

3. A $10 NONREFUNDABLE APPLICATION FEE. This processing fee is required 
with applications. 

4. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT(S) OF COURSES COMPLETED. A freshman applicant 
should ask his or her guidance department to send an official copy of the high 
school transcript. A delayed decision candidate must submit an official high school 
transcript and official college transcripts, if applicable. A transfer candidate should 
ask the registrar from each accredited college attended to send a transcript of 
grades (a separate transcript from each college) and submit a high school transcript 
if he or she has attempted less than 36 quarter hours or 24 semester hours. The 
holder of a GED certificate must request that an official score report be sent to the 
Office of Admissions. Please see Special Admissions categories. 






ADMISSIONS 25 



5 OFFIOA1 Si ORESON mi s^ HOI ASTK am in DJ ll-M (SAT) of the ( ollege 
Entrance I lamination Board 01 mi \\n kk \\ COL1 EG! rESTING P 
GRAM ( A< D Applications and Information may be obtained from the c ollege 
Entrance Examination Board (Box ^ 1 '2, Princeton, New Jersey 08540), or me 
American ( ollege resting Program 1 1355 I enox Road, N E . Suite 320, Atlanta, 
Georgia 13026 i 132) rhe ( EEB code assigned to Armstrong State c ollege ks 
005012 An [nstitutionaJ Scholastic Aptitude Tesi (ISAT) is offered quarterly 

through the Counseling and Placement Ottii/e ISA I scores uin be used Only tor 

admission to Armstrong State College A freshman candidate is required to submit 
SA1 or AC I scores A holder of the GED certificate is also required to submit SAT 

or AC I scores \ transfer candidate who has attempted less than 3h quarter hours 
or 24 semester hours must also submit SAT or Ac l scores Exceptions to the SAT 

and AC I requirements are discussed m the Special Admissions section. 
6. OTHER REQUIREMENTS. The College may require any applicant to appear tor a 
personal Interview and to take any achievement, aptitude and psychological tests 
it deems appropriate m order to make a decision regarding the applicant's 
qualification tor admission to the College. 

Admission of Recent High School Graduates 

An applicant must be a graduate of an accredited high school. Students graduating 
from high school in the Spring of 1 988, or later, must meet the requirements of the College 
Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents. Students who lack required 
courses in any of the five areas must make up the deficiencies according to established 
guidelines. The following high school courses are minimum requirements for regular 
admission: 

Units Instructional Emphasis/Courses 

English (4) * Grammar and usage 

* Literature (American and World) 

* Advanced composition skills 
Science (3) * Physical Science 

* At least two laboratory courses from Biology, 
Chemistry or Physics 

Mathematics (3) * Two courses in Algebra and one in Geometry 

Social Science (3) * American History 

* World History 

* Economics and Government 
Foreign Language (2) * Two courses in one language emphasizing speaking 

(must be listening, reading and writing) 

The minimum regular admission requirements to Armstrong State College are an SAT 
score of not less than 380 on the verbal section and 380 on the math section individually, 
or an ACT score of not less than 20 on the English section and 18 on the math section 
individually. Also a minimum 2.0 grade point average on all academic courses is 
required. All of the academic courses computed in the high school grade point average 
will have been taken in grades 9-12. 

Provisional Admission 

Applicants to the College who do not meet the College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) 
will be considered for provisional admission to the College. The following represents the 
College's criteria for provisional admission. 

English - Students graduating with less than the four required units of English will 
be required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) in English and the CPE 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



in Reading. Based on the student's score, the student would (1) exempt Developmental 
Studies English and /or Reading, or (2) be placed in Developmental Studies English and / 
or Reading. 

Mathematics - Students graduating with less than the three required units of 
mathematics will be required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) in 
mathematics. Based on the student's score, the student would (1) exempt Develop- 
mental Studies mathematics, or (2) be placed in Developmental Studies mathematics 
at the appropriate level. 

Science - Students graduating with less than the three required units of science will 
be required to take an additional five quarter hour (for credit) course in a laboratory 
science. 

Social Science - Students graduating with less than the three required units of social 
science will be required to complete one additional five quarter hour (for credit) course 
chosen from approved social science courses. 

Foreign Language - Students graduating with less than the two units of the same 
foreign language will be required to complete one additional five quarter hour (for 
credit) introductory foreign language course. 

All course work required as a result of a deficiency must be completed prior to the 
accumulation of 30 hours. In the areas of social science, science, and foreign language, the 
student is required to complete the appropriate course with a "C" grade or better. 
Students receive credit for courses used to satisfy College Preparatory Curriculum 
deficiencies, but such credit may not be used to satisfy core curriculum or degree 
requirements. 

Exceptions to the CPC Requirement 

1 . Any applicant who graduated from high school prior to Spring of 1 988 is exempt from 
CPC requirements. 

2. An applicant applying for any associate of applied science or associate of science 
degree program offered by Armstrong State College is exempt from the CPC require- 
ments. 

Conditional Admission 

An applicant who qualifies for admission to the College but who does not qualify for 
regular admission will be granted conditional admission. A student is conditionally 
admitted to the College if any part of the SAT score (verbal or math) is less than 380. A 
student is conditionally admitted to the College if the ACT English is less than 20, or ACT 
Math is less than 18. An applicant who scores less than 250 verbal or 280 mathematics on 
the SAT (less than 13 on the ACT English or less than 14 on the ACT math) and has less 
than a 1.8 high school grade point average on all academic courses will be denied 
admission to the College. 

All conditionally admitted students must take the Collegiate Placement Examination 
(CPE) in order to qualify for regular admission. This examination must be taken before 
the student's acceptance at the College. 

Any student placed in a course numbered below 100, either by his or her SAT (or 
ACT) scores, or by his or her CPE scores, will be considered a conditionally admitted 
Developmental Studies student. 

Any other courses taken prior to completing and passing appropriate parts of the 
CPE must be approved by the Developmental Studies Counselor or by an advisor 
within that department. 

Any student who is in the Developmental Studies Program or signs up for a Develop- 
mental Studies course must have a schedule of classes approved by the Developmental 
Studies Counselor or by an advisor within that department each time the student 
registers. 






ADMISSIONS 



27 



\ itudenl In a i tevelopmenttJ Studies course will exit Developmental Studies in the 
follow ing \\ i 

i Passing all required parts ol thei ollegiate Place m e n ! Examination 

[fan) required part of the ( PE is not passed, the student will be required tom roll 
in the appr op riate I developmental Studies ^ ourse i pon successful < ompletion oi 
all required I te> elopmentaJ Studies ^ ourses and passing tin- c ri . the studenl will 
exit l JevelopmentaJ Studies 
\ studenl in i developmental Studies will be gh en four quarters per area to stu i ess 
hilly exit that area A studenl failing to exit an area after tour attempts will be sublet t to 
i V\ elopmentaJ Studies suspension c opies ol tin- polk ies i>t the I JevelopmentaJ Studies 
Program may be obtained from the Developmental Studies ( tffice 

Credit by Examination 

Armstrong State College will grant up to one-fourth ol the credit required in a college 
degree tor satisfactory vmvs on the following examinations; 



u I Profu ienc) Examination Statistics 
Advanced Placement 

English Literature & Composition 

Calculus AB 

Calculus BC 

Chemistry 

American Historv 

European History 
ATP Achievement Tests 

American History 

European Historv 
College-Level Examination Program 

Humanities 

Natural Sciences 

Analysis and Interpretation of 
Literature 



College Composition 
College French 
College German 
College Spanish 
American Government 
American History I 
American History II 
Introductory Sociology 
Western Civilization I 
Western Civilization II 
Calculus with Elementary Functions 
College Algebra 
College Algebra-Trigonometry 
DANTES Subject Tests Astronomy 
Criminal Justice 
General Anthropology 



Academic departments select the examinations and determine passing scores. The 
college credit awarded is the same as that earned by students who complete the 
equivalent course(s). The letter-grade "K" is used to identify credit by examination and 
has no effect on the academic grade point average. The Office of the Registrar adds 
courses and credit earned to the academic records of enrolled students. A brochure 
published by the Office of Student Affairs lists test dates and satisfactory scores for credit 
by exam. The American Government credit award is contingent upon passing, as well as 
a local test on the Georgia constitution. 

For additional information, please make inquiry to the Office of the Registrar/ 
Director of Admissions, the Office of Student Affairs, or the head of the appropriate 
academic department. 

College Credit for Military Experience and Training 

Students who wish to have their military experience and training evaluated for college 
credit should submit a copy of appropriate forms to the Registrar's office. Veterans 
should submit DD Form 214 and active duty military personnel should submit DD Form 
295. Active duty Army personnel and soldiers discharged since October 1, 1986, should 
also provide the Registrar with a copy of their Army /American Council on Education 
Registry Transcript. 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

To be admitted to the Regents Engineering Transfer Program at Armstrong State 
College, students must have achieved at least: 

1. 550 on the mathematics portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT); and 

2. 450 on the verbal portion of the SAT; and 

3. 3.0 high school grade point average. 

This institution's faculty members have worked closely with Georgia Tech's faculty 
to assure a curriculum which is well-coordinated with that of Georgia Tech. Specific 
times each quarter have been established for students to visit the Georgia Tech campus 
and meet with representatives of their anticipated major. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program students who satisfactorily complete the 
pre-engineering curriculum and apply for transfer will be accepted to Georgia Tech. 
However, admission to the most popular majors, as for other Georgia Tech students, 
will be based upon overall grade point average, performance in the required pre- 
requisite courses and availability of student spaces. 

Requirements of Transfers 

1. Transfer students completing high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, from 
non-University System institutions will be required to submit their high school 
transcripts as part of their application process unless they have completed their 
freshman and sophomore years, completed an associate degree, or have more than 45 
hours of transfer credit approved. This requirement also applies to students enrolled 
in University System programs that do not require the College Preparatory Curricu- 
lum for admission. 

2. Transfer students completing high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, transferring 
from University System institutions will maintain their CPC status as determined by 
the first University System institution making the original CPC evaluation. 

3. Transfer applicants completing high school prior to Spring of 1988 will follow the 
same procedure as freshman applicants except these applicants will not be required 
to meet the College Preparatory Curriculum requirements. In addition, these appli- 
cants who have achieved sophomore standing at the time of entrance, will not be 
required to submit their high school records. Such records may be required by the 
Office of Admissions, but normally the transcripts of previous college records will 
suffice in place of the high school record. Transfer applicants must ask the Registrar, 
of each college they have previously attended, to mail an official transcript of their 
records to the Office of Admissions at Armstrong State College, regardless of the 
transferability of the credits. 

4. Transfer applicants will not be considered for admission unless they are academically 
eligible to return to the college or university last attended, or unless the officials of the 
institution last attended recommend the applicant's admission. 

5. Transfer applicants will be considered for admission to Armstrong State College, if, 
on all work attempted at other institutions, their academic performance as shown by 
their grade-point-average is equivalent to the minimum standard required by Arm- 
strong State College students by comparable standing. Students not meeting the 
required GPA may be admitted on Good Standing, with Warning. (See chart under 
Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy in the "Academic Regulations" section of 
this Catalog.) 

6. Credit will be given for transfer work in which students received a grade of "C" or 
above. Credit will also be given for transfer work in which the students received 
grades of "D", with the limitation that such credit from nonUniversity System 
institutions will not exceed twenty-five percent of the total amount of credit accepted 
with grades of "C" or above. College credit will not be allowed for such courses as 
remedial English, remedial mathematics, or remedial reading or courses basically of 
secondary school level. 



ADMISSIONS 



rranafa students from outside tin- 1 niversity System o( i leorgia who ha\ 
completed tin- required English courses pres< ribed bj Armstrong degree pn 
should visit tin- 1 Hre< tor o( c omposition U iambic I!'- 1 i > for .> pla< emenl Interview 
At this Interview the I Hre< tor oi C omposition w ill evaluate student trans< ripts tor 
English credits, sdminister the English Placement I est (it necessary), provide infor 
mation ow the composition sequence and the c leorgia Regents' rest, and determine 
placement In tlu* appr o priate composition course Interview si hedult lilable 

in the Office oi the Registrar and in tlu* Department oi I anguages, I Iteratun 
Dramatic Arts in addition, transfer oi an American c lovernment i ourse In substitu- 
tion tor POS 113 is contingent upon passing .i Io< al test on the i leorgia constitution 
s I rartsier credit may be accepted from degree granting institutions that areac< redited 
a! the collegiate level by their appropriate regional accrediting agency Provisions 
may beconsidered when an institution appeals the policy. Students transferring from 
an institution which is not a member oi a regional accrediting agency must achieve 
a ( average on their first fifteen quarter hours of work at Armstrong in order to be 
eligible to continue. In certain areas they may be required to validate credits by 
examination. In computing cumulative grade averages, only the work attempted at 
Armstrong will be considered. 

9. The amount or credit that Armstrong will allow for work done in another institution 
within a given period oi time may not exceed the normal amount of credit that could 
have been earned at Armstrong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours 
may be transferred from a junior college. At least half of the courses in the major must 
be taken at Armstrong. 

10. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may consist ol 
courses taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. No correspondence 
courses may be used to meet the requirements in the major field or the related fields 
for the Bachelor's degree or in English composition or foreign language. No correspon- 
dence courses may be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval of the 
appropriate Dean and the head of the department in which the student is majoring. 

1 1 . If the Core Curriculum requirements in Area I (Humanities), Area II (Sciences), and / 
or Area III (Social Sciences) have been completed in a University System of Georgia 
institution, each completed area will be accepted as having met the respective area 
requirement at Armstrong State College. 

12. An official evaluation of all previous college credit earned will be done during the 
first quarter of the applicant's attendance. Transfer credit will be awarded from 
institutions listed in the American Association of College Admission Officers and 
Registrars as being fully accredited. 

Developmental Studies Transfer Student Policy 

Conditionally admitted transfer students must meet the same admission require- 
ments as individuals admitted to the College for the first time. A complete record of the 
student's past remedial coursework and CPE scores must be on file in the Armstrong 
State College Registrar's Office before the student can be admitted . Further, conditionally' 
admitted transfer students must be eligible to return to their previous institutions before 
they will be considered for admission to Armstrong State College. 

Readmission 

Students who have not been enrolled at Armstrong during the current academic year 
(the academic year begins with the Fall Quarter) must apply for readmission on a form 
provided by the Office of The Registrar. Former students who have not attended another 
college since leaving Armstrong may be readmitted, provided they are not on suspension 
at the time they wish to reenter. Former students who have attended another college since 
leaving Armstrong must meet requirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time 
of return. A student who is readmitted after an absence from the college for more than two 
years must meet degree requirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time of his or 
her return. 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Transient Students 

Students enrolled in another college or university may apply for temporary admission 
to Armstrong State College. They must have written approval from their Dean or 
Registrar that they are in good standing and have permission to take specific courses at 
Armstrong State College to be transferred to their own institution when satisfactorily 
completed. Transient students are admitted for a specific period of time, normally one 
quarter. If they wish to remain at Armstrong State College longer than one quarter they 
must submit additional statements from their Dean or Registrar, or must meet all 
requirements for regular admission as a transfer student. 

Armstrong Students Transient Elsewhere 

Armstrong students who wish to take course work at another college with the intent 
of applying the courses to their academic record at Armstrong may do so in accordance 
with regulations for transient status to another college. Student must meet the require- 
ments stipulated by the other college, and, in order to apply the credits toward their 
academic records at Armstrong, must meet the academic regulations of Armstrong. 
Consult with the Registrar's Office for details. 

Accelerated Program for High School Students 

Through this program for superior high school seniors, students may complete more 
than two-thirds of the freshman year of college before beginning a regular college career. 
Students accepted into the program may choose any freshman course provided they meet 
course prerequisites and receive permission from their high school principal or counselor 
and their college advisor. 

Students in this program may enroll for college credit in a maximum of two courses 
each quarter while completing their senior year of high school. Upon graduation from 
high school, the student will be admitted as a regular college enrollee. 

Students forfeit the privilege of this program if they receive a college course grade 
below C or their high school average in academic courses falls below B in any quarter. 

The College will consider students for this program only upon written recommen- 
dation of their high school principals or counselors. 

To be admitted to the program, students must satisfy all of the following criteria: 

1 . Written recommendation by the principal or counselor of the high school; 

2. Written consent of parent or guardian (if the student is a minor); 

3. Completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school; 

4. A combined verbal and mathematics SAT score of no less than 1,000, or ACT 
Composite no less than 25. 

5. A minimum high school grade-point-average on all academic courses of 3.0; 

6. Completion of the University System of Georgia's College Preparatory Curriculum 
(CPC) requirements with the following exceptions: 

(a) Students with an SAT verbal score of at least 450 (or ACT English of at least 23) 
who have not completed the final unit of high school English and /or social 
studies will be permitted to fulfill these high school requirements with the 
appropriate college courses. 

(b) Students who have not completed the College Preparatory Curriculum re- 
quirements may be admitted through the joint enrollment program (see 
below) if they are enrolled in the necessary high school courses and scheduled 
to complete the requirements by the end of their senior year. 

With the exception of English and social studies courses taken by students with the 
required SAT or ACT score, a college course may not be used to fulfill both high school 
College Preparatory Curriculum requirements and college degree requirements. 



ADMISSIONS 31 



Early Admission and Joint Enrollment Programs 

tanStfOftfi Mate C 0ll6gC Offers >n earl\ .ulmissum proj;i,im tnr (host- students who 

have completed the eleventh grade In high school tnd who have demonati 
outstanding icademk potential rhe criteria foi admission to this program are the 
•amc as those listed foi the Accelerated Program 

Additionally, tin- college offers i joint enrollment program which is an «-«» rl \ 
admissions program allowing students to enroll full time .it the t ollege while 
remaining on the rolls ol a local high w hool After mm ceaafull) meeting .ill established 
criteria for the Accelerated Pro gr am, students will be awarded high m hool diplomas at 
tho end of their freshman year In college lor Further information on this pro gra m, 
prospective applicants should consult with their high school counselors and request 
Information from the Office of Admissions 

Special Admission Categories 

GED 

An applicant who is not a high school graduate may be considered tor admission 
based upon completion of the General Educational Development Examination (GED) 
with a score that satisfies the minimum requirement of the State of ( leorgia (standard 
score average-45). A score report must be submitted directly to the College from the GED 
testing center where the student took the test, or by DANTES (2318 South Park Street, 
Madison, Wisconsin, 53713) if the student took the test through the United States Armed 
Forces Institute while in military service. If the applicant's high school class graduated 
in the Spring of 1988, or later, then all College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) require- 
ments must be met. The only exception to this requirement will be those applicants 
pursuing associate of science or associate of applied science degrees. These individuals 
are exempt from the CPC requirements. 

Delayed Admission 

Applicants who have not attended high school or college within the previous five 
years, and have earned fewer than 20 transferable quarter hours of college credit, are not 
required to take the SAT or ACT admissions test. However, these applicants will be 
required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination and complete any Developmental 
Studies requirements. Students admitted under this category must complete 30 hours of 
college credit with a minimum 2.0 grade point average in order to be granted regular 
admission status. 

Persons 62 Years of Age or Older 

Persons who are 62 years of age, or older, may enroll as regular students in credit 
courses on a "space available" basis without payment of fees, except for supplies, 
laboratory or special course fees. They must be residents of the State of Georgia and 
must present a birth certificate or comparable written documentation of age to enable 
the Admissions Office to determine eligibility. They must meet all admission and 
degree requirements. 

International Students 

(All students who are citizens of countries other than the U.S.) 

It is recommended that international students begin their attendance at the college in 

the Fall Quarter. The college also recommends that international students attend an ELS 

language center prior to enrollment. 

Students from a country other than the United States who are interested in attending 

Armstrong must meet the following requirements before application is made: 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



1. Meet the requirements of freshman applicants. International students must have 
completed the equivalent of a U.S. high school. However, College Preparatory 
Curriculum (CPC) requirements do not apply to these students. 

2. Have an official transcript of academic records mailed to the Office of Admissions 
at Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. If SAT or ACT scores are available, ask that the results be sent to Armstrong. If these 
scores are not available, the student will be required to take the Collegiate 
Placement Examination and take any such required coursework in accordance 
with the Developmental Studies Guidelines. 

4. A student whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score a minimum of 500 for consideration for 
admission to the College. 

5. Submit a statement of financial resources prior to attendance. 

6. Show proof of adequate health and life insurance. 

After completion of application form and submission of all required records, the 
College will make a decision on the application. If an application is approved, the 
College will send an 1-20 form (which the international student will use to obtain a 
student visa). Upon arrival these students may be tested in English composition for 
class placement purposes. 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon receipt of Certifica- 
tion of eligibility and entitlement from the Veterans Administration, veterans may attend 
under Public Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 815 
(disabled), Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans), or Public Law 631 
(children of permanently disabled veterans). Students under Public Laws 358, 631, 634 
should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Applicants 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other community agen- 
cies must apply at least six weeks before the beginning of any quarter to insure proper 
processing of applications. 

Requirements for Admission to Art and Music Programs 

The college-level study of art and music requires considerable background as well as 
a basic proficiency level. Those students who wish to major in art are expected to show 
the faculty a portfolio of previous work in at least one medium. In music, placement 
examinations are required of all entering students in music theory and applied music. 

Requirements and Procedures for Admission to Health 
Programs 

School of Health Professions Statement of Professional Standards 
Related to Applicants and Students 

All applicants to and students enrolled in the School of Health Professions must meet 
and continue to meet the approved professional standards of the School and respective 
programs. 

1. In order to meet the intellectual, physical and social competencies necessary tc 
meet professional requirements, all applicants and students must possess the 
needed physical attributes, and exhibit qualities of good judgment, mental strength 
and emotional stability. 



ADMISSIONS 



No applicant who ma\ jeopardize the health and 01 the ivell being oi .1 patient, 

cHent coworker or sell ma) be accepted into the School of Health Pi 

program or continue as b student within .1 program 

rhe individual programs will Inform each applicant m writing of the technical 

standards W hk h are related to the professional duties i»i tin- dis< ipline 
\ 1 he (acuity c4 each program or department shall he responsible tor applying the 

standards for their students and pro s per th e students 
5 in all cases, final appeal ma) be brought to the attention oi me 1 tean oi I lealth 

Profe ss ions who would appoint an Appeals committee 

Insurance 

Because oi contractual requirements. Health Insurance Is required oJ students In 
Associate Degree Nursing, Baccalaureate Degree Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical 
Technology, Radiologic Technologies and Respiratory Therapy. Malpractice/Liability 
Insurance Is required o( students in Associate Degree Nursing, Baccalaureate I degree 
Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical Technology, Radiologic Technologies and Respira- 
tory Therapy. 

Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs 

There are many more students applying for admission to these programs than we have 
spaces available. Therefore, 

1 . IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONTACT THE PROGRAM OF YOUR CHOICE 
FOR ADVISEMENT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

2. Admission to Armstrong State College and/or completion of prerequisite courses 
do/does not guarantee you admission to a Health Professions program. Because 
each program has its own admission criteria and procedure for admission, stu- 
dents must apply to the particular programs they wish to enter. 

3. NO MORE THAN TWO (2) SCIENCE COURSES MAY BE REPEATED, and that 
NO ONE COURSE MAY BE REPEATED MORE THAN ONCE. If a student fails a 
course a second time, he/she will not be eligible for admission to the health 
programs for which this course is a requirement. 

4. ONLY STUDENTS MAKING SATISFACTORY PROGRESS toward admission to, 
or in an Armstrong State College health program will be assigned a science seat. 

Associate Degree Nursing 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" above. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee formal 
admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program. Application for admission will be 
accepted between January 1st and April 15th for the coming academic year. Admission 
decisions will normally be made in April/May each year. 

The Admissions Committee of the Department of Associate Degree Nursing will act 
only on completed applications. A student seeking admission to the program who has 
taken courses at another college must supply the ADN office with a current transcript. 
After admission to the program, the student must pay a $50.00 non-refundable Health 
Professions Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit is applied to the 
student's first quarter matriculation fee. Students who qualify for admission but who are 
not admitted because of lack of space may reapply. Students admitted for a given quarter 
must enter the program during that quarter or reapply for admission for any subsequent 
quarter. Determination of admission to the program is a function of the faculty. 

Transfer students must meet the criteria for admission to the Department of Associate 
Degree Nursing as stated. Credit for nursing and science courses taken prior to applica- 
tion to the program must be approved by the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 
It is recommended that nursing courses not be over one year old and science courses not 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



be over five years old. Students wishing to be given credit for nursing courses which are 
over one year old and science courses which are over five years old may be required to 
validate current knowledge by examination or be required to repeat these courses. 

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing 
and is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program is made on a space available 
basis and is limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Associate Degree 
Nursing faculty using an admission point index system. Admission criteria include: 

1 . Completion of ZOO 208 with a grade of "C" or better. 

2. Completion of CHE 201. 

3. Completion of MAT 101. 

4. Eligibility for ENG 101. 

5. A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

Time Limit for Program Completion 

Students must complete the Associate Degree Nursing Program within three consecu- 
tive academic years from the date of their initial entry into the program. Students who do 
not complete the program within this time limit must reapply for admission, meet current 
criteria for admission, and have their previous credits evaluated at the time of their 
subsequent admission. Students who are readmitted must meet course requirements in 
effect at the time of their readmission. 

Transfer Applicants 

Transfer applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded 
depending upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the 
Department of Associate Degree Nursing faculty who will use actual course outlines, 
descriptions, etc., supplied by the student. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State 
College and the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in 
effect at the time of readmission. 

3. If eligible, the student's readmission will be based upon space availability and 
recommendation by the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 

Baccalaureate Nursing Department 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Applicants to the program must be regularly admitted to Armstrong State College 
prior to making application to the nursing major. Students must meet the admission 
requirements of the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing to be eligible for admission 
to the nursing major. Admission to the nursing major is the function of the Faculty. 
Only completed applications will be considered. 

Students will be admitted to the nursing major during Winter Quarter, Sophomore 
year. After admission to the nursing major, the student must submit a $50.00 non- 
refundable deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit is applied to the tuition. 
Students who are not admitted may reapply for the next year. 

Applicants may address the Head of the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing if they 
require additional information concerning admission procedures. 



ADMISSIONS 



l he Bachelor oi ^ lencedegree program is appr ov e d by tru Board of Nui 

and is tu IK •< i redited in tin- National I aague km Nursing <\i NO 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission i riteria iiu ludc 

1 Regular admission to Armstrong State C ollege 

\ minimum s A I verbal score oi 
) \ minimum SA I mathematics score oi WO (SA1 scores will not be required for 

those applicants with Assoc iate, Ba< helor's or Master's D eg r e e s ) 

4 A grade oi "( or better In each science course. 

5 -\ minimum adjusted GPA oi 2J in all prerequisite course work attempted 
However! meeting minimal requirements does not guarantee admission to the 
nursing major rhose applicants who, in the judgment oi the Recruitment and 
Retention Committee present the strongest academic record and show the most 

promise Oi success in the nursing major will be accepted In making comparisons 

between applicants, the Recruitment and Retention Committee evaluates the 
academic record ot each applicant thoroughly, including an evaluation of grades 
received in particular courses. 
6. Application to the nursing major must be submitted no later than the end of Fall 
quarter ot the Sophomore vear. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance 
status by the end oi Winter quarter. 

Students must meet all legal requirements for licensure. See "Baccalaureate Degree 

Nursing" section of this catalog "Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements." 

8. Admitted students must submit all required health data, CPR certification, proof 

of health insurance and liability insurance by August 1 , prior to Fall quarter entry. 

It should be noted that the pool of applicants has increased in quality and quantity in 

recent quarters, and that admission to the nursing major is of a competitive nature. 

Transfer Applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded 
depending upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the 
Nursing Facultv who will use actual course outlines, descriptions, etc., supplied by the 
student. 

Registered Nurse applicants must meet the criteria established for admission to the nursing 
major and must also submit proof of licensure. 

All nursing students shall comply with legal, moral, and legislative standards that 
determine unacceptable behavior of the nurse and that may be cause for denial of a license 
to practice as a registered nurse, in accordance with Georgia law regulating practice of 
registered nursing. 

Program Completion Requirements 

Students must complete the Baccalaureate Nursing Program within four consecutive 
years from the date of their initial admission to the nursing major. Students who do not 
complete the program within this time limit must apply for readmission, meet current 
criteria for admission, and have their previous credits evaluated. Students who are 
granted readmission must meet course requirements in effect at the time of readmission. 

Senior nursing students are required to take a written comprehensive exam prior to 
graduation. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State 
College and the nursing major. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in 
effect at the time of readmission. 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



3. The student's admission will be based upon space available and recommendation 
by the Recruitment and Retention Committee of the Department of Baccalaureate 
Nursing. 

Associate Degree Dental Hygiene 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee admission to 
the Associate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. Applicants must first be accepted for 
admission to the College with regular admission status before the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee evaluates the application to the Associate Degree Program in 
Dental Hygiene. 

Admission to the program is limited in each class. Students matriculate in the Fall 
Quarter of each year. Applications for admission should be completed as soon as possible 
for the Fall quarter and must include a transcript of all academic work. 

The Department has a separate formal admission process in addition to the admission 
process to Armstrong State College. 

The program requires students to submit a complete health history form, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation 
in clinical experiences. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Dental Hygiene major is on a space available basis 
and is limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee. Admission criteria include: 

Regular Admission Criteria: 

1 . Admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 

3. A minimum high school GPA of 2.5 or a minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 
Because of the heavy emphasis on science in the dental hygiene curriculum, it is 

important that the applicant have a strong foundation in biology and chemistry. 

The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee will give special consideration to appli- 
cants who have completed one year of college work and who have completed CHE 201 
or ZOO 208 (or their equivalents) with a grade of "C" or better. 

Applicants who do not meet the criteria for regular admission outlined above may still 
apply for admission. Please contact the Department for information. 

After admission to the Dental Hygiene Department, the student must pay a $50.00 
non-refundable Health Programs Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit 
is applied to the student's first quarter matriculation fee. 

The applicant may request a personal interview with the Dental Hygiene Admissions 
Committee to discuss the application after all credentials have been received. 

Challenge Examinations 

Challenge examinations for specific dental hygiene subject areas are available in the 
department. Contact the department for information. 

Readmission Procedures 

1 . The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State College 
and the Department of Dental Hygiene. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

3. The student' s readmission will be based upon space availability and recommendation 
by the Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee. 



i 



ADMISSIONS 37 



Baccalaureate Degree Dental Hygiene Education 

c indidatee tor the program must be graduate* oi m i nedited .ismh iate degree dental 
hygiene programs ind licensed as registered dental hygienists 

Students begin their course oi sequeiu ed dental hygiene co ur ses in the fall Quarter 

Application tor admission should be Completed ^ s soon ds possible. 

Transfer credits are accepted tor courses other than the protessmn.il sequence A 
minimum ot 45 quarter hours must be earned at Armstrong State College tor the Bachelor 
ot fk ience Degree In Dental Hygiene Education to be awarded from this institution. The 

Office ot the Registrar will evaluate all transfer credits. The Department has a separate 
formal admissions process in addition to the admission process to Armstrong State 
College 

The program requires students to submit a complete health history form, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation 
in clinical experiences. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. Dental Hygiene Licensure. 

2. One year of professional experience preferred. This may include any dental-related 
work experience. 

3. A minimum 2.0 GPA on all previous college work. Students transferring from 
another college must have this average to be considered for admission. The 2.0 
average must be maintained to date of actual matriculation in the program. 

How to Apply 

1 . Complete all application forms required for admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Complete the separate Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Application Form and 
return to the Department. 

3. Submit National Board Scores to the Department of Dental Hygiene. 

Associate Degree Respiratory Therapy 

See Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs in the Admissions section of 
this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not guarantee admission to the Respira- 
tory Therapy program. The department has a separate formal admissions process. 

Students are normally admitted to the professional component of the program in the 
fall. The application deadline is June 1. Applications received after that date will be 
considered on a space available basis. Our maximum enrollment ceiling is 20 students. 

To meet contractual obligations with our clinical affiliates, students are required to 
submit a complete health history form and evidence of health insurance and liability 
(malpractice) insurance prior to participation in clinical practicums. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Good academic standing at the time of admission to the major. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have withdrawn or been suspended from the program must apply for 
readmission. Applications must be received at least 1 quarter prior to the actual time of 
readmission. A student must be in good academic standing at the time of readmission. 

A student who has been dismissed from the program for any reason will not be eligible 
for readmission. 



38 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Disclosure 

The curriculum is demanding and requires total commitment. During most quarters 
students are in direct contact with their instructors 25-30 hours per week. We discourage 
students from working more than 16-24 hours per week. 

Our graduate profile indicates a successful student will have an SAT score greater 
than 800 (400M, 400V) and at least 30 hours of previous college credit with a GPA of 2.4 
or higher. Students requiring more than 1 area of developmental studies are usually not 
successful. The attrition rate for a given class ranges from 30-50%. 

Job Placement/Market 

Our graduates have a 100% job placement record over the past 12 years. We cannot 
guarantee that all graduates will find immediate employment in the Savannah area. 
Forecasters project that the number of positions in respiratory care will increase by 50% 
prior to the year 2000. 

Associate Degree Radiologic Technologies 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not guarantee admission to the 
Radiologic Technologies Department. The Department has a separate formal admis- 
sions process in addition to the admission process to Armstrong State College. 

Students are normally only admitted to the professional component of the program at 
the start of the Fall Quarter each year except for transfer students. Students may begin 
taking core courses at any time but need not have completed all the core courses prior to entry 
into the professional component. The application process begins in the Fall quarter of the 
year. 

To meet contractual obligations with the clinical affiliates, the program requires 
students to submit evidence of health insurance, evidence of liability (malpractice) 
insurance, CPR certification, and a physical examination prior to participation in clinical 
education courses. 

Criteria for Admission 

The actual determination of admission of applicants to the department is a function 
of the Radiologic Technologies Program Admissions Committee. Admissions are 
competitive in nature and are based on scholastic history. 

The following are specific criteria for admission: 

1. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in a high school curriculum. 

2. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in all science and mathematics courses in the high school 
curriculum. 

3. A minimum overall adjusted college GPA of 2.0, if applicable. 

4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in all mathematics and science courses at the college levels. 

5. Must be eligible for college English and Algebra. 

The above listed criteria is required, however, we give preference to students that have 
completed 20 or more quarter hours of degree required core courses and have a 2.2 or 
better cumulative GPA. 

Applicants who do not meet the criteria for admissions outlined above may still 
apply for admission. Please contact the Department for information. 

After admission to the Radiologic Technology Department, the student must pay 
a $50.00 nonrefundable Health Programs Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This 
deposit is applied to the student's first quarter matriculation fee. 



ADMISSIONS 



Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and have enrolled in the Associate I fc 
j.im in Radiologi< technologies, but who have eithei withdrawn 01 been 
dismissed without prejudice from the program, ma) &pply ,or readmission to the 
program only it they have a cumulative college GPA ol 2o.it the time they wish t<> 
reenter, rhe student's readmission will be based upon space availability and recom 
mendation by the Radiologic I e< hnologies Admissions ( ommittee 

Baccalaureate Degree Health Science 

Criteria for Admission to Program 

1 Regular admission to Armstrong State Colli 

2 t ligible for MAI 101 and ENG 101. 
J Adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

4. Formal inten iew conducted by health science faculty members. 
5 ^ ompleted health science program application. 

Baccalaureate Degree Medical Technology Program 

The professional phase of the Medical Technology curriculum begins in the fall 

quarter ot each year with the MT courses. Students desiring acceptance to the Medical 
Technology Program should make application to the program during the early spring 
Of the preceding academic \ ear. 

Minimum Admission Requirements 

1. SAT ot at least S00 with 350 or more in Math and 350 or more in Verbal. 

2. Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.2 or more. 

v c ompletion of required chemistry and biology courses prior to the senior year. 
4 Science course (Chemistry and Biology) average of 2.25 or better with no more than 
one required science course with a grade of "D" 

5. Satisfactory completion of Regents' Testing Program. 

Other Requirements 

Per NAACLS requirement, all applicants must ha ve taken the organic or biochemist ry 
course and the microbiology course within the past seven years. Updating coursework 
can be done by completion (a grade of "C" or better) of the appropriate course or by a 
challenge examination. 

Currently enrolled Armstrong State College students must also meet the require- 
ments for admission to the MT program and apply to the program. 

Transfer students must be accepted to the college with "Regular Status" admission. 

Certified associate degree medical laboratory technicians may receive transfer 
credit for junior level MT courses upon presentation of acceptable certification scores 
and /or transfer credit and satisfactory completion of written and /or practical exami- 
nations in the professional content areas. 

An applicant with B.S. degree not desiring the B.S. in Medical Technology degree 
must meet the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences academic 
prerequisites for Medical Technology. These students will be awarded a certificate upon 
completion of the professional coursework. 

Foreign applicants must meet the requirements for admission to Armstrong State 
College as outlined in the college catalog. 

Application Process 

1 . Complete all requirements for Application for Admission to Armstrong State College 
if not currently enrolled at ASC. 



40 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2. Complete an Application to Medical 
Technology Program form. 

3. Have official transcripts sent to Pro- 
gram Director. 

4. If certified, have scores sent to Program 
Director. (Ask Program Director for form 
letter.) 

5. Applicants meeting the minimum ad- 
mission requirements will be invited 
for an interview with at least two of the 
Admission Committee members, one of 
whom is the Program Director. 

6. Request two references to complete 
Confidential Appraisal Form to be for- 
warded to Program Director. 

7. All applicants will be informed by letter 
of their application status. 








I 

\*t * ,"■ - *Z 




^ / 







/ 



42 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Expenses 

The following schedules list the principal expenses and regulations concerning the 
payment of fees. Fees and charges are sublect to change at the end of any quarler. 

When such changes are made, notice will be given as far in advance as possible. 

Tuition 

Georgia Residents 

The matriculation fee for students registering for at least 12 quarter hours is $447.00. 
Students carrying fewer than 12 credit hours on campus in a quarter will pay $37.00 per 
quarter hour. This fee is waived for residents of Georgia upon presentation of written 
documentation that they are 62 years of age or older. 

Out-of-State Residents 

Full time students who are non-residents of Georgia pay a fee of $1,401.00. Those 
carrying fewer than 12 credit hours in a quarter pay $112.00 per quarter hour tuition. 
Out-of state tuition fees are waived for active duty military personnel and their 
dependents stationed in Georgia (except military personnel assigned to this insti- 
tution for educational purposes). 

Regents' Policies Governing Residency Requirements 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must establish the following 
facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1 . (a) If a person is 1 8 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student 
only upon a showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period 
of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

(b) No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed 
to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any 
educational institution in this State, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he 
or she has in fact established legal residence in this State. 

2. If a person is under 1 8 years of age, he or she may register as an in-state student only 
upon a showing that his or her supporting parent or guardian has been a legal 
resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding 
the date of registration. 

3. If a parent or legal guardian of a minor changes his or her legal residence to another 
state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the minor may continue to 
take courses for a period of twelve consecutive months on the payment of in-state 
tuition. After the expiration of the twelvemonth period, the student may continue 
his or her registration only upon the payment of fees at the out-of-state rate. 

4. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as guardian of a 
nonresident minor, such minor will not be permitted to register as an in-state 
student until the expiration of one year from the date of court appointment, and 
then only upon a proper showing that such appointment was not made to avoid 
payment of the out-of-state fees. 

5. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students provided, however, that an alien 
who is living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite 
or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state 
tuition as a citizen of the United States. 

6. Waivers: An institution may waive out-ofstate tuition for: 

(a) nonresident students who are financially dependent upon a parent, parents or 
spouse who has been a legal resident of Georgia for at least twelve consecutive 
months immediately preceding the date of registration; provided, however, 
that such financial dependence shall have existed for at least twelve consecu- 
tive months immediately preceding the date of registration. 



. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



(b) Internationa] ttudenta ieta ted in the Institutional preaident or his authorized 
repre s entative, provided thai the numbei ol luch waivers In effect doei nol 
exceed one percent ol the equivalent t till time students enrolled il tlu- insti- 
tution m the tall quarter Lmmediatel) preceding tlu- quarter tor which die 
out oi state tuition is to be waived 

(c) full-time employees ol the University System, their spouses, and their de 
pendent children 

(d) Kill-time teachers in the public schools of Georgia or in the programs oi theState 
Board oi I echnk al and Adult Education and their dependent c hildren I ea< h- 
ers employed full-time on military bases in Georgia shall also qualify tor this 
waiver; 

(e) career consular officers and their dependents who are dtizens of the foreign 
nation which their consular office represents, and who are stationed and living 
in Georgia under orders oi their respective governments. This waiver shall 
apply only to those consular officers whose nations operate on the principle of 
educational reciprocity with the United States. 

(0 military personnel and their dependents stationed in Georgia and on active 
duty unless such military personnel are assigned as students to System institu- 
tions for educational purposes. 

(g) students who are legal residents of out-of-state counties bordering on Georgia 
counties in which an institution of the University System is located and who are 
enrolled in said institution. 

Residency Reclassification 

A student is responsible for registering under the proper residency classification. A 
student classified as a nonresident who believes that he/ she is entitled to be reclassified 
as a legal resident may petition the Registrar for a change in status. The petition must be 
filed no later than sixty (60) days after the quarter begins in order for the student to be 
considered for reclassification for the quarter. If the petition is granted, reclassification 
will not be retroactive to prior quarters. The necessary forms for this purpose are 
available in the Registrar's office. 

Student Housing 

To secure housing, students must send a $100.00 deposit with their housing applica- 
tion. Refer to the housing contract for specific terms and conditions. 

The fee for double occupancy is $602.00 and $770.00 for single occupancy per quarter. 

Food Service 

All students who reside in the dormitory must purchase a 5-day, 1 5-meal plan at the 
current fee of $500.00 per quarter. 

Other Special Costs 

APPLICATION FEE $10.00 

Must accompany initial application. Acceptance of application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student. Non-refundable. 

ATHLETIC FEE $41.00/qtr. 

All students pay each quarter. 
EXIT EXAM FEE 

Fees are announced in test bulletins. 



44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GRADUATION FEE $32.00 

Payable by each candidate for graduation when graduation application is submitted 
two quarters prior to graduation. If candidate is receiving a second degree at the same 
graduation ceremonies, an additional $5.00 is due. The full $30.00 is charged for a second 
degree awarded at a subsequent graduation ceremony. A fee of $1 5.00 is charged for each 
replacement diploma. 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS DEPOSIT $50.00 

Reserves a seat in appropriate health program, payable upon application to program. 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE $33.00 

Non-refundable fee charged to students who register after the registration period. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE $21 .00/qtr. 

All students pay each quarter. 

TRANSCRIPT FEE, OFFICIAL 1 free, $2.50 each additional 

Unofficial transcripts for academic advisement and schedule planning will be issued 
at no charge. 

Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one twenty-five minute private lesson per week 
(Music 130) or a fifty minute private lesson per week (Music 140, 240, 340, 440). A special 
fee of $48.00 is charged for students enrolled in Music 130. A special fee of $96.00 is 
assessed for Music 140440 to music majors enrolled for less than 12 hours and to students 
who are not music majors. Music majors may enroll, at no charge, for one applied music 
course from Music 140-440. Additional applied music courses will be assessed a special 
fee at the non-music major rate. 

The applied music fee is refundable only if the student does not meet the first 
scheduled lesson. 

Summary of Fees* 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 460.50 

Student Activity, per quarter $ 21.00 

Athletic, per quarter $ 41.00 

Total for Georgia Resident $ 522.50 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter $ 921.00 

Total for Non-Resident $1,443.50 

Matriculation Part-Time Students, per quarter hours $ 38.50 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-Time Students, per quarter hour 

(in addition to Matriculation Fee) $ 77.00 

*The fees shown are projected for the 1993-94 academic year and are subject to approval 

by the Board of Regents. 

Graduate fees are listed in the Graduate Catalog. 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each quarter when the course is scheduled by the college. 
Students who formally withdraw from a short course or conference up to twenty-four 
hours prior to the first class meeting will receive a full refund of fees paid. No refunds will 
be made for withdrawals after the first class meeting. Fees paid for courses or conferences 
cancelled by the Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education will be refunded 
100%. Refund checks will be mailed approximately four weeks after the approved 
withdrawal form is received by the Business Office. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Refunds 

Refunds oi tuition and fees will be made only upon writ ten .ipplu.it Ion forwithdi 
from school In the Office ot Student Affairs No refunds will be made to student! 
dropping a ». ourse Students who formally withdraw during the registration period end 
the tirst week ol clataes ere entitled to .1 refund oi < s "' oi the fees paid tor th.it quarter 
Students who formally withdraw during the seco n d week oi classes ant entitled to i 
refund oi 60* I ol the fees paid tor thai quarter. Students who formally withdraw during 
the third week ol rlsnom ire entitled to s refund ot 40' I ot the foes paid tor that quarter 

Students who formally withdraw during the fourth week ot daises are entitled to I 
refund ot 20* I oi the tees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after the fourth 
week of classes will be entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid that quarter. The 
refund schedule tor the Summer Quarter is printed in the Summer Quarter Schedule of 
Classes Students w ho register for multiple sessions in the Summer quarter and who drop 
courses in any of the sessions are not eligible for a refund since they are still enrolled. 
Students who register separately for different sessions and withdraw from all sessions 
may be eligible for a partial refund depending upon the withdrawal date. Refund checks 
will be mailed approximately four weeks after the withdrawal form is received by the 
Business Office. Students who have classes cancelled by the College and do not substitute 
comparable classes will receive refunds for the applicable fees upon proper notification 
oi the Business Office by the Registrar's Office. 

Military reservists recalled to active duty should contact the Business Office for refund 
information. 

Refunds of dormitory fees and deposits will be made only upon approval of the 
Director of Housing in the Office of Student Affairs. A dorm exit form must be completed 
by a dorm resident assistant or other housing official. Approved refunds will be mailed 
approximately four weeks after the exit form is received by the Business Office. 

Financial Obligations 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any financial obligation to the college will 
have grade reports and transcripts of records encumbered. The applicable fees . . . upon 
proper notification of the Business Office by the Registrar's Office. Grade reports and 
transcripts will not be released, nor will the student be allowed to register at the college 
until all financial obligations are met. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of registration. 

Students whose checks are returned by their bank must pay for the check plus a 
service charge of $20.00 or five percent of the check, whichever is greater. If a check is 
returned because of a bank error, the minimum service charge of $20.00 will apply. 
Students with returned checks who withdraw from school must follow the regular 
returned check procedure. When the check is paid, a refund will be processed. Student 
checks for tuition and fees will be assessed the service charge plus the late registration fee. 

Financial Aid 
Governing Principles 

Armstrong State College subscribes to the principle that the primary purpose of a 
student financial aid program is to provide financial assistance to students who without 
such assistance would be unable to attend college. The primary responsibility for 
financing a college education is the inherent obligation of the student and /or family. 
Financial assistance from Armstrong State College should be viewed as supplementary 
to the efforts of the student and /or family. An assessment of parental ability to contribute 
toward the student's educational expenses is made according to federal guidelines so that 
neither the parent, the student, nor Armstrong State College will be required to bear an 
undue share of the financial responsibility. 



46 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



General Information 

Student financial aid is awarded to eligible students on the basis of need in nearly all 
cases except scholarships which have been provided by donors for the purpose of 
recognizing academic promise or achievement. The determination of need is pro- 
vided for Armstrong State College students through the use of the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid. The process involves an analysis of the data provided by the 
student's family or, if independent, by the student. This analysis is sent to the Office of 
Student Financial Aid where it is compared with the cost of education for the appropriate 
classification of student. If the analysis shows that the family contribution or self 
contribution is less than the cost of education, financial need has been established. The 
Office of Student Financial Aid has the legal right to challenge information provided on 
the FAFSA if, in the opinion of the financial aid officer, that information appears to be 
inaccurate, incorrect, or misleading. 

In general, students who enter the College at the beginning of the Fall Quarter have 
a greater opportunity to receive financial assistance than those who enter later in the 
academic year. The awards processing time usually runs from May 1 to August 31. It is 
during this period that the Office of Student Financial Aid distributes its yearly allocation 
of funds to students who have completed the process cycle. Many types of assistance are 
awarded to the neediest students who apply first. In the event that there is a shortage of 
funds, students who are eligible for financial aid but whose applications were late will be 
placed on awaiting list until such time as funds become available. 

The Financial Aid Office is very interested in helping you find ways to finance your 
education. The application and awards process, however, is heavily regulated by federal 
and state law and as a result does not always proceed at a quick pace. Please keep in mind 
that although we are here to help you, we are not responsible for delays caused by 
inaccurate or incomplete applications and files. Unless your file is complete, correct, and 
unemcumbered at least a month prior to registration day each quarter, you should be 
prepared to pay your own fees. 

Students are eligible to apply for financial assistance provided that: (1) the student 
meets the requirements pertinent to the program(s) from which assistance is sought; 
and (2) the student has been admitted to the college or is enrolled in good standing and 
is making satisfactory academic progress. Graduate students should apply for assis- 
tance through Georgia Southern. Students who are classified as Transient, Continuing 
Education, or Exchange are not eligible for financial aid. Students are required to 
adhere to all regulations and requirements of the program from which they receive 
assistance and to notify the Office of Financial Aid of any change in status which may 
affect their eligibility for aid. 

Application Information 

An applicant for student financial aid must: 

1 . Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at Armstrong State College. 

2. Obtain, complete, and submit a FAFSA by May 1 preceding the next academic year. 

3. Submit a PELL GRANT Student Aid Report to the Office of Student Financial Aid 
by May 1 preceding the next academic year. 

4. Complete an Armstrong Application for Financial Aid. 

5. Submit a copy of the student's and parent's (if dependent) Income Tax returns from 
the previous year, if requested. 

It may be necessary to complete additional forms depending on a student's year in 
school, major course of study, and /or eligibility for a particular program. Applications 
for financial assistance must be repeated annually. Most student financial aid awards are 
for the entire academic year, with payments made to the student in equal quarterly 
installments. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 47 



rhe minimum number of quarter hours for which a student financial aid recipient ma) 
i-Mi oil pei quartei \ ariee from program to pro gram s t>nw require al least l- 1 now 
quarter null time status) Man) programs require tii.it the student be enrolled al least 
halt time taking 6 or more quarter hours 

Studentsappl) ing for financial aid whether eligible or not. who do not meei or adhere 
to the aboi e requirements will not ho <. onsidered tor finaru ial aid it is the responsibility 
of the parents and or student to determine th.n .ill pertinent Information and data have 
been obtained and are located In the( tfficeol Student I inaiu ial Aid to assure a complete 
and act urate a^ arding ol finan< ial assistant r 

\\ hen the student ins delivered the PEI 1 ( Irani Student Aid Report (SAR) and the 
Armstrong Application tor Financial Aid« the Office ol Student Finan< ial Aid will send 
the student a tentative award rtotk e 

Transfer Students 

In addition to the above requirements tor all financial aid students, transfer students 

are required to submit a complete Financial Aid Transcript from the Financial aid office 
ot each institution of higher education previously attended whether or not aid was 
received \o awards will be made until these documents have been received by the Office 
ot Student Financial Aid. 

Types of Aid 

Grants — Awards that students are not required to repay. 

Federal Pell Grants are based on need. Pell Grants are awarded to eligible under- 
graduate students. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are awarded to 
undergraduates who exhibit exceptional financial need. 

Georgia Student Incentive Grants are state grants awarded to full-time undergradu- 
ate students who are legal residents of Georgia. 

Loans — Money that students borrow and repay with either cash or service. 2.0 G.P.A. 
required. 

Federal Stafford Loans are available through local lending institutions and state 
agencies. Repayment begins after the student leaves school. 

Georgia Service-Cancellable Guaranteed Student Loans are offered for certain 
"critical" health and teaching fields. These loans are repaid by service in Georgia after 
graduation. 

Federal Supplemental Loans for Students are available to independent students 
regardless of need. Students in the first and second year of an academic program may 
borrow up to $4,000 /year. Students who have completed the first and second year of an 
academic program but who have not completed their program of undergraduate study 
may borrow up to $5,000 /year. 

Federal PLUS Loans are available to parents of dependent students. Parents may 
borrow up to the cost of education minus the estimated financial assistance that a student 
will receive. 

Institutional Short-term Loans are available to students for a maximum of 60 days. 
These loans are used primarily to assist students with the payment of tuition and fees. 
These loans are available to eligible students for a maximum of $300. Other require- 
ments concerning short-term loans are available in the Office of Student Financial 
Aid. 



48 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Employment 

The Federal College Work Study Program provides on-campus employment for 
eligible undergraduate students. These awards are based on need. 

Institutional Work Study positions are offered on a limited basis to students with 
specific skills. These awards are not based on need. 

Scholarships 

The following list includes many of the scholarships available to Armstrong students. 
This listing is intended for reference only and is not an exhaustive source of all funds 
available. 

ASC Alumni Association Scholarship: Open to all full-time students. Participation 
in civic and campus organizations, financial need, and academic standing are considered. 

Scholarships include full and partial awards and applications are available each 
winter quarter for awards made in the spring. Scholarships include The Arthur M. 
Gignilliat Entering Freshman Scholarship, The Judge Grady & Sara M. Memorial Schol- 
arship, Class of 1937 Scholarship and others. For more information on specific scholarship 
criteria, contact the Office of Alumni Affairs. 

Savannah Jaycees: Full scholarship for full-time Chatham County residents. Civic 
and community involvement, financial need and academic standing are considered. For 
additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

American Assn. of University Women: Open to older women in non-traditional 
fields with a 3.0 GPA, who are Chatham County residents. For additional information, 
contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Billy Bond Memorial Scholarship: Open to all students with 3.0 GPA. Civic and 
community involvement are considered. For additional information, contact the Finan- 
cial Aid Office. 

Elizabeth Wilmot Bull Scholarship: Offered by the Council on Auxiliaries of the 
Georgia Hospital Association. Students in the two and four year nursing programs who 
are Georgia residents are eligible to apply. For additional information, contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Chemistry & Physics Faculty Scholarship: Open to all students. Academic standing 
is considered. For additional information, contact the Chemistry & Physics Department. 

Civitan Club of Savannah Scholarship: Open to all students with a documented 
handicap or disability (to include learning disabilities). Students planning careers 
working with the disabled will also be considered. Contact the Financial Aid Office for 
more information. 

Ross E. Clark Scholarship: Full-time student majoring in Political Science with an 
overall 3.0 GPA, or entering freshman with 1200 SAT. For additional information, contact 
Professor Gross, History Department. 

Cooper Scholarship: Open to all undergraduate females and majors (except law, 
theology, and medicine) based on financial need. Requires B average and good standing. 
Application deadline April 15. For additional information, contact First Union Bank. 

ASC Engineering Society Scholarship: Full-time sophomore and junior engineering 
students, 2.75 GPA and active member of Engineering Society. For additional informa- 
tion, contact the Chemistry & Physics Department. 

ASC Freshmen Engineering Scholarship: Entering freshmen with engineering ma- 
jor. For additional information, contact the Chemistry & Physics Department. 

Coastal Empire Pathology Services Scholarship: Full-time Medical Technology 
senior. For additional information, contact the ASC Medical Technology Department. 

Gibson/Hamilton Memorial Scholarship: Sponsored by the Candler Hospital Aux- 
iliary. Students in the allied medical field who have at least a 3.0 GPA are eligible to apply. 
For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



C urtis (.. M. lines Nulling Scholarship: Hs\ \ in sine, si holarship for lull turn- junior. 

senior, and graduate students with C or highei average Residents of Southeast 4 ><■> 
Financial need is considered lor additional information, contact Ge o r g i a Southern 
c ollege i oundation ln< 

Sarah Milk Hodge Memorial Scholarship; Awarded to hill timet hathami ounty 

students for scholasti< merit Requires I.0GPA i-or additional information, iontait the 
Financial Aid t )ffice 

Memorial Medical Center Auxiliary Nursing Scholarship: ADN 01 BSN Georgia 

resident \% ith 2 5 high school GPA and i 750 SA I si ores it already a nursing student 

must have a t least 2.5 GPA. lor additional information, contact Memorial Medical 

Center 

Kiwanis Memorial Educational Fund: Full-time entering freshmen 1 lieji achievers 

For additional information, contact Office of Admissions 

Menzel-Magnus Award for Scholarship In Criminal Justice: Awarded to Criminal 
lustice senior with highest academic average. For additional information, contact the 
Department ot Government 

Paderewski Scholarship/Loan Program: Dental Hygiene. Must be Georgia resident 
Financial need is considered. For additional information, contact the Dental Hygiene 
Department. 

Savannah Foods and Industries Engineering Scholarship: Awarded to engineering 
students with demonstrated academic potential. Contact the Director of Engineering 
Studies. 

Savannah Pathology Laboratory Scholarship: Full-time Medical Technology senior. 
For additional information, contact the ASC Medical Technology Department. 

Anthony Porter Scholarship: Academic standing, civic and community involvement 
are considered. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Savannah Scholarship for Radiologic Technologists: Full-time freshman or sopho- 
more Radiologic Technology major with 2.0 GPA. For additional information, contact the 
Radiologic Technology Department. 

Solomon's Lodge: Full-time students in top 30% of class and 900 SAT. Civic and 
community involvement and financial need are considered. For additional information, 
contact Solomon's Lodge No. 1. 

Regents Scholarship: Georgia residents in the top 25% of their class. For additional 
information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Rotary Club of Savannah Scholarship: Full-time students with 3.0 GPA. For addi- 
tional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Savannah Volunteer Guards Scholarship: Full-time freshmen with high school GPA 
of 3.0 and 1000 SAT. Recipient must take three quarters of military science for duration 
of scholarship. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Ty Cobb Scholarship: Students must have completed 45 hours with B average and be 
Georgia residents. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of Georgia Scholarship Foundation: Full-time students, 
academic standing (3.0 GPA), civic and community involvement and financial need are 
considered. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

WOW - Women of Worth: Full-time student who is an active WOW member. For 
additional information, contact the Psychology Department. 

Government Benefits 

Social Security provides monthly benefits to children when a parent dies, starts 
receiving Social Security retirement, or starts receiving disability benefits. Because of 
changes in the law, students should contact the Social Security Office concerning 
eligibility. 



50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Program provides financial assistance for the 
applicant who possesses an impairment which would prove to be a vocational handicap. 
Students who think that they may qualify under this program should contact the 
Vocational Rehabilitation Center. Applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or 
other community agencies must apply at least six weeks before the beginning of any 
quarter to insure proper processing of applications. 

Veterans Benefits 

V.A. Educational Benefits may be used for study at Armstrong. Contact the Veterans 
Affairs Counselor in the Registrar/ Admissions Office for specific instructions on appli- 
cation procedures. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Congress in 1980, mandates that 
institutions of higher education establish minimum standards of "satisfactory progress" 
for students receiving financial aid. To receive financial aid at Armstrong, a student must 
both maintain a satisfactory grade point average and be making satisfactory academic 
progress as outlined below. These requirements apply to the following programs: Pell 
Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work Study, Guaranteed 
Student Loans, PLUS Loans, Georgia Incentive Grant, and other State Student Incentive 
Grants. 

It is the student's responsibility to read and understand Armstrong's policy regarding 
Standards of Academic Progress. Failure to understand and adhere to these policies will 
result in a student's ineligibility for aid. 

(1) Students must earn the following minimum number of hours each academic year fall 
through spring quarters) depending upon their enrollment status: 

(a) Full-time students - 36 hrs. per academic year (12 hrs per quarter) 

(b) 3/4 time students - 27 hrs. per academic year (9 hrs. per quarter) 

(c) 1/2 time students - 18 hrs. per academic year (6 hrs. per quarter) 

(d) Less and 1 /2 time students must satisfactorily complete all coursework they 
attempt. 

Students whose enrollment status varies during the year should follow the 
quarterly requirements listed above. For example, a student who enrolls full-time 
the first two quarters but onlv 3/4 the third quarter would be required to complete 
33 hours (12 + 12 + 9 = 33). ' 

Student records will be checked each year for compliance at the end of spring 
quarter. Students who are not meeting the above requirements will be considered 
ineligible for further aid until the appropriate number of hours are earned. 
Grade of A,B,C,D, and P will be considered as credits earned. F,I,W,WF, and U will 
not be considered as credits earned. 

(2) Students who are enrolled full-time will be expected to complete their degree within 
five years. No students will be eligible for aid if they have attempted 225 hours or 
more. Students; are therefore cautioned against repeating too many courses. 

(3) In addition to earning an appropriate number of hours per year, students must 
maintain the following grade point average. 



HOURS ATTEMPTED 


REQUIRED GPA 


0-15 


1.3 


16-30 


1.4 


31 -45 


1.5 


46-60 


1.6 


61-75 


1.7 


76-90 


1.8 


91 - 120 


1.9 


121 - over 


2.0 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 51 



c iraduate students must maintain s I ( SPA to remain eligible t»»r aid 

(4) Students who are enrolled in me Developmental Studies p r o gra m will follow the 
regulationsoJ thai program Students will be required to meet alISatisfa< tory Progress 

..illations upon completing the requirement, oi tin- Develo pm ental Studies Pro 
gram Suspension mom Developmental 
studies makes a student Ineligible tor further aid. 

(5) [ransfer students musl be In £o<.k\ standing to receive the initial disbursement of aid. 
Credit hours attempted at other institutions will be considered in the 22^ hour 
maximum. Other Satisfactory Progre ss calculations will consider only the student's 
academic record at Armstrong State College. 

Reinstatement of Aid 

The reinstatement ot aid is dependent on the availability of funds. 
( 1 ) Students whose aid is terminated because they failed to earn the required number of 

hours may request their aid be reinstated once they earn the required number of hours. 

These hours must be earned at Armstrong and may be earned during the summer or 

during the following year. The student is not eligible for aid during these "catch up" 

quarters. 
(2) Students whose aid is terminated due to insufficient GPA or standing may request 

their aid be reinstated once they have attended at least one quarter at full-time status 

and receive at least a 2.0 GPA. The student must also meet the GPA requirements listed 

above. 

Appeal of Aid Suspension 

Students who feel that they can demonstrate mitigating circumstances which affected 
their academic progress may make an appeal to the Dean of Academic and Enrollment 
Services. 



52 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 






Academic Advisement 

All students are required to participate in the advisement system at Armstrong State 
College. The Vice President and Dean of Faculty gives overall direction to the advisement 
program, with the appropriate department heads coordinating advisement activities 
with the various departments. Academic advisement is available as follows: 

1) The Advisement Center - Second floor, Lane Library 

* All undecided majors 

*A11 students with CPC deficiencies in science, social science, or foreign language. 
*Please come to the Advisement Center for an appointment. 

2) The Developmental Studies Office — Memorial Center Annex 
*A11 students with CPC deficiencies in math and English. 

* All students currently enrolled in a Developmental Studies class. 

""Contact the Developmental Studies Department to make arrangements for 
advisement. 

3) Departmental Offices 

*A11 students who have declared a major or who have selected a pre-professional 

program. 
""Appointments are to be made with departmental advisors. 

English Composition and Mathematics Requirements 

See English Composition and Mathematics Requirements in the Degree Requirements 
Section of this catalog, where important requirements are outlined for entering students. 

State Requirement in History and Government 

See State Requirement in History and Government in the Degree Requirements 
Section of this catalog. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students is 1 5-1 8 quarter hours including a course 
in physical education during the freshman and sophomore years. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is registered for 12 or more hours. A 
part-time student is one registered for fewer than 12 quarter hours. A student should 
plan about ten hours preparation per week for each 5 quarter hour course. 

Classification of Students 

A student who has earned fewer than 45 quarter hours will be classified as a freshman; 
between 45 and 89 a sophomore; between 90 and 134 as a junior; and 135 or more as a 
senior. 

Overloads and Courses at Other Colleges 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be granted by the Registrar 
to a student: 

1. with an average grade of "B" for full-time enrollment in the preceding quarter, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter hours. A student who 
is on academic probation will not be permitted to register for more than 18 quarter hours. 
Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the appropriate Dean. 

A student enrolled at Armstrong who at the same time takes courses for credit at 
another college may not transfer such credit to Armstrong, unless written permission 
from the appropriate Dean has been obtained. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 55 



Grade Reports 

c irade reports are issued dire* tly to students at the end ol ea< h quartet 1 he following 
grades are used in the determination oi grade point a> 
rode I lotun Points 

\ (excellent) 

B (good) *.0 

satisfactory) 2.0 

D (passing) 1.0 

f (failure) 0.0 

\\ 1 (withdrew, failing) 0.0 

["he cumulative GPA is determined by dividing the total honor points earned by the 
total hours attempted at Armstrong State College. The adjusted GPA is determined bj 
dividing the total honor points earned by the total hours attempted, with hours and honor 
points tor repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation. 

Armstrong State College also uses the following symbols tor grade reports. These 
Symbols carry no honor points and are not included in the determination ot either 
the cumulative GPA or the adjusted GPA. 

Symbol Explanation 

W withdrew, no penalty 

1 in progress or incomplete 

S satisfactory 

U unsatisfactory 

V audit 

K credit by examination 

P passing 

NR not reported 

An "I" which has not been removed by the middle of the succeeding quarter is 
changed to an "F" unless the instructor recommends an extension in writing addressed 
to the appropriate Dean. The "S" and "U" symbols may be utilized for completion of 
degree requirements other than academic course work (such as student teaching, clinical 
practice, etc.). A "WF" (Withdrew, Failing) is recorded for any student withdrawing after 
the mid-term date. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Dean of the School 
in which the course is taught and will be approved only on the basis of hardship. Appeals 
tor a change of grade may be initiated through the head of the appropriate academic 
department in accordance with the Regulation* of Armstrong State College. 

Grade Appeals 

A student who contests a grade will have the following line of appeal: 

1. The student will discuss the contested grade with the instructor involved. 

2. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will meet with the department 
head and the instructor. If the grade dispute is with the department head, the 
student will meet with the dean of the school and the department head. A 
"memorandum for the record" will be prepared which will include the substance 
of the conversations during the meeting. 

3. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will present his or her appeal 
in writing to the department head or the dean of the school, as applicable, who will 
then appoint a review board to hear the appeal. The student will initiate this step 
prior to midterm of the quarter after the grade was received (except if the student 
plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being appealed is a 
prerequisite — see "4" below). 

a. The review board will consist of the department head or the dean of the school, 
as applicable, and two members of the department, not including the instructor 
involved. In small departments, membership may come from outside the 
department. 



56 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



b. The review board shall hear statements from both the student and the instructor 
involved and will examine documents that are pertinent to the matter under 
review. 

c. The review board will hear the grade appeal and present its findings to the vice 
president and dean of faculty prior to the last week of the quarter. 

4. If the student plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being 
appealed is a prerequisite, then the following timetable will be met at the first of 
that quarter: 

a. If a grade appeal is not resolved with the instructor concerned, then the student 
will file an appeal in writing with the department head (or the dean of the school 
if the grade dispute is with the department head). This step will be taken by the 
second day of the quarter. 

b. The review board to hear the appeal will be appointed by the third day of the 
quarter. If department members are not available to form a review board, the 
dean of the school, in consultation with the department head, will appoint a 
review board. 

c. The review board will hear and complete the grade appeal by the fifth day of the 
quarter, and present its findings to the vice president and dean of faculty. 

d. If the appeal to the vice president and dean of faculty is denied, the student will 
be disenrolled from the course in question. 

5. If the vice president and dean of faculty denies the appeal, the student may 
continue the appeal to the president. 

6. The Board of Regents will not accept or consider appeals based on academic grades. 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten quarter hours of course work who earn 
an honor point average of at least 3.6 will be placed on the Dean's List. Only course work 
taken at Armstrong will be used in the computation of Dean's List honors. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.2 through 
3.499 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.5 
through 3.799 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.8 
through 4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other accredited institutions will be considered 
in computing honors for graduation. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect of attendance on the; 
grades in a course are left to the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, discussed, or 
lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all assigned reading. A student is also 
responsible for submitting on time all assignments and tests, recitations and unannounced 
quizzes. 

The instructor will be responsible for informing each class at its first meeting what 
constitutes excessive absence in that particular class. Each student is responsible for 
knowing the attendance regulation and for complying with it. An instructor may drop a 
student from any class with a grade of " W" or "WF," as appropriate, if in the instructor's 
judgment the student's absences have been excessive. 

Academic Standing 

The college recognizes four academic categories: Good Standing, Good Standing with 
Warning, Academic Probation, and Academic Suspension. Students are expected tc 
maintain or exceed the grade point average (GPA) as indicated in the chart below. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 57 



Quarter Hours Attempted Required Adjusted 
it Armstrong and I Isewherc GPA 

0-15 i I 

16 W ! i 

H-45 1.5 

16 60 1.6 

61 5 1.7 

90 1.8 

91 120 I 9 

i:i mk\ over 2.0 

A student who t.i 1 1^ below the required GPA for the tirst time is pL^ fel on Good 
Standing with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted c IPA to the required level during the 
next quarter will result in Academic Probation. Students on Academic Probation are not 
in( ^ok\\ Standing. It the student's adjusted ( IPA is raised to the required level, the student 
is returned toGood Standing. Hie second or any subsequent failure to meet the required 
GPA will result in Academic Probation. In order to participate in extracurricular activities 
endorsed by the college, students must be in Good Standing or Good Standing with 
Warning. Students under warning should plan both curricular and extracurricular 
activities under the guidance ot their advisors. 

Students on Academic Probation who fail to achieve the required adjusted GPA, 
but who do earn an average of at least 2.0 during the probationary quarter, will be 
continued on Academic Probation for the next quarter of attendance. Students on 
Academic Probation who neither achieve the required adjusted GPA nor earn at least 
a 2.0 average during the probationary quarter will be placed on Academic Suspension 
from the college for one quarter. A student on Academic Suspension for the first time 
has the option of attending summer school without having to appeal the suspension. 
I lowever, a student who fails to make satisfactory progress as a result of summer 
school will have to appeal for readmission in the fall quarter. 

A student suspended for academic reasons for the first or second time may appeal 
bv letter to the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing. This letter should 
state the nature of any extenuating circumstances relating to the academic deficiency, 
and must be delivered to the office of the Dean of Academic and Enrollment Services no 
later than 9 AM of registration day. The Committee on Admissions and Academic 
Standing will make a recommendation to the President and the decision of the President 
is tinal. 

A student re-entering the college after an Academic Suspension is placed on Academic 
Probation and must meet the requirements listed above. A third Academic Suspension 
is final. 

Repeating Courses 

Any course may be repeated with the last grade to be counted in the adjusted GPA. A 
student who repeats any course should complete a "Notice of Course Repetition" form 
available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Dropping Courses 

A student desiring to drop a course after the quarter has begun must obtain a 
Drop-Add Notice in the Office of the Registrar. The notice must be signed by the 
instructor of the course being dropped and returned by the student to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

A student who drops a course within the first seven days will receive a grade of "W" 
for the course. A student who drops a course after the first seven class days and on or 
. before the quarterly dates listed for mid-terms will receive a "W" or a "WF" depending 
on the status in the course. A student may not drop a course without penalty following 






58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



the quarterly dates listed for mid-term. A student is not allowed to drop ENG 025, 101, 
102, or 201 at any time unless extenuating circumstances prevail. In order to drop one of 
these courses, the drop form must be authorized by the Dean of the School of Arts and 
Sciences or a designated representative. 

A Developmental Studies student who withdraws or is withdrawn from a Develop- 
mental Studies course will also be dropped from all five or more credit hour courses he/ 
she is taking that are numbered 101 or above. The student may, however, remain enrolled 
in other Developmental Studies courses and in courses carrying fewer than five credit 
hours. 



Withdrawing from College 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw from college must begin the process 
in the Office of Student Affairs. A formal withdrawal is required to ensure that the 
student is eligible to return to Armstrong State College at a future date. Any refund to 
which a student is entitled will be considered on the basis of the date which appears on 
the withdrawal form. 

Medical Withdrawals 

A student may be administratively withdrawn from the college when in the judgment 
of Vice President of Student Affairs and the college physician, if any, and after consulta- 
tion with the student's parents and personal physician, if any, it is determined that the 
student suffers from a physical, mental, emotional or psychological health condition 
which: (a) poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the 
person or property of others or (b) causes the student to interfere with the rights of other 



UR( 



members of the college community or with the exercise of any proper activities or s 
functions of the college or its personnel or (c) causes the student to be unable to meet 
institutional requirements for admission and continued enrollment, as defined in the 
student conduct code and other publications of the college. 

Except in emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded an 
appropriate hearing prior to final decision concerning his or her continued enroll- 
ment at the college. 






Auditing Courses 

A regular student wishing to audit a course without receiving credit must obtain 
permission of the instructor before registering for the course. During the registration 
process the student should request to audit. A student may not change from audit to 
credit status or from credit to audit status after completing the process of registration 
for a course. A student who audits a course will have a "V" recorded for that course. 
The regular schedule of fees applies to auditors. Unauthorized auditing is prohibited. No ; - ( 
student may audit a Developmental Studies course. 

inn 

i 
i 



Honor Code 



The Honor Code at Armstrong State College is dedicated to the proposition that the 
protection of the grading system is in the interest of the student community. The 
Student Court is an institutional means to assure that the student community shall 
have primary disposition of infractions of the Honor Code and that students accused of 
such infractions shall enjoy those procedural guarantees traditionally considered es- 
sential to fair and impartial hearing, the foremost of which is the presumption of 
innocence until guilt be established beyond a reasonable doubt. 
I. Responsibilities of students: 

All students must agree to abide by the rules of the Honor Code. A student shall not t 

be accepted at Armstrong State College unless he or she signs a statement affirming 

ai 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



his understanding ol this agreement i he I loner ( ode shall be printed in the < > 1 1 1 «- i.il 
bulletin aiui Students Illustrated. 

it will be the responsibility ol tin- Student Court of its designated re p re sen tative 
to conduct .»n orientation program .it the beginning ol each quarter t<>r .ill newly 
entering students to explain full) the I lonor ( ode and to allow tull discussion <>t its 
requirements. 

Am student desiring assistance with any matter related to tin- Honor c ode > s 
Invited to s^i assistance in tin- Office of Student Att.urs. 

II. Violations of the Honor Code: 

Violations ot the I lonor Code may be of two kinds: (a) general and (b) those related 
to the peculiarities ot specifu course-related problems and to the understanding ot 
individual instructors Any instructor whose conception ot cheating would tend to 
enlarge or contract the general regulations defining cheating must explicitly notify the 
affected students oi the qualifications to the general regulations which he or she wishes 
to stipulate. The following will be considered general violations of the Honor Code. 

1 . Giving or receiving an\' unauthorized help on any assignment, test or paper. The 
meaning ot unauthorized help shall be made clear by the instructor of each class. 

2. Stealing when related to cheating. 

3. Plagiarizing. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another's words or ideas. 
Students must be familiar with the explanation of plagiarism given in the writing 
handbook used in freshman composition classes (pp. 522 in the current text, 
Writing: A College Handbook, Heffernan and Lincoln, 1986). Ignorance of what 
constitutes plagiarism will not be accepted as an excuse for plagiarism. 

4. Giving perjured testimony before the Student Court. 

5. Suborning, attemption to suborn, or in intimidating witnesses. 

6. Failing to report a suspected violation of the Honor Code. 

III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code: 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may come to the Office of Student Affairs for 
assistance in contacting members of the Student Court. 

I A. Self-reporting: Students who have broken the Honor Code should report them- 
selves to a member of the Student Court. 
B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a violation of the Honor Code 
must report the matter. 

1. Tell persons thought to be guilty to report themselves to a member of the 
Student Court no later than the end of the next school day. After this designated 
time the person who is aware of the violation must inform a member of the 
Student Court so that the Student Court may contact the accused persons if they 
have not already reported themselves. 

2. Report the suspected violation directly to a member of the Student Court 
without informing the accused. 

IV. The procedural rights of the students accused of violations of the Honor Code: 

The essence of the procedural rights of the accused is the right to be presumed 
innocent until proven guilty. Specific rights are as follows: 

1. The accused will be notified in writing by the Student Court or its designated 
representative of the nature and details of the offense with which they are charged 
along with the names of their accusers and the principal witnesses to be brought 
against them. This notification shall occur no less than three days prior to the date 
of the hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel of their own choosing. Such counsel will not 
participate directly in the proceedings except to advise the client. It is expected that 
such counsel will be drawn from the college community. 

3. The accused and the person bringing the charges shall be afforded an opportunity 

I to present witnesses and documentary or other evidence. The accused and any 

individual bringing the charges shall have the right to cross examine all witnesses 
and may, where the witnesses cannot appear because of illness or other cause 



60 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



acceptable to the Court, present the sworn statement of the witnesses. The Court 
shall not be bound by formal rules governing the presentation of evidence, and it 
may consider any evidence presented which is of probative value in the case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear witness against themselves. The Court may 
not take the refusal of the accused to testify as evidence of guilt, but this proviso 
does not give the accused immunity from a hearing or from recommendations 
reached in a hearing simply because the accused does not testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a complete audiotape of the hearing and to the 
record prepared by the secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may be re-opened for consideration upon initiation 
of the accused acting through normal appeal channels. The accused shall not be put 
in double jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from the hearing room during the course of a 
hearing. Witnesses may not discuss a pending case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will be allowed such observers of the hearing as 
may be commensurate with the space available. Otherwise, in the interests of the 
right of privacy of the accused, hearings will be private, except that the College may 
also have observers additional to the advisors to the Student Court. 

V. The Student Conduct Committee, the Student Court and Advisors to the Student 
Court: 

A. Student Conduct Committee 

1 . The Student Conduct Committee shall be responsible to the faculty for recom- 
mending policies relating to the Academic Honor Code and the Code of 
Conduct, for formulating or approving rules, enforcement procedures, and 
sanctions within the framework of existing policies, and for recommending 
changes in the administration of any aspects of the Honor Code and the Student 
Code of Conduct. The Conduct Committee will also interview and select 
members for the Student Court. 

2. The Committee shall consist of five teaching faculty members, the Vice Presi- 
dent of Student Affairs and four students. The four students will be the 
President and Vice President of the Student Court, the President of the Student 
Government Association, and one student-at-large. The faculty members shall 
be appointed by the faculty in accordance with the faculty statutes. 

3. The Vice President of Student Affairs shall assist the Conduct Committee in the 
development of policy and in the discharge of its responsibilities. He or she shall 
coordinate the activities of all officials, committees, student groups, and tribu- 
nals for student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating to student conduct that are proposed by any 
College official, committee or student group, and for which sanctions may be 
imposed in the name of the College, must be submitted to the Committee for 
consideration and review prior to submission to the faculty and the student 
body. The Committee shall have 10 days in which to review the same. 

B. Student Court 

1 . The Student Court will be selected by the Student Conduct Committee and will 
be composed of twelve students. Due consideration will be given to equitable 
apportionment of court members on the basis of academic class, race, and sex. 
Students on academic probation may not serve. All appointments will be issued 
and accepted in writing. Appointments will be made during Spring Quarter ir 
time for newly elected members of the Court to assume their duties by May 1 
Appointments will be made as needed to keep the Student Court staffed to dc 
business on a reasonably prompt basis. These appointments may constitute 
permanent or temporary replacements as the Student Conduct Committee 
deems necessary. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 61 



i he Student ( ourl will elect a President. V Ice President and aSe retar) from its 
mem b ership I he President will preside at .ill meetings I in- V u e President will 
assunn- the duties ot tlu- President it the Presidenl la abaenl I he Sei retary will 
maintain written notes o( .ill p r oc e eding and audiotape records oi .ill testi 
mon) and will maintain exhibits of evidence which by their n.iturv may 
reasonabl) be maintained In the Court riles A quorum ol tlu- c ourl ahall consist 
of seven members. A two-thirds majority se<. ret ballot vote la required to rea< h 
a finding oi guilty. All other questions may bede< Ided by a simple majority vote 

3. Constituency oi the Student c ourl during the Summer Quarter shall Include all 

appointed members in attendance, and others shall be appointed to member- 
ship by the student Conduct Committee 

4. Student Court members shall examine their consciences caretullv to determine 
whether they can in good conscience serve on a panel hearing a particular case, 
and in the event that there is any doubt whatsoever, such members shall e\i use 
themselves mom duty on the specific panel in question. 

C. Advisors to the Court 

1. An advisor and an associate advisor to the Student Court shall be appointed by 
the President of the College. 

2. Ordinarily the advisor will serve in that office for one year only and usually will 
be succeeded in that position by the associate advisor. Therefore, after the initial 
appointments, only an associate advisor will ordinarily be appointed each year. 
The succession of an associate to the advisor position is deemed to occur on the 
last day of Spring Quarter. If, for any reason, the advisor is unable to complete 
his or her term, the associate advisor shall succeed to the office of advisor and 
another associate advisor shall be appointed by the above procedures. If, during 
the Summer Quarter, neither advisor is on campus, a temporary advisor will be 
appointed. 

3. Duties of the advisor and the associate advisor: It shall- be the duty of the 
advisor to consult with the Court and to offer advice to the President and 
members of the Court on substantive and procedural questions. The advisor, or 
the associate advisor in the event the advisor is unable to attend, shall be present 
at all meetings and hearings of the Court. The advisor may not vote or 
participate directly in the conduct at hearings before the Court except through 
the chair, or acting chair, of the Court. The advisor should be governed at all 
times by the principle that a hearing before the Student Court is primarily a 
matter of student responsibility. 

VL Procedures and Penalties adopted by the Student Court. 

The Student Court shall formulate its own bylaws governing internal organization 
and procedure. Such bylaws must be consistent with the Honor Code. 

A. Hearings shall be called by the Court President to be held on a date not less than 
three nor more than ten class days after notice to the accused as provided in Section 
IV-2. Exceptions to these time requirements may be granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the Court shall make a recommendation to the 
Vice-President of the College as to the administrative action it deems appropriate 
within the following limitations: 

1 . A minimum penalty shall be loss of assignment or test credit for the assignment 
or test for violations involving cheating as specified in Section II, subsections 1, 
2, and 3. 

Additional penalties such as reprimands, suspension, or others may be recom- 
mended for any aspects of Section II. 

2. Maximum penalty for a first offense of any type shall be suspension for a full 
calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second offense may be suspension for three years. 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Immediately following a hearing, the accused will be informed of the Court's 
finding, and its recommendation to the Vice President /Dean of Faculty. If the 
finding is guilty, the accused will be informed that the Court may reopen the case 
with the consent of the accused for good cause, within a three week period. 

D. The Vice President/ Dean of Faculty will inform all involved persons in writing 
of the action taken in view of Court recommendation. The Court Secretary will 
post public notice of the Vice President's action by case number without identify- 
ing the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalties: 

Should students have cause to question the findings of the Court or the action of the 
Vice President of the College or both, they have the right to appeal. The channels of 
appeal are as follows: 

A. Court findings and /or the administrative action of the Vice President of the 
College may be appealed within five days by writing the President of the College. 
Further appeal procedures will conform to the appeal procedures of the College 
and of the Policies of the Board of Regents, University System of Georgia. 
VIII. Supervision of the Student Court: 

As an institutional means of responding to reported infractions of the Honor Code, 
the Student Court is ultimately responsible to the President of the College. 

Supervision of the Student Court will be accomplished ordinarily through the Vice 
President for Student Affairs and the Advisors. 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, of the College Statutes, the Vice President 
for Student Affairs will provide general supervision of the Student Court and will 
provide other guidance or services as directed by the President of the College. 
DC Revision of the Honor Code will require confirmation by the majority vote of those 
faculty and student body members voting. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS j 

General Degree Requirements 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the degree program 
chosen in accordance with the regulations of the college catalog. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted only with the written 
approval of the appropriate Dean, upon the recommendation of the department or 
division head. However, all exceptions to the core curriculum requirements must 
have the approval of the Vice President and Dean of Faculty. 

3. A student will normally graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission 
to the College. In the School of Health Professions, a student will graduate under the 
catalog in effect at the time of admission or readmission (whichever is more current) 
to a particular Health Professions program. In the Division of Education, a student will 
graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission to the teacher education 
program. Armstrong State College, however, reserves the right to change any provi- 
sion listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for 
graduation, without actual notice to individual students. If students have been absent 
from the College for two or more consecutive years, they should expect to meet all 
requirements in effect at the time of return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may consist of courses 
taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. No correspondence courses may 
be used to meet the requirements in the major field or related fields for the Bachelor's 
degree or in English composition or foreign language. No correspondence courses 
may be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval of the appropriate 
Dean and the head of the department in which the student is majoring. 

5. By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



I Uaton ind Go v er nm ent ind kn Georgii Hiator) ind Government a itudenl it 

Armstrong State ( ollege ma) demonstrate such proficiency b\ 

\ Examinations. For 1 S. and Geor g ia Govern m e n t CLEP: American < neiti 

and local teat on Georgia constitution; foi i S ind Georgia Histon the relevant 

CLEP \dvanced Placement i<-st, 01 c ollege \u>.ui\ Admiasioi 

v im-\ ement i est 
B Credit In certain courses Fori S. and Georgia government Political Science 113; 

fori s and <. ieorgia i J l^tor \ Histor) 251 <>t 252 oi an) uppei division coui 

l S Histon 
j i o qualif) tor the ba< ^ alaureate degree, a student must earn at Armstrong .it least 4^ 
quarter hours ot credit applicable toward the degree. Additionally, the student must 
complete successfull) at Armstrong at least halt ol the upper division i redits required 
in the major field oi study, lor students m teacher education programs, the major Held 
oi study is the teaching Held. For the Assoc late I tegree, the student must i omplete at 

least 4^ quarter hours ol COUTSe work at Armstrong state C ollege Armstrong students 
enrolled in the cooperative degree programs with Savannah State College in Business 
Education may be exempted from these requirements by a recommendation ot the 
1 lead of the Division of Education, concurrence by the Education Curriculum Com- 
mittee and approval of the Committee on Academic Standing. 
For graduation the student must earn an overall average of 2.0 or better considering 
work taken at all colleges, computed in such manner that a course will be counted only 
once, regardless of the number of times that it has been repeated. The grade earned in 
the last attempt will determine the number of honor points assigned for graduation 
Additionally, the student must earn a GPA of 2.0 or better in each of the following: 

A. All work at Armstrong 

B. All courses in the major field. 

8. To qualify for a second Armstrong baccalaureate degree, a candidate must earn at 
Armstrong at least 45 additional hours of credit and meet all qualitative requirements 
tor the degree. 

9. Before a degree will be conferred students must pay all fees and must submit to the 
Registrar a completed Application for Graduation two quarter* before graduation. A 
candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the President, Vice President and 
Dean of Faculty, Vice President of Student Affairs, or Dean of Academic and Enrollment 
Services, must attend the graduation exercises at which a degree is to be conferred 

10. All students must successfully complete the Regents' Test and must take an Exit 
Examination in their major field as may be stipulated as requirements for graduation 
Candidates for a second baccalaureate degree are exempted from the Regents' Test 
requirement. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

Each unit in the University System of Georgia requires as a Core Curriculum for all 
baccalaureate degree programs the following minimum number of quarter hours in the 

major areas of study. 

Hours 
Area I 

Humanities, including, but not limited to, grammar & composition & literature 20 

Area II 

Mathematics & the natural sciences, including, but not limited to, 

mathematics and a 10-hour sequence of laboratory courses in the 

biological or physical sciences 20 

Area HI 

Social Sciences, including, but not limited to, history & American government 20 

Area IV 

Courses appropriate to the major field of the individual student .30 

TOTAL 90 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



I 






In addition to the University System Core Curriculum requirements as outlined 
above, Armstrong State College requires six quarter hours in physical education as part 
of all baccalaureate degree programs. 

Goals for the Core Curriculum 

The core curriculum is the heart of undergraduate education at Armstrong. The 
following is a statement of the goals that all students should achieve once they have 
completed their core courses. It defines what the college expects of its students and what 
it tries to accomplish in its general education courses. 

What does it mean to be an educated human being? The fundamental goals of all education are 
tzvo-fold: the inculcation of a body of knowledge and values, and development of the skills necessary 
to acquire and judge them. The areas of the core curriculum address these goals by asking and 
exploring the following questions. 

Area I: How do human beingss define their humanity? 

In what works and by what means have we most fully expressed our humanity? How 
do we judge these? 

The courses in this area seek to give students an appreciation and understanding 
of human culture and expression, developing their aesthetic, imaginative, empathetic, 
and intellectual powers. In addition, these courses propose to instruct students in the 
methods and language of scholarly and critical discourse. 

The objectives of these courses are to help students 

— Read and write effectively 

— Conduct library research with efficiency and integrity 

— Support and defend an interpretation by gathering information, reasoning from 
it, generalizing and reaching conclusions 

— Develop a vocabulary to discuss the elements of one of the arts 

— Express an understanding of one of the arts in critical essays 

— Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between art and culture 

Area II: What is the relationship between human beings and the universe? 

How do we use its resources wisely? What is the appropriate language to use in 
discussing and modeling the natural phenomena that we observe? How do we build 
conceptual models of our own? 

The courses in this area have the common objective of increasing the students' ability 
to understand and participate in scientific and technical discourse by providing the 
student with some of the specific knowledge of mathematics and natural sciences that is 
presumed in that discourse. 

In addition to knowledge-based objectives, the courses have the additional objectives 
of helping students to 

— Acquire skills in observing natural phenomena, thereby increasing understand- 
ing of the universe 

— Develop an understanding of the scientific method and its impact on modern 
thought 

— Develop skills in reading and understanding quantitative, scientific, and technical 
information 

— Acquire skills in extracting the essence of a problem from its verbal statement and 
applying the appropriate scientific and mathematical tools to solve the problem 

Area III: What are the relationships between human beings and their Institutions? 

The courses of this area seek to give students a comprehension of human behavior and 
institutions as these merge from social and historical relationships. In addition, they 
propose to instruct students in the basic language and methods of social, political, and 
historical discourse and to inculcate a sense of openness and tolerance that comes from 
the examination of diverse values and perspectives. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 65 



1 in- objet lives oi these courses are to help students 

— Demonstrate 1 1 omprehension oi social relationships and Institutions and theii 
Jr\ elopmenl 

— Communicate with clarity about social relationships and institutions and theii 
de\ elopmenl 

— Identify basic features o! human so< lal relationships and problems 

— Develop competence In regard to making positive < ontributions toward soli 
social problems 

— Demonstrate an understanding oi both t lu- uniqueness oi individuals and the 
complexity oi colta tive human experience as pen eived through history and the 
so*, lal k iences 

Regents' Testing Program 

Each institution oi the l niversit) System of Georgia shall assure the other institutions, 
t uul the System as a whole, thai students obtaining a degree from thai institution possess 

certain minimum skills ol reading and writing. The Regents' Testing Program has been 
de\ eloped to help in the attainment of this goal The objectives ot the Testing Program art' 
{ l ) to provide Systemwide information on the status of student competence in the areas 
of reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying those students 
who tail to attain the minimum levels oi competence in the areas of reading and writing. 

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate 
degree shall pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for graduation. Students must take the 
Test in the quarter after they have completed 60 quarter credit hours if they have not taken 
it previously. Each institution shall provide an appropriate program of remediation and 
shall require students who have earned 75 quarter credit hours and have not passed the 
Test to enroll in the appropriate remedial course or courses until they pass the Tesi 
Students with bO or more college-level credit hours transferring from System programs 
that do not require the Regents' Test or from institutions outside the System shall take the 
Test no later than the second quarter of enrollment in a program leading to the baccalau- 
reate degree and in subsequent quarters shall be subject to all provisions of this policv. 

The Regents' Test is not a requirement for an Associate of Applied Science Degree or 
an Associate of Science degree in an allied health field, although institutions mav choose 
to require the Test for these degrees. (Armstrong State College has chosen to require the 
Test of all undergraduates who have not earned a baccalaureate or higher degree 
regardless of degree objective.) 

A student holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionallv accredited 
institution of higher education will not be required to complete the Regents' Test in 
order to receive a degree from a University System institution. 

The Chancellor will issue administrative procedures for the operation of the 
Regents' Testing Program. (A copy of Regents' Testing Program Administrative 
Procedures is available from the Office of Student Affairs, Room 11, Administration 
Building.) 

According to "Regents' Testing Program Administration Procedures" institutions 
may increase requirements related to the Regents' Testing Program "provided that 
such increased requirements are authorized by the Chancellor and ... published in the 
official catalog of the institution prior to implementation." 

Regents' Test: Administration and Remediation Requirements 

Students attending Armstrong State College are urged to take the Regents' Test during 
their first quarter of enrollment after the quarter in which the 45th credit hour is earned . 
For the purpose of enforcing Regents' Testing Program Policy, enrolled students are 
identified by computer printed notices on end-of-quarter grade reports and transfers 
through the processes of admission and transcript evaluation. Students register for the 
Test at the Office of Student Affairs within the publicized test registration period. 






66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Students who neglect to take the Regents' Test until their first quarter of enrollment 
after the quarter in which the 60th credit hour is earned may be barred from all phases 
of registration until after Test scores are posted. 

Regardless of credit hours earned, students who do not pass the Regents' Test may 
be required by Armstrong State College to take remedial courses before they retake the 
Regents' Test. In accordance with Regents' Testing Program Policy, students who have 
not passed the Test and who have earned 75 quarter hours must take remedial courses, 
whether or not they have attempted the test. 

Students who fail the reading portion of the Regents' Test and who have less than 
75 hours earned with an adjusted GPA of 2.5 or better may appeal the requirement for 
Developmental Studies Reading 025 (Developing Reading Maturity) to the Dean of 
Academic and Enrollment Services. 

Students who fail the essay portion of the Test and have less than 75 hours earned 
with an adjusted GPA of 3.0 or better and a 3.0 or better in required core courses in 
English may appeal the requirement for English 025 (Composition Review) to the 
Head of the Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Regents' Test: Special Categories of Students 

Students whose native language is not English must take the reading component of the 
Regents' Test, but may take a college examination to certify competence in writing. The 
college equivalent of the essay component of the Regents' Test is administered on the 
same date as the reading component of the Test. International students are allowed two 
hours for each test. 

Students who are handicapped may request additional time for the Regents' Test. 

Regents' Test: Essay Review 

Students may request a formal review of failure on the essay component of the 
Regents' Test if the essay received at least one passing score and the review is initiated 
by mid-term of the first quarter of enrollment following testing and no more than one 
year from the quarter in which the failure occurred. Only reviews processed in the first 
two weeks of a quarter will be answered before the next Regents' Test. Students may 
initiate an essay review at the Office of Student Affairs. 

Regents' Test: Health Professions Program Requirement 

Before a student in a Health Professions program may enter his/her last quarter, he/ 
she must have passed the Regents' examination. 

Physical Education Requirements 

All students who are enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs for ten or more 
quarter hours on the daytime schedule must adhere to Armstrong Core Curriculum Area 
V requirements. Any student who holds a valid life guarding certificate or a valid water 
safety instructor certificate or passes the Armstrong swimming test may be exempted 
from PE 103 or PE 108. Physical education is not required of anyone who is beyond the 
age of 25 at the time of initial matriculation at Armstrong or of anyone enrolled primarily 
in evening classes. 

Students should check their program of study for P.E. 117 and /or 166 requirements. 

English and Mathematics Placement 

During the initial quarters of enrollment at Armstrong State College, students must 
enroll in the appropriate sequence of English composition courses until the sequence 
has been completed and /or the Regents' Test has been passed. Students must not delay 
this sequence beyond their second quarter of attendance. For assistance in identifying 
the appropriate English composition courses, students should consult advisors in the 
departments of their declared majors or the Office of Admissions, or the Department of 



If 



I anguages l iterature ind I fcramatk Aits Sec i in] i terator s ind I >r. unati 

Department foi furthei Information 

l he( ollege reserves the right to place ttudenta in a pp rop ri ate English and math 

u | .our si-s m the COW ainuiiliiiii 1 HagpOStk teStfl axe ad minister ril r * >r this pur pus.- 

State Requirement In History and Government 

in State la* each studertf who receives ■ diploma of certificate from ■ school 

supported by the State oi Georgia must demonstrate proficiency In i nited states 
History And Government and in Georgia History and Go v er nm ent A student at 
Armstrong state College may demonstrate such proficienc) b) 

A. Examinations fori S and Georgia Government CLEP Americ an Go v e rnm e nt 
and local test on the Georgia constitution; for is and Georgia History the relevant 
CLEP, Advanced Placement Test, or College Board Admissions resting Program 
Achievement 1 est 

B. Credit in certain courses. For U.S. and Georgia government Political Si lent ell3; 
tor U S and Georgia History - History 251 or 252 or any upper division OOUfM m I s 
1 [istory. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of 
Science Degrees 

Requirements for each major program leading to the degree of Bachelor oi Arts with 
I major in Art, English, History, Music, Political Science, Psychology, or to the degree 
p| Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, or 
Mathematical Sciences are described in the appropriate departmental listing. For the BA 
and the BS degrees, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of the required physical 
education courses, is required for graduation. An exit exam is also required. 

Each student in one of these major programs must complete the 90-hour core 
curriculum requirement as listed above, along with the 6-hour Physical Education 
requirement. 

Students will not be allowed to take senior division courses in the major field unless 
they have a minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses in that field. No major 
program in a department will require more than 60 quarter hours at all levels in the major 
field; however, the department may recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 

For its major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours oi 
specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and may require language 
courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. Total require- 
ments in the major and related fields, may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Each BA or BS degree program, except those designed for Dental Hygiene, Medical 
Technology, Nursing and teacher certification, will include a minimum of 15 hours oi 
electives approved for credit within the Armstrong State College curriculum. 

Associate Degree Requirements 

Each associate degree program includes as part of its curriculum the following: 

ENG101,102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

MAT 101 5 

POS113 5 

One five hour course selected from 
Areas I, II, or III of the Baccalaureate 

Core 5 

Three PE credit hours 3 

TOTAL 33 



68 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Students in associate degree programs are required to complete successfully the 
Regents' Examination and may be required to take an Exit Examination in the appropri- 
ate area of concentration. 

Numbering System for Courses 

In the course listing to follow, there appear three numbers in parentheses after each 
course title. The first number listed indicates the number of hours of lecture; the second 
number listed indicates the number of hours of laboratory; the third number listed 
indicates the number of quarter hours of credit carried by the course. The letter "V" 
represents variable hours. 

Courses numbered 0-99 carry institutional credit only and may not be applied to 
a degree program. Courses numbered 100-199 are generally planned for the freshman 
year; courses numbered 200-299 for the sophomore year; courses numbered 300-399 
for the junior year and courses numbered 400-599 for the senior year. 

Courses taken to fulfill core curriculum requirements may not be used to meet 
other requirements of a degree program. 

Lettering System for Course 

In the course listings given in the Armstrong Core Curriculum requirements and in the 
departmental curricula which follow, there appear two or three letters preceding a three 
digit number. Following is an exhaustive list of all abbreviations used for course 
designation purposes. 



ACC 


= Accounting (SSC) 


GEL 


= Geology 


ANT 


= Anthropology 


GEO 


= Geography 


ART 


= Art 


GER 


= German 


AST 


= Astronomy 










HE 


= Health Education 


BE 


= Business Education (SSC) 


HS 


= Health Science 


BAD 


= Business Administration (SSC) 


HIS 


= History 


BIO 


= Biology 






BOT 


= Botany 


JRN 


= Journalism 


BSN 


= Baccalaureate Nursing 










LM 


= Library Media 


Q 


= Criminal Justice 


LS 


= Library Science 


cs 


= Computer Science 


LAT 


= Latin 


CHE 


= Chemistry 


LIN 


= Linguistics 


DH 


= Dental Hygiene 


MT 


= Medical Technology 


DRS 


= Drama and Speech 


MAT 


= Mathematics 


DSE 


= Development Studies English 


MET 


= Meteorology 


DSM 


= Dev. Studies Math 


MIL 


= Military Science 


DSR 


= Dev. Studies Reading 


MSN 


= Nursing (Master's) 






MUS 


= Music 


ECO 


= Economics 






EDN 


= Education 


NSC 


= Naval Science 


EGR 


= Engineering 


NUR 


= Nursing (Associate) 


ENG 


= English 






ENT 


= Entomology 


OAD 


= Office Administration (SSC) 


EXC 


= Exceptional Children 


OCE 


= Oceanography 


FLM 


= Film 


PA 


= Public Administration 


FRE 


= French 


PBH 


= Public History 






ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



n 




Ph) si< al Edu< ation 






Kl 


Respirator) I hi • 


PI \i 


= 


Ph) sk .il Edu< ition 


M 


i|oi 


RAD 


K. nil. »l. -v,i. 1 .-. hnologu-s 


PHI 




Philotoph) 










PHS 




Physical s ^ lencc 






s<H 




V\\\ 


= 


Phvsks 






SPA 


Spanish 


POS 


= 


Political s v lencc 










ps\ 


= 


Psy< hol< 






zcx> 


Zooloj 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

rhe degree programs oi Armstrong State ( ollege are presented In this catalog b) 
school by department and by division rhe College is organized into two schools i 
administered by a dean, and two divisions! each administered by .1 division head. and 
two non v hool affiliated departments. The degrees offered by eai h school and division 
axe listed below: 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Degree Department 

Associate of Arts Interdepartmental 

Associate of Applied Science 
Criminal Justice Go ve r nm ent 

Bachelor of Arts 

Art Art and Musk 

Drama/Speech Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

English Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

History History 

Music Art and Musk 

Political Science Government 

Psychology Psychology 

Bachelor of General Studies Interdepartmental 

Bachelor of Music Education Art and Musk 

Bachelor of Science 

Biology Biology 

Chemistry Chemistry and Ph) 

Computer Science Mathematics and Computer Science 

Criminal Justice Government 

Mathematical Sciences Mathematics and Computer Science 

Physical Science Chemistrv and Ph) 

♦Master of Arts 
History History 

♦Master of Science 
Criminal Justice Government 



70 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

School of Health Professions 

Degree Department 

Associate of Science 

Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene 

Nursing Associate Degree Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy Respiratory Therapy 

Bachelor of Health Science Health Science 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Dental Hygiene 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Medical Technology 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursing 

-i-Master of Health Science Health Science 

+Master of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursing 

♦Graduate programs are offered by Georgia Southern University in affiliation with 
Armstrong State College 









Division of Physical Education and Athletics 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

Physical Education Physical Education and Athletics 

Division of Education 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

Early Elementary Education Education 

Middle School Education Education 

Secondary School Education Education 

*Business Education Education 

Social Science Education (History) Education 

Social Science Education (Political Science) Education 

All Levels (K-12) Degree Programs 

Art Education Education 

Speech Correction Education 

Other Degree Programs 
The Division of Education works cooperatively with the Division of Physical Educa- 
tion and Athletics in providing the Bachelor of Science in Education in Physical 
Education as an all levels (K-12) program. Also, working with departments in the 
School of Arts and Sciences, the Division helps provide B.A. or B.S. degrees with 
teacher certification in the secondary fields of Biology, Chemistry, English, History, 
Mathematical Sciences, and Political Science (see the departmental sections in the 
Arts and Sciences listings for degree particulars). 
+ Master of Education 

Early Elementary Education Education 

Middle School Education Education 

Secondary Education Education 

*Business Education Education 

English Education 

Mathematics Education 

Science Education Education 

Social Studies Education 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 71 

Spe< ial Edu< ation 
Behavioi 1 Hsorders ; 

I earning I Hsabilitiea I 

Spec* h I anguage Patholog) 

•Offered In conjuiu Hon with Savannah State c oil. 

• Graduate programs are offered in Georgia Southern i niversih in affiliation with 

Armstrong State t ollege 



72 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 








I 






>• 




l» 



'•:• >. 



' ■ f • 



*t • « • 






#•«•«. 



74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

The College of Graduate Studies 

Responding to increasing needs for graduate-level services in South Georgia, the 
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approved the establishment of 
Georgia Southern University, effective July 1, 1990. In addition to the conversion of 
Georgia Southern College to "university" status, the change brings together the gradu- 
ate-level instructional and research activities in South Georgia by "affiliating" the 
graduate functions of both Armstrong State College and Savannah State College with 
Georgia Southern University. Armstrong State College and Savannah State College 
maintain autonomy as undergraduate colleges but participate in graduate activities 
under the auspices of the College of Graduate Studies at Georgia Southern University. 
While all undergraduate degrees continue to be awarded by the three participating 
institutions, all graduates degrees are now awarded by Georgia Southern University. 

Purpose and Organization 

Graduate programs are designed to provide students with the opportunity and 
resources to enhance their educational, professional, and cultural backgrounds while 
improving their professional skills and competence. Graduate programs encourage 
scholarly inquiry through the appropriate application of valid research methods. 

All graduate programs are administered and coordinated by the Vice-President and 
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research who serves as Chairman of the Graduate 
Council. The Graduate Council is an inter-institutional advisory body composed of 
representatives from Georgia Southern University, Armstrong State College, and Savan- 
nah State College. The Council provides policy direction to the Vice President on all 
matters related to graduate programs. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Georgia Southern University continues to offer the following graduate degree pro- 
grams: 

Master of Arts 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Education 

Master of Fine Arts 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Recreation Administration 

Master of Science 

Master of Science for Teachers 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Master of Technology 

Education Specialist Degree 

Georgia Southern University offers the following graduate degree programs in 
Savannah in affiliation with either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College 
(Additional graduate courses are taught in Savannah in support of other programs of 
study): 

Armstrong State College 

Master of Arts - History 

Master of Education 

Master of Health Science 

Master of Science - Criminal Justice 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Savannah State College 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Social Work (currently under development) 



GRADUATE STUDIES 



f% 



Programs of Study 

Adult tnd Vocational Education 

Art 

Biolog) 

Business 

Business Education 

Counselor I du< ation 

Criminal fustice 

Early Childhood Education 

Educational Administration 

English 

English Education 

Exercise Science 

French 

German 

Health and Physical Education 

Health Science 

History 

Public History* 

Home Economics 

Instructional Media 

Library Media 

Mathematics 

Mathematics Education 

Middle Grades Education 

Music 

Nursing 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Reading Specialist 

Recreation Administration 

School Administration and Supervision 

School Psychology 

School Psychometry 

Science 

Secondary Subject Matter Supervision 

Social Science 

Social Work (currently under development) 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Education for Exceptional Children 

Behavior Disorders* 

Interrelated 

Learning Disabilities* 

Mental Retardation 

Speech /Language Pathology* 
Sport Management 
Technology 
Technology Education 



Degree 

\i I J 

\i i \ \1 Ed Ms l 

\l S 

\1 B A 

\i Ed ' M S I 

M.Ed Kls 

Ms* 

M Ed * Kls 

Ed D 

M.A./M Ed msi Bd£ 

\1 1 -d.VM.SJ. 

M.S. 

M.Ed. 

M.Ed. 

M.Ed./M.S.T./Ed.S. 

M.H.S.* 

M.S.* 

M.Ed./M.S.T. 

M.Ed. 

Ed.S. 

M.S. 

M.Ed./M.S.T./Ed.S. 

M.Ed.VEd.S. 

M.Ed./M.S.T./Ed.S. 

M.S.N* 

M.A. 

M.A. 

M.P.A.+ 

M.Ed./Ed.S. 

M.R.A. 

M.Ed./Ed.S. 

Ed.S. 

M.Ed. 

M.Ed.*/M.S.T./Ed.S. 

M.Ed. 

M.Ed.VM.S.T./Ed.S. 

M.S.W.+ 

M.A. 

M.Ed. 

M.Ed.VEd.S. 



M.S. 
M.T. 
M.Ed./M.S.T./Ed.S. 



indicates programs offered in affiliation with Armstrong State College 
♦Indicates programs offered in affiliation with Savannah State College 



76 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduates of colleges or universities accredited by the proper regional accrediting 
association may apply for admission to the College of Graduate Studies. Admission is 
restricted to include only those students whose academic records indicate that they can 
successfully undertake graduate work. Only students formally admitted to the Graduate 
School are eligible to enroll in graduate courses (courses numbered 600, 700, 800, and 
900). 

All applications must be mailed to: 

The College of Graduate Studies 
Georgia Southern University 
Statesboro, Georgia 30480-8113 

Application Procedures 

All degree-seeking applicants for admission to the College of Graduate Studies must: 

1. Submit a completed application furnished by the College of Graduate Studies. 

2. Submit two (2) official transcripts of all previous academic work. 

3. Submit official test scores as required for the program selected. (To be official, test 
scores must be sent to the College of Graduate Studies directly from the testing agency 
or be recorded on an official transcript.) 

All applicants who do not wish to work toward a degree must: 

1 . Submit a completed application and other required forms. 

2. Submit two (2) official transcripts of all previous academic work. 

3. Test scores are not required for Non-Degree applicants. 

Transcripts must be officially embossed copies sent directly from the Institution to the 
College of Graduate Studies at Georgia Southern University. 

The completed application and all credentials should be received by the College of 
Graduate Studies by the deadline dates listed in the Georgia Southern University 
Graduate Catalog. Materials submitted in support of an application become the property 
of Georgia Southern University and cannot be forwarded or returned. 

Each completed application with supporting materials is referred to the school or 
division in which the applicant proposes to study. The graduate faculty in that depart- 
ment or division consider the application. The final decision on each application is made 
by the Vice-President for Graduate Studies and Research. 

Assistantships 

A number of qualified graduate students may be given financial aid in the form of 
assistantships or teaching fellowships while pursuing work leading to a graduate degree. 
The criteria and procedure for appointment as a graduate assistant may be obtained in 
the Office of the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research at Georgia Southern 
University or the Office of the Associate Graduate Dean at Armstrong State College. 

Georgia Southern University Graduate Catalog 

Please refer to the Georgia Southern University Graduate Catalog for additional 
information related to admission procedures and requirements. The Graduate Catalog 
also contains information on graduate programs, graduate courses, the graduate faculty, 
financial aid opportunities, and academic standards and regulations. 



I 



GRADUATE STUDIES 77 



Copies of the Graduate Catalog and application information are available In 
the following offices: 

The College oi t Graduate Studkfl 
i indrumBox 81 1 1 
[ leorgia Southern University 
Statetboro Georgia 10460 B113 
(912)681 3384 
GRAD-GSU 

Office ol the Associate ( Sraduate Dean 
Armstrong State College 
Savannah, Georgia 31419 
(912)927 5377 

Office oJ the Associate Graduate Dean 
Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 31404 
(912)351-3801 

Off-Campus Graduate Centers 

Resident graduate credit is offered on off-campus centers at Brunswick and Fort 
Gordon (Augusta). Students in Brunswick may pursue Master of Education (M.Ed.) 
programs in: Early Childhood Education, School Administration and Supervision, 
Special Education for Exceptional Children, and Middle Grades Education or Public 
Administration (M.P.A.), while Fort Gordon students may pursue programs in either 
Adult Education (M.Ed.) or Public Administration (M.P.A.). 

Off-campus admission and degree requirements are identical to those of the on- 
campus programs. Information can be obtained at the off-campus sites as well as on the 
on-campus sites listed above. 

GSU Graduate Office 
Continuing Education Office 
Brunswick College 
Brunswick, Georgia 31523 
(912) 264-7260 

Education Division 
GSU Graduate Office #38804 
Ft. Gordon, Georgia 30905 
(404) 790-9338 

Immunization Requirements 

In order to comply with University System of Georgia policies, all new students 
attending Georgia Southern University will be required to submit a Certificate of 
Immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella prior to registering for classes. Students 
who were previously enrolled at Georgia Southern University, Armstrong State College, 
Savannah State College, or Brunswick College will be exempt from this regulation, if any 
of the listed schools was the most recent or last school attended. 

Students who do not present evidence of immunization as set forth above will not be 
allowed to register or to attend classes until such time as they can present the required 
immunization certificate. Students who have religious objections and students whose 



78 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



physicians have certified that they cannot 
be immunized because of medical reasons 
may be allowed to register with the under- 
standing that they must leave the campus 
in the event of an outbreak of the aforemen- 
tioned diseases. 

The certification must be on a form pro- 
vided by Georgia Southern and signed by 
a physician or an official of a County Health 
Department. This certification form is 
mailed to all new students admitted to 
Georgia Southern. If you have questions 
call the Health Services Center at (912) 681- 
5641. 









s 




80 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Adams, Joseph V., Dean 

Philosophy and Goals 

Through its academic programs, professional staff, scholarly resources, and physi- 
cal facilities, the School of Arts and Sciences opens to qualified students opportunity 
for the best possible education attainable within the confines of its programming and 
resources. 

The School's core curriculum provides for all students, regardless of major, an 
introduction to the arts, sciences, social sciences, and mathematics. More information 
on this core curriculum can be found on page 56. 

In addition, the School of Arts and Sciences enables students to pursue specialized 
study in particular disciplines. Such study intends to broaden and deepen a student's 
knowledge of the field, familiarize a student with its methodologies, provide a 
foundation for graduate study, and prepare students for a variety of careers. 

To complement classroom instruction, students in the arts and sciences programs 
can take advantage of a host of opportunities to enhance their understanding of chosen 
disciplines. These opportunities include participating, in one form or another, in such 
activities as extra curricular and curricular related lectures, field trips, performances, 
recitals, and exhibits. Additional opportunities include participating in professional 
organizations and honorary societies. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Arts and Sciences includes the departments of art and music; biology; 
chemistry and physics; government; history; languages, literature, and dramatic arts; 
mathematics and computer science; and psychology. 
Undergraduate degree programs: 
Associate in Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice 
Bachelor of Arts with majors in: 
Art 

Drama/Speech 
English 
History 
Music 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Bachelor of General Studies 
Bachelor of Music Education 
Bachelor of Science with majors in: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 

Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics) 
Mathematical Sciences (Applied Mathematics) 
Mathematical Sciences (Computer Science) 
Physical Science 

Further particulars on the undergraduate liberal arts programs are found in the arts 
and sciences departmental sections. 

Several liberal arts degrees are offered in cooperation with the Division of Educa- 
tion and provide teacher certification. These are listed below. A more comprehensive 
list of certification programs is listed in the Division of Education section of this catalog. 



,■ 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 81 



Ba< heloi ol Vrts(with tea< hei certification) k ith majors In 

I nglish 

i Ustar) 

Political s «. ience 
Bm heloj ol S< lence (with tea< hei certification) with 011)011 In 

Imp.. 

c hemistr) 

Mathematical S< fences 
All teacher education programs are approved by the Georgia State ProfeasionaJ 
Standards t bmmission and are a< credited by the National C ouiu U tor Aj * reditation <>t 
reacher Education. 

Minor Concentrations of Study 

rhe following minors are ottered by departments within the School <>t Arts and 
Sciences Students may include one or more of these in their programs oJ stud 
circumstances may permit. 

Anthropology Legal Studies 

Art Linguistics 

Biology Mathematics 

Botany Mental Health 

Chemistry Music 

Communications Organizational Psychology 

Computer Science Philosophy 

Criminal Justice Physical Sciences 

Drama /Speech Physics 

Economics Political Science 

Engineering Science Psychology 

English Public Administration 

Film Public History 

Foreign Language Russian Studies 

History Sociology 

Human Biology Zoology 

International Studies 

General Studies 

Director: Dr. Grace Martin 

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Coordinator: Dr. Donald Anderson 

Associate and baccalaureate degree programs in General Studies, emphasizing a 
liberal arts education, are operated under the general supervision of the Dean of the 
School of Arts and Sciences and under the immediate direction of the head oi the 
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Curriculum guidance for these programs 
is provided by the General Studies Degree Program Committee. Interested students 
should contact the General Studies Coordinator. 

The Bachelor of General Studies degree is also available at the Brunswick Center 
on the Brunswick College campus in Brunswick, Ga. Interested persons should contact 
the coordinator of the Brunswick Center or the General Studies Coordinator on the 
Armstrong campus. 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, a student must complete at least 30 hours 
of the required course work and 45 quarter hours of all coursework in this program at 
Armstrong State College. The program is designed to provide a substantial liberal 
education as a base for upper division specialization. 

Certain courses may be exempted by examination. 



82 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 63 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; 
ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191 or 115 or 192; HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. POS 113 and one course selected from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

Area V 3 

1. PE 103 or 108 1 

2. Two activity courses 2 

B. Courses in the Concentration and/or Electives 30 

These courses may be specified by a department or may be electives. 
Students planning work toward a baccalaureate degree should select 
courses that meet listed requirements of that degree program. 

C Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 93 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

At least four quarters prior to anticipated graduation, students must submit a degree 
proposal to the General Studies Coordinator for approval. 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; 
ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Two courses selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201; two courses in any foreign language through the 200 level 10 

3. One or two courses selected from: ANT 201; CS 115, 120, 142; 

ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5-10 

4. One or two courses selected from: BIO 101, 102; BOT 203; CHE 121, 122; 
CHE 128, 129; CHE 201, 202; CHE 211; PHY 211, 212, 213; PHY 217, 218, 
219; PHS 121, 122; ZOO 204, 208, 209 5-10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

NOTE: Certain preceding courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. 
Also, if a physical science sequence is used to satisfy Area II, then a biological science must 
be chosen in Area IV. The converse is also true. 



ART AND MUSIC 



Othet Requirements 

1 a minimuon oi 15 hours at the 300 level 

\ maximum oi 40 hours In an) one discipline excluding com 

undei ie< ton \ 
I No more than two D*a ire allowed in the General Studies section 
\ \ Lfteen oi the W ( leneraJ Studies hours must be completed .it Armstrong 

General Studies 

Co ur s es si me 200 or above level 

l. Humanities M0 

American civilization! art. comparative Literature, 

English or American literature, history, music, philosophy. 
: nhi.i1 Sciences 

Anthropology, criminal justice, economics, geography, 

political science, psychology, public history, km iology 
) Mathematics and Natural Sciences M0 

Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, entomology, 

geology, mathematics, meteorology, oceanography, 

physics, zoology. 

4. Communication Arts MO 

Computer science, drama /speech, 

film, foreign languages, journalism, linguistics. 

Area of Concentration (Any University System approved minor) 20-29 

Electives 36-45 

5. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191 



Art and Music 

Faculty 

* Anderson, James, Department Head 

Bowles, Kenneth Keith, William 

Green, Rachel Schmidt, John 

Harris, Robert * Schultz, Lucinda 

Jensen, John Vogelsang, Kevin 

* Jensen, Linda 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Department of Art and Music offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in art 
and music, the Bachelor of Music Education degree, and in cooperation with the 
Department of Secondary Education, the Bachelor of Science in Art Education. 

Placement Examinations 

Transfer and new students in music must take placement examinations as appro- 
priate in applied music, music theory, and music history. Acceptance of transfer credit 
towards graduation requirements in each area is contingent upon the results of the 
examination. 

Transfer students in art will be required to take a placement examination in art 
history. Additionally, coursework at other institutions in studio art may not be 
counted towards graduation until a portfolio of artwork is submitted demonstrating 
competency in those areas in which classes have been completed. 

Additional Requirements for Music Majors 

There are a variety of departmental policies and regulations which affect music 
majors. Included are requirements for recital attendance, ensemble participation, piano 



84 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



proficiency, recital participation, applied music levels, and the Rising Junior Applied 
Music Examination. A copy of A Handbook of Policies and Regulations for Music Majors will 
be given to each music student. 

Please see the "Fees" section of this catalog for information on applied music fees. 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) have a distinctly useful place in the Arts and 
Music curriculum. The intent of the DIS is for an enrichment experience that 
otherwise is unavailable in the classroom. Normally, regular curriculum coursework 
should not be completed by individual study. 

However, if a regular course is to be taught by individual study, the following 
criteria must be met before approval may be granted by the department head: 1) the 
course must not have been offered during the preceding three quarters nor be 
scheduled during the succeeding three quarters; 2) the student must gain the approval 
of the anticipated instructor; 3) transient students must gain the permission of not only 
the department head, but the dean of faculty, and of the college from which the student 
comes; and 4) the student must demonstrate, in writing, that a hardship will exist if 
permission is denied, for the student to take an individual study. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ART 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

PHI 201; MUS 200 5* 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Lab Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. ART 111, 112, 201, 202, 213 25 

2. MUS 200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. ART 204, 313, 330, 340, 370, 413, 470 35 

2. One from: ART 271, 272, 273 5* 

C Special Course Requirements 20 

1. Foreign language sequence through 103 15 

2. PHI 400 5 

D. Electives 35 

Recommend ART 271, 272, 273* 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 
*(May not be duplicated with major field, Area I, and elective requirements.) 



ART AND MUSIC 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

Hours 

\ General Requirements 101 

Area I 

1 HNCi 101,102 or 192,201 c*292 15 

: One course from: AR1 200,271,2 NG222; 

MUS 200; rill 201 5 

Area II 

MAT 101, 290 li' 

1 ib Science Sequence 10 

Arm 111 20 

HIS 1 14 or 191, US or 192; POS 113 1 5 

One COUZM from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

MUS 111, 112,113,211,212,213 18 

MUS 140 6 

MUS 256 or 254 6 

Area V 6 

PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 33 

1. MUS 240, 281, 340, 371, 372, 373 24 

2. Two Courses from MUS 312, 361, 412 6 

3. One Course from MUS 416, 425, 427 3 

C Track Options 38 

1. General Track: Electives 38 

One of the following performance/composition tracks. 

Prerequisite: Departmental Permission Only. 

2. Keyboard Performance 

MUS 258, 440, 420, 421 14 

Electives 24 

3. Vocal Performance 

MUS 313, 314, 315, 429, 440 15 

Electives 26 

4. Wind Instrument Performance 

MUS 440, 481 9 

One course from MUS 312, 361, 412 3* 

One course from MUS 432 or 433 3 

Electives 23 

5. Composition 

MUS 422 12 

One course from MUS 312, 361, 412 3* 

Electives 23 

D. Special Course Requirements 25 

1. ART 271, 272, 273 (may not be duplicated with Area I requirement) 10 

2. Foreign language sequence through 103 15 

3. RECITAL PERFORMANCES (determined by option 3 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 197 
*(May not be duplicated with Major Field Requirements) 



86 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,290 10 

2. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 70-73 

1. MUS 211, 212, 213, 236, 237, 238, 239, 281 20 

2. MUS 240, 340 12 

3. MUS 312, 330, 331, 361, 412 17 

4. MUS 371, 372, 373 9 

5. One of the following emphases: 

A. Choral Emphasis 

MUS 353, 313, 423, 480, and 314 or 315 12 

B. Instrumental Emphasis 

MUS 227, 352, 416, 424, 481 12 

C. Keyboard Emphasis 

MUS 227, 425, 420 or 421, 423 or 424, 352 or 353, 480 or 481 15 

C Professional Sequence 25 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

D. Special Course Requirements 

One half of senior recital 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196-199 

Minor Concentration 

Minor concentrations in art and in music are available through the Department of 
Art and Music. The requirements of each are: 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 63 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; 

ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 



ART AND MUSIC 



\rr.i III 

l Mis [14 or 191 oi l15oi 192 HIS 10 

POS 113 and one course selected froon \\i 201; 

i ( O201 202 PSi 101 < I i" 

trea \ 

l PI I03or 106 l 

\wo activity courses 

B Courses in the Concentration 

\:: 

1. ART 111. 112 10 

One course selected from: ART 271, 272, 273 

rwo courses selected from: ART 201, 202, 204, 211, 213, 

M4, BO, 131. WO 164, 570,413 

Music 29 

1. MUS 1 1 1,1 12,1 13 9 

2. Applied Music (SIX hours in one area) 6 

J Music Ensemble 251 or 2^4 6 

4. Music Historv and Literature K 

5 MUS 000 (recital attendance) 

Associate In Arts with Concentrations 

Hours 
Concentration in Art 25 

1. ART 111, 112 10 

2. One course selected from: ART 271, 272, 273 5 

3. Two courses selected from: ART 201, 202, 204, 211, 213, 

314, 316, 330, 331, 340, 362, 363, 364, 370, 413 10 

Concentration in Music 29 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113 9 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 256, 254 6 

4. Music History and Literature 8 

5. Piano Proficiency 

6. MUS 000 (Recital Attendance) 

Art Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to non-art majors. 

ART 111 Basic Design I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to two-dimensional design and graphic communication. 

ART 112 Basic Design II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in Art 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

The fundamentals of three-dimensional design introduced through sculptural projects 

in various media. 

ART 200 Introduction to the Visual Arts (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand . 

A study of artistic theories, styles, media and techniques and their application in 

masterworks of art from all ages. Not recommended for art majors. 

ART 201 Painting I (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 1 1 1 or ART 213 or permission of the 
instructor. 

A basic course in acrylic or oil painting from observed and secondary sources. 
ART 202 Painting II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 201 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of Painting I with an increasing emphasis on student selected painting 
problems. 



88 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ART 204 Introduction to Photography (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction to black and white photographic aesthetics and processes. Including 
study of the mechanical-optical functions of cameras and enlargers as well as printing 
and processing of film in a controlled environment. 

ART 211 Graphic Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of the instructor. 

The fundamentals of visual communication including design, layout, typography and 

reproduction as related to modern advertising techniques. 

ART 213 Drawing I (4-2-5) 

A fundamental course emphasizing representational drawing from still-life, land- 
scape, and figural form. 

ART 271 History of Art (5-0-5) 

A survey of the visual arts, painting, sculpture, and architecture, in Western 
Civilization from prehistory to the Late Middle Ages. 

ART 272 History of Art II (5-0-5) 

Italian Renaissance through Rococo art. 

ART 273 History of Art III (5-0-5) 

Modern Art, the late eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. 

ART 313 Drawing II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 213 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of Drawing I with emphasis on figuration, composition, and color. 

ART 314 Intermediate Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 204 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of the study of the aesthetics and processes in black and white 

photography. 

ART 315 Color Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 204, or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction of the principles, aesthetics, and print processes of color photography. 

ART 316 Hand Colored and Manipulated Silver Print (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 204, or permission of the instructor. 
Exploration of a variety of media and techniques to enhance and alter a silver print. 

ART 320 Art for the Elementary Teacher (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study, with studio experience, of materials and methods for teaching art at the 

elementary school level. 

ART 330 Ceramics I (4-2-5) 

Introduction to fundamentals of wheel thrown pottery, handbuilding techniques and 
ceramic sculpture. Emphasis is on decoration, form, craftsmanship and creativity. 
Traditional glazing and firing techniques as well as an exploration into non- 
traditional methods of coloring and construction. 

ART 331 Pottery Techniques (4-2-5) 

Emphasis in on techniques of pottery utilizing the potter's wheel. 

ART 333 Ceramic Sculpture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission of instructor. 

Emphasis is on developing ideas into large scale ceramic sculpture. Individual 
attention and direction is facilitated. Projects may include pottery, the figure, 
abstractions, wall relief and mixed media construction. 

ART 340 Printmaking I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to basic printmaking ideas and terminology. Projects will include one 
or more of the following: linoleum, woodblock, intaglio, silkscreen and non-tradi- 
tional methods of making prints. 

ART 350 Art In the Lower School (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques and materials for teaching art in the 

elementary school. 






ART AND MUSIC 



\tt In Hit Middle Uld I ppCI School (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite Permission of the inslructoi ^rt education majors only 

I he analysis and evaluation oi techniques and materials foi teaching art in|unioi 
>uul aenioi high w hool 

1 nameling [ewelrj Making (4-2-5) 

( offered on demand 

Introduction of process in the production of a variety of enameled art works, and of 

proceaaea in the making oi jewelry! both li.unim.HK- and ( .ist 

Batik rextile Design (4-2-5) 

(. Offered on demand 

I Kploration oi •> variety oi processea used in applying original desigm to Eabri 

1 ibera c onatruction (4-2-5) 

<. Offered on demand 

1 development oi processes used in on and off techniques in weavingand moontempo 

rai \ fiber \n. <i 1 1 hangings. 

I igure Sculpture I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to bask sculpture ideas, terminology, and proceaaea Emphasis will 

be placed on working with the human figure utilizing clay and other media 

Sculpture Materials (4-2-5) 

I his course is an introduction to additive and aubtractive sculpture techniques 
Emphasis will be placed on a variety ofs< ulptural imagery and media indudingwood 
construction, carving, and mixed media. 

Seminar In Art Education (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only 

A BUrvey of current trends in instructional and research techniques. 

Drawing III (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 313 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of Drawing II with increasingly complex problems in concept, design, 

and technique 

Museum Studies (4-2-5) 
Spring, 1994. 

A aim ey oi the development of museums in the United States and oi the ethics and 

practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, planning. 
outreach, and public education. 

Senior Portfolio (1-6-5) 

Each student will develop a body of work in the medium of choice that demonstrates 

a consistent theme or approach. This course is taken in preparation tor the Senior 
Portfolio Review and Exhibition. 

Selected Studies In Art (V-VU-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission oi the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet special institutional and community needs 

May be repeated for credit. 

Directed Individual Study (V-V-U-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. 

Internship (V-V-U-4-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission ot instructor and department 

head and an overall grade point average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving ott-campus 

study, work, and /or research. Projects usually encompass the entireacademic quarter 

and are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring institution and his/her facultv 

supervisor. 



90 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Applied Music Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to non-music majors. 

MUS 130 Applied Music (one credit) 

Prerequisite: Sufficient music background, determined by audition of MUS 1 1 0. 
One twenty-five minute lesson per week in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, 
voice, or woodwinds. Applicable to a music degree only for a secondary applied 
credit. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 140 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to music majors and a limited number of non-majors by audition only. 
Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 240 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 140 level as determined by jury examination. 
Music majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 340 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Rising Junior Applied Music Examination. 
Music majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 440 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 340 level as determined by jury examination. 
Music majors only 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

Music Offerings 






MUS 000 Recital Attendance (0-V-0) 

A requirement for music majors and minors which consists of attendance at a designated 
number of concerts / recitals each quarter. 

MUS 110 Basic Music Theory (3-0-3) 

An introduction to music theory for students needing skills for MUS 1 1 1 . May not be 
used for credit toward a degree in music. 

MUS 111 Elementary Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 110 or equivalent by examination. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music including sightsinging, ear- 
training and keyboard harmony. 

MUS 112 Elementary Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 111 with emphasis on part-writing and diatonic material. 

MUS 113 Elementary Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 1 1 2 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 112 introducing seventh chords and diatonic modulation. 

MUS 114 Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand . Prerequisite: MUS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on basic jazz literature, chord symbol, melodic patterns, ear training, 

melodic concepts and analysis of improvised solos. 

MUS 200 Introduction to Music Literature (5-05) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand music by means of analysis of style, 

forms, and media of musical expression. 



ART AND MUSIC 



\n s 201 i ikhifitamilng fan I MW) 

i Hfered on denruind 

\ m «ii technical turve) "t jasi peHbrmen and ^u i«-s with rm pi i 
literature 1 he< oursewulexamiiwelementsof jazz such as impi 
tatkmand i in thm and trace then development from New Ori 

fusion nuisu 

MUS202 sunov ot Rock Musk (3-04) 

i. Kfered on demand 

\ non technical nirve) ot rock musk and its itylet \Nith wnphatit m 

literature 
MUS203 Popular Music In 20th Century America (3-0-3) 

c mered on demand 

Asurvej ofpopularmusk Erom ragtime to preaenl Examinationolpopularmuek and 

its relationship to Aiiutrmii culture. 
MUS211 Intermediate Theory I (3-2-3) 

Rail Prerequisite: A grade ot v or higher in MUS 1 13 or permission oi instructor 
\ continuation oi MUS 1 13 with emphasis on chromatic harmony 

MUS 212 Intermediate Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter Prerequisite A grade of "C" or higher in MLS 21 1 or permission of instructor 
\ l ontmuation ot MUS 21 1 . 

Intermediate Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 21 2 or permission of instructor 
A continuation of MUS 212 with emphasis on twentieth century techniques. 

Jazz Improvisation II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 1 14 or permission of the instructor 

Emphasis on the analysis and performance of intermediate |an literature and 

composition in contemporary styles. 

MUS 224 Class Guitar (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Designed for the development of basic skills in playing the guitar tor accompanying 

Focuses on chorded styles and their application to music such as folksongs and popular 

music. 

MUS 226 Class Piano I, II, III (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Students enrolling in 
II or III must have received a grade of "C" or higher in the preceding class 
A study of keyboard techniques with emphasis on the skills needed to fulfill the 
piano proficiency requirement. 

MUS 227 Class Voice (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music major status or permission ot the instructor 
A study of voice production techniques with practical application to standard song 
literature. Not open to students whose principal instrument is voice 

MUS 228 Class Piano for Non-Music Majors (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 
An applied study of keyboard literature and techniques at the beginni: . 
elementary levels. An elective course, open only to non-music majors which meets 
in the electronic piano laboratory. May be repeated for credit 
MUS 236 Bras Methods (0-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of brass instrument performance and pedag 

MUS 237 Woodwind Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only . 

An in troduction to the principles of wood wind instrument performance and pod 

MUS 238 Percussion Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of percussion instrument performance and ped I 



92 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 239 String Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of string instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 250 Pep Band (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter. Open to qualified students. 

A group to provide spirit music at school athletic functions. May be taken for academic 

credit, at most, four times. 

MUS 251 Concert Band (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard literature for symphonic band. Public 

performances are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 252 Jazz Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from a variety of jazz styles and periods. Public performances 

are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 253 Armstrong Singers (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all students by audition. Jazz Choir. Public performances are a 
part of the course requirement. 

MUS 254 Concert Choir (0-3-1) 

Membership open to all students. Ability to read music desired but not required. 
Repertoire to be selected each quarter from the standard choral concert literature. 
There will be public performances each quarter. 

MUS 255 Chamber Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Open to all qualified students in the performance media of brass, woodwind, string, 

keyboard, voice, and percussion instruments. 

MUS 256 wind Ensemble (0-3-1) 

Offered on demand . Permission of instructor only 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard wind ensemble literature. Public 

performances are part of the course requirement. 

MUS 257 Opera Workshop (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Preparation and performance of work or excerpts of works from 
the operatic repertoire. 

MUS 258 Keyboard Accompanying (1 -2-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

A study of the basic principles of accompaniment. 

MUS 259 Oratorio Chorus (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all. 

Evening rehearsals. Literature to be selected from the larger choral works. Ability 

to read music not required. Public performances are part of the course requirement. 

MUS 281 Conducting (3-0-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 113. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the techniques of conducting and interpretation. 

MUS 312 Form and Analysis (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. 

The study of the principles of form in music and techniques of harmonic analysis. 

MUS 313 English and Italian Lyric Diction and Repertoire (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Music Majors Only 

A study of the International Phonetic Alphabet, the phonetics of English and Italian 

for singing and a survey of representative English and Italian vocal repertoire. 

MUS 314 German Lyric Diction and Repertoire (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 21 7, music majors only 

Orientation to the phonetics of German for singing by means of the International 

Phonetic Alphabet and a survey of representative German vocal repertoire. 



ART AND MUSIC 



93 



MUS 373 



MUS 420 



l rench i prU Diction end Repertoire n -'> 

P rerequisite Ml S21 ' musk majorsonl) 

Orientation to the phonetics oi I rench foi singing b) mean "i the Inti ■ 

Phonetk Alphabet and •> iiurve) oi re p r es e n tative i rem i> vocal r. , 

Music tor the Elementary rtachcf t^-o-s) 

P rere q uisite \dmiasionto reachei I ducation 

\ stud) of the materials and methodi tor teat King general muak ta * ti»- 1 

daaaroon Notfbrmusk majors 

Music In the Lower School (4-0-4) 

Muak majorsonl) 

K course for musk majors emphasizing analysis end evaluation of techniques and 

materials for teaching musk in the lower school 

Music In the Middle and Upper School (4-0-4) 

Music majors only. 

•\ course tor musk majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation oi tax hniques and 

materials tor teaching music in the middle and senior hi^h si hools 

Band Methods (2-0-2) 

O ff ered on demand. Prere q uisite: Music majorsonlv 

A course dealing with the organization, maintenance and development oi school 

bnstrurnental ensembles. 

Choral Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 227. Music majorsonlv 

A course dealing with the organization and development or school choral OTganiZfl 

tions, problems of choral singing, and fundamentals of choral conducting 

Orchestration and Arranging (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 21 3. Music majorsonlv 

An introduction to the techniques of arranging and scoring for vocal and instrumental 

ensembles. 

Music History I (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission oi the 

instructor. Music majors only. 

The history of music in Western Civilization from its origins through the Renaiss 

Music History II (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission of the 

instructor. Music majors only. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Baroque and ClSBSk Periods 

Music History III (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS213or permission of the instructor Musk maK>rv 

only. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Romantic Period and in the 20th 

century. 

Composition (V-V 2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 21 3. Music majors on I \ Maybe tepea I • 

credit. 

Counterpoint (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS213. Music majors only. 
A study of contrapuntal practices of 18th century music. 

Topics In Instrumental Repertoire and 

Pedagogical Techniques (3-0-3). 

Offered on demand. Junior status or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for 

credit as topics vary. 

A survey of instrumental literature and teaching techniques for brass, guitar, 

percussion, or woodwind instruments. 

Piano Literature I (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of piano literature 
of the Baroque and Classic periods. 



94 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 421 Piano Literature II (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of piano literature 
of the Romantic and Contemporary periods. 

MUS 422 Opera Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand . Prerequisite: MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of the lyric 

theatre from Baroque to the present. 

MUS 423 Choral Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand . Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of the instructor. Music 

majors only. 

A survey of the literature of choral ensemble. 

MUS 424 Band Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of the instructor. Music 

majors only. 

A survey of the literature of band and wind ensemble. 

MUS 425 Piano Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand . Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

A study of pedagogical techniques of the piano and a survey of literature suited for 

teaching purposes. 

MUS 427 Vocal Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of pedagogical techniques of the voice and a survey of literature suited for 

teaching purposes. 

MUS 428 Marching Band Techniques (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music majors only or permission of the instructor. 
A study of techniques used in show design and instruction of the high school marching 
band. 

MUS 429 Art Song (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of the art song 

from its origins to the present day. 

MUS 432 Symphonic Music Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of symphonic 

music from its origins to the present day. 

MUS 433 Instrumental Chamber Music Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of instrumental 

chamber music from its origins to the present day. 

MUS 480 Advanced Choral Conducting (3-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites:. MUS 281, 312, 361 . Music majors only. 
Advanced techniques for the choral conductor. 

MUS 481 Advanced Instrumental Conducting (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 281 , 312, 261 . Music majors only. 
Advanced techniques for the instrumental conductor. 

MUS 489 Selected Studies In Music (V-V-(l -5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet special institutional and community needs 

May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 490 Directed Individual Study (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. Music majors only. 



BIOLOGY N 



MUS4*M Internship (\ Y-(l-S)) 

Ottered b\ special arrangement l'irt»\]iiisit,- I \r mission i >f inst • 

head and .111 overall grade poinl ivcragc of 

i htttudent urill puraueanindh Iduall) designed courae pro)* linvo 

study work and or research rrojivts usually encompass thfvnttratctdcmice 

Mid arcundVr tht-|omt Miprr\ lMonof t hi- sponsoring institution tlld his hci l,uull\ 

supervisor 

Biology 

Faculty 

Kelvea Kenneth. Department Head 

• Beumer Ronald Larson, Brett 

Brower, Moonyean Smith, Pamela 

Guillou. I aurent Thome, Francis 

kempke. Su/anne Wynn, Gail 

* Graduate Faculty 

The major in biology consists of BIO 101, BIO 102, BOT 203 and ZOO 204, and it least 
40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (BIO, BOT, ZOO) numbered 300 or tl 
The majority of the courses in the major numbered 300 or above must be taken in the 
Biology Department at Armstrong State College. 

Each student acquiring a major in biology must include in his/her program the 
following courses: BIO 360,370, 480; BOT410orZOO410;onecourseinbotanv numbered 
300 or above, other than BOT 410; and one course in zoology numbered 300 or above, 
other than ZOO 410. If credit for any of the first three required units is transferred to 
Armstrong from another college, the department may require that it be validated bv 
examination. 

In addition, biology majors must complete elementary statistics and the course 
sequence in organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The course in general college ph . 
i (15 quarter hours) is strongly recommended and should be considered essential tor 
those who expect to continue the study of biology beyond the B.S. degree 

To be eligible for a B.S. degree in biology the student must have a grade of at least 
"C" for all biology courses. 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong courses in biol 
high school may take examinations for advanced placement or for credit for BIO 101 
and /or 102. Arrangements to take these examinations may be made with the head of 
the department. 

In order to receive Core Curriculum credits for the biology laboratory science 
sequence by taking biology in the Savannah State-Armstrong exchange program* ■ 
student must take the ENTIRE sequence of ten quarter hours either at Armstrong State 
College or at Savannah State College. 

By careful use of electives a student majoring in biology may concurrently acquire 
a second major in chemistry (i.e., he or she may take a "double major"). This program 
is recommended for preprofessional students. It does require 10 to 20 quarter hours 
credit above the minimum required for graduation. Ask the department head tor 
additional information. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 



96 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area II 20 

1. BIO101;102 10 

2. MAT 101 (or 103 or 206 if examination allows) and MAT 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; BOT 203 and ZOO 204 20 

2. Two courses from: natural sciences, Mathematics, foreign language 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement: 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. BIO 360, 370, 480; BOT 410 or ZOO 410 20 

2. Electives at the 300-400 level selected from biology, botany, 
entomology, and zoology. Electives must include, one BOT 

course other than BOT 410 and one ZOO course other than ZOO 410 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

CHE 341, 342, 343 15 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
SPECIAL NOTES: 

(1) Biology majors should take BIO 101 and BIO 102 during the freshman year, and BOT 
203 and ZOO 204 during the sophomore year. CHE 128 and 129 should be completed 
by the end of spring quarter of the sophomore year. 

(2) The biology major should complete organic chemistry (CHE 341, 342, 343) no later 
than the end of the junior year as it is prerequisite or corequisite to all physiology 
courses. 

(3) Students who may wish to enter graduate school are advised that PHY 211, 212, 213, 
and foreign language to third quarter proficiency should be considered essential. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103, or 206 5 

2. MAT 220 5 

3. BIO 101; 102 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; 

POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; ZOO 204; MAT 103 20 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 



BIOLOGY 97 



1 PI 103 <m 108 and 117a 166 

2 i hiee ictrvtt) counts 
Stale Requirement 

HIS 

B c ounce m the Major Field 

l WO Mtf) *70, 480; BOl 203 

801 410 or ZOO 410 

1 Elective* si the 300-400 level l el e c ted from botany and 
c <, ourses in Related Fields 

1. CHE 341, u: 143 

: Mmvot \M m,MET301,GEQ301,OCE301,orPH\ 211, 212. 2M 

D. P ro fessi onal Sequence 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 472, 473 g 

2 PSY 201 or EDN 201 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

IOTAL 216 

MINOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The following minor concentrations are available from the Department oi Biolog) 
For minors, the student must earn a grade of "C" or better in all courses ottered for the 
minor. Students should be aware that BIO 101, 102 are pre-requisite to all courses listed 
below. 

The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 

Biology 20 

1. 20 hours of upper division BIO courses chosen from BIO 310, 351, 
352, 353, 358, 360, 370, 380, 410, 450, 460, 480 
Botanv 20 

1. f3OT203 5 

2. 3 courses from BOT 305, 323, 410, 425 1 5 

Zoologv 2^ 

1. ZOO 204 5 

2. 3 courses from ZOO 301, 326, 355, 356, 372, 410, 429, 435 15 

Human Biology 2 

1. BIO 210 or ZOO 215 5 

2. 3 courses from BIO 310, 351, 353, 370, 380, ZOO 330 1 5 

Pre-Prof essional Programs 

Students majoring in biology may concurrently complete all pre-medical, pu- 
dental, and/or preveterinary requirements and all requirements tor stvondarv 
teaching certification in science (biology). 

Other pre-professional programs include: 

Internships. The Department offers a number of internship options in the areas 
of research, applied biology, and environmental education. It also offers programs in 
which students can work with physicians, veterinarians, and dent 

Pre-forestry program with the University of Georgia. A student may complete 
two years of a pre-forestry curriculum at Armstrong, then transfer to the University 
of Georgia. After two additional years of coursework, the student may receive a B.S. 
in Forest Resources. 

Pre-forestry/Environmental Management Affiliation with Duke University. In 
this program, a student may complete three years of study at Armstrong and then may 
apply for admission to the Ehike program. If accepted, the student may complete two 



98 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



additional years at Duke. Upon successfully completing the first year at Duke, the 
student will receive a B.S. in Biology from Armstrong; after successful completion of 
the second year, the student will receive a Master of Science degree in either forestry 
or environmental management from Duke University. 

Biotechnology. Students seeking to attain biotechnology credentials appealing to 
employers in genetic technology industries, forensic science, pharmaceuticals, agri- 
culture, aquaculture, and graduate programs may consider this track within the 
Biology Major. Pre-medical students, especially those considering biomedical re- 
search, will find this track attractive. The student completes the same required courses 
(BIO 1 01 , 1 02, BOT 203, ZOO 204, BIO 360, 370, 480 AND EITHER BOT 41 OR ZOO 410) 
as all other Biology Majors, but then chooses BIO 351, 353, and 460 and one elective 
chosen from BIO 352, 410, BOT 410, ZOO 372, 410, 429, or 435. 

Scholarships In Biology 

The department offers a limited number of scholarships to Biology majors. 
Interested students are invited to inquire in the department office for details. 

Biology Honors 

Students who perform independent biological research and submit acceptable oral 
and written reports to a departmental committee may be eligible to have "graduated 
with departmental honors" noted on their official academic records. 

To qualify for this honor, students must have at the time of application: 120-150 
quarter hours of course work; a minimum college GPA of 3.3; a minimum biology GPA 
of 3.5 with no grade lower than "C"; and three or more 300-400 level course completed. 

The committee will consist of three biology faculty, adding where applicable a 
biologist from outside the college. The committee will examine students' proposals 
before projects are undertaken and evaluate the projects at their completion. 

Biology Offerings 

BIO 101 Principles of Biology 1(4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

Structure and function of cells, biological chemistry; structure, function, and devel- 
opment of flowering plants. 

BIO 102 Principles of Biology II (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Biology 101. 

Structure, function, and development of vertebrate animals; genetics; ecology; 

evolution. 

BIO 210 Microorganisms and Disease (43-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisites: CHE 201 or 122 and ZOO 209. 
An introduction to the study of microorganisms with primary emphasis on bacteria. 
The morphology, life history, and importance to public health of representative 
bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa are considered. Credit for this course may not 
be applied toward a major in biology. 

BIO 310 Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Spring or Winter. Prerequisite: Completion of 75 quarter hours credit in college courses. 
Consideration of the interactions between humans and the support systems of the 
earth which are essential to their existence. Credit for this course may not be applied 
toward a major in biology. 

BIO 351 Bacteriology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites 10 hours of biological science, CHE 128-129. 

A study of the morphology, ecology, classification, and genetics of the bacteria and 

related micro-organisms, including the viruses. 






BIOLOGY 



Medical N1u robiologi < M-5) 

Wintei Prerequisite tth ) 151 and permission »»i the inatrw t<>r 

Acoaipfeheneivestudvol the disease i a using mu robes in terms oft hen I igi 

pathology ind epidemiolog) 

Immunology and Serology 0-4-5) 

Spring Pre r e q uisites t Hi 1 28 and 1 29 or permission of instructor and d< 

head. 

•\ fundamental stud \ oi humoral and cellular immunity, mestructureand Morn nthc 

risofanrJbodies # ana the interactions between antigens and antibodies ( onaiderauon 

will be given to allergk states and other inununologicaJ discasas 

Histological Technique (0-10-5) 

Winter rrereouisites BK) 101, and 102. 

P r incip les and methods oi killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining, and 

mounting plant and animal materials tor stud) 

Cell Structure and Function (5-0-5) 
Winter Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHE 128, 129 

An introduction to cell biology including the Btudy Oi (.t'll ultrastrUCture, tht* major 
physiological processes, cell reproduction and cell differentiation 

Genetics (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 102 or 112, CHE 128, 129; BIO 351 and junior status 

recommended. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

Human Genetic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208-209 and CHE 128-129 orCHE201 -202, orCHE 

121-122. 

An introduction to human inheritance including gene transmission, gene effects upon 

metabolism, population and quantitative genetics, genetics of sex-determination, 

pedigree analysis, eugenics, and genetic screening and counseling. 

Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least third quarter junior status; two courses in 

biology numbered 300 or above; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between microscopic anatomy and cell 

chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, and growth. 

Evolution (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Major in biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in biology courses 

numbered 300 or above). 

Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

Molecular Genetics (4-4-5) 

Prerequisite: BOT 203, ZOO 204, BIO 360, and CHE 341 . 

Detailed study of gene structure and the control of gene expression in prokaryotic. 
eukaryotic and viral systems, including topics such as replication, recombination, 
repair, mutagenesis of DNA and RNA synthesis. Recombinant DNA techniques 
and genetic engineering will be introduced. 

Seminar (1 -0-1) 

Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior Biology majors. 

Library research, class presentations, and discussions in selected areas of Bu 

General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Three courses in biology numbered 300 or above 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the welfare of humans, 

coordinated with a study of populations and communities in the field. 



100 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BIO 490 Research (V-V 5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 20 hours credit in biology courses numbered 
300 or above; a B average in biology courses and in overall work; consent of department 
head; agreement of a staff member to supervise work. 
Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the department. Supervised 
research including literature search, field and/or laboratory investigation and 
presentation of an acceptable written report of results. Credit will depend upon the 
work to be done. Both credit and proposed work must be approved in advance, ii 
writing, by the faculty member to supervise the work and by the department head. 

BIO 495/496 Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the Department 

Head. 

The student will be engaged in a biological project sponsored by an outside agency. 

The project will be selected, supervised, evaluated, and credit hours determined by 

the student's faculty advisor in consultation with the outside agency. The student 

must make application during the quarter preceding the internship. No more than 5 

(five) hours may be counted toward the major. 

Botany Offerings 

BOT201 Principles of Horticulture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: None. 

Introduction to basic gardening principles with emphasis on plant growth and 
development as responses to varying environmental conditions. Topics to be covered 
include plant classification, growth and development, environment, propagation, 
disease and pest control. This course may be applied as elective credit towards the 
B.S. degree in biology. 

BOT 203 Survey of the Plant Kingdom (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BIO 101 and 102. 

Morphology and phylogeny of the divisions of the plant kingdom, with emphasis 

upon the evolution of the land flora. 

BOT 305 Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. 

BOT 323 Plant Anatomy (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of vascular plants, and 

a comparative study of the structure of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

BOT 410 Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

A survey of physiologic processes occurring in plants and the conditions which affect 

these processes. 

BOT 425 Plant Morphology (3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: BOT 323. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, structure, reproduc- 
tion, and evolutionary relationships. 

Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 204 Survey of the Animal Kingdom (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. 

An evolutionary survey of the major animal phyla. 

ZOO 208 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and a passing grade in 
High School chemistry or CHE 201 (if the student has passed High School chemistry 
then CHE 201 is a co-requisite for ZOO 208), or CHE 121-122, or 128-129. 
A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and physiology of the human 
organ systems. Intended primarily for majors in health sciences, credit for this course 
may not be applied toward a major in biology. 



ZOOLOGY 



101 



Human Ijutomj and Phytiolog) 11 <i ; \) 

Ottered I'.uh qu.irtei Prerequisite ZOO 208 .mil completion ol 
prerequisite oi v o i«-v|tnsitc foi ZOO 2 

\ v continuation ot tin- bash count considering the anatomy and physio 
human ^ radii may not be applied toward a ma|oi In biologi 
Cardiopulmonary taatomj and Physiologi 122-D 

Spring Prerequisite A X >2lN 

Ilu- cardiopulmonary system is studied with special emphasis on functional 

anatomy 1 in- physiolog) ol the heart the control ot ^ In ulation raspiratioi 

blood pr ess ure, and partk le movement across membr a nes are also stud ied int. 

primaril) tot majors In health sciences; credit tor this murs,- ma) no! be applied 

toward a major In biology 

Human Physiology and Disease (4-2-5) 

Spring Prere q uisites A\ >206and 209orotherao eptablecoursesin humai 

or v er tebra te physiolog) 

An mtroductoiy consideration of diseaseasdisruptionol physiological homeostasis 

initial emphasis is placed on normal function, control, and environment ot cellsasa 

basis tor understanding cellular and systemic responses to agents ot miurv and 

ofganismk : effects ol thoseresponses. Intended primarily tor majors in health si iencea 

Introductory Entomology (3-4-5) 
Spring. Prerequisite: BIO 101 and 102. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identifU ation and biology 
Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 
Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural history of the 
major invertebrate groups. 

Fundamentals of Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: BIO 101 1 02 or ZOO 208-209, and CHE 121-122 

or CHE 201 

Biological bases of animal, including human, nutrition; sources and biological 

utilization and functions of nutrients. 

Embryology (4-3-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used to illustrate the bask 

principles of developmental anatomy. 

Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the vert e bra tes 

Animal Histology (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and organ s\ stems m animals 

Parasitology (3-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man and other animals. 

General Vertebrate Physiology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: Junior status, including 15 hours ot biology; Organic Chemistry 

(may be taken concurrently)- 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the vertebrates. 

Marine Invertebrate Zoology (2-6-5) 

Spring. Even numbered vears. Prerequisites: ZOO 325 or ZOO 204 with a grade ot A 
or B. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine invertebrates as 
exemplified by collection from the southeastern coastal region. 

Endocrinology (3-5) 

Offered on demand . Prerequisites: ZOO 41 or other acceptable physiology course. 
Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism and reproductive 
cycles. 



1 02 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

ZOO 435 Comparative Physiology (3-4-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: Junior status, including 15 hours of biology; 
Organic Chemistry (may be taken concurrently). 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ systems involved in the 
maintenance of homeostasis under varying conditions within normal habitats and of 
in vitro reactions of tissues and systems under laboratory conditions. 

Chemistry and Physics 

Faculty 

Harris, Henry, Department Head 

Baker, Julia Jaynes, Leon 

Brewer, John Kolodny, Robert 

Butler, Frank Martin, Keith 

Byrd, James Popieniek, Paul 

Carpenter, Suzanne * Whiten, Morris 

* Hizer, Todd Zipperer, W.C. 

* Graduate Faculty 

The department offers majors in chemistry and in the physical sciences. Minor 
concentrations are offered in chemistry, engineering studies, physical science, and 
physics. The department sponsors the Engineering Studies Program to facilitate the 
transfer of students into engineering programs. 

The major in chemistry is designed to give depth in the fields of chemistry, yet is 
flexible enough to accommodate a range of career goals. Students majoring in 
chemistry may concurrently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary 
requirements and all requirements for secondary teaching certification in science. A 
grade of "C" or better in all chemistry courses applied toward the major, and the 
successful completion of the chemistry exit exam are graduation requirements. 

The major in the physical sciences allows students to pursue a study in engineering 
and physics along with other areas of the physical sciences. 

The department participates in the Dual Degree Program of Armstrong State 
College under which students may earn simultaneously the B.S. degree with a major 
in chemistry or physical sciences from Armstrong and the baccalaureate in a field of 
engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology or one of several other 
participating schools. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101,102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

PHY 211, 212 or 217*, 218* 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 103 



tot i\ *<> 

CHI 121 I 

\i \i 206 

rm 21 ) oi 219" 

( omputei Science 01 Mathematics or Natural Science 
taea V 

ri 166 and I03or 108 

1 hree activity courses 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Major Field Requirements 

( HI Ml M2 H 491 

approved 300-400 level chemistry courses 18 

c Related Field Requirements 15 

rm 312 

CS 115, 116, 120, or 142 

Additional course in Computer 

Science, Mathematics, or Natural Sciences 

D. Elective* 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

•Recommended sequence. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

ENG 101, 102orl92,201 or 292 15 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

CHE 128, 129 Id 

Area III 20 

HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

CHE211 5 

PHY 211, 212, or 217, 218 10 

PSY101 5 

EDN200 3 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 228 5 

Area V 6 

PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 3 

B. Major Field Requirements 4^ 

CHE 341, 342, 343, 350, 380, 491 27 

CHE461 5 

Approved 300-400 level chemistry courses 13 



104 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C Related Field Requirements 25 

MAT 206 5 

BIO 101, 102 10 

PHY 213 or 219 5 

One course selected from: AST 301; GEL 301, 310; MET 301; 

OCE 301; PHY 312 5 

D. Professional sequence 35 

EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 472, 473 30 

PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

E. Regents' Examination and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 206 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
WITH A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from: 

ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

One course selected from: 

ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

PHY 211, 212, 213 or PHY 217, 218, 219 15 

MAT 206, 207, 208 15 

Area V 11 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

PHY 312 5 

Ten hours chosen from: 

AST, GEL, MET, OCE 10 

Thirty hours selected from the following with a maximum 

of 15 hours from any one area: 
CHE 211, 300-400 CHE courses; EGR 220, 221, 300-400 EGR courses; 

300-400 PHY courses 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

CS246 5 

CS or MAT 20 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 201 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 105 



Minor Concentrations 

I he minoi in ( hemistr) requires twenty i redil noun with grades oi ttei In 

upper division ». hemistry courses 

1 he minor in Engineering Studies requires EGR 100, 171 220 221, plus in hours 
<. hosen from uppei ah Ision engineering eta rives foi .» total oi 26 quarta i redil hours 
a grade oi si least c in each course > s required. 

the minor m Physics requires twenty three credit hours from mu: ^nated 

.is physics numbered ~i i or higher. A grade ot c or better in eat h i ourse is required 

I ho minor in Physical Sciences requires ten credit hours ot i labor ato ry lequence 
m chemistry, physical science, or physics plus fifteen hours chosen from am 101, 
CHE K)1,GE1 301,GE1 310, MET H)1,OCE301 A grade oi c ¥ or better is required in 
each course 

The ASC Engineering Transfer Program 

The ASC Engineering Transfer Program offers course work contained in the first 
two years oi the standard engineering curriculum at most accredited engineering 
Schools After following the suggested course sequence at Armstrong State, a student 
should be able to transfer to any ABET accredited engineering school and complete the 
requirements tor a baccalaureate in a chosen field of engineering in a total of four to 
five years, which is the time typical of all engineering students. The program of courses 
has been constructed with advice from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Students 
are advised to contact the engineering school of choice on questions of transfer. 

Chemistry Offerings 

CHE 121/122 Introduction to Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 101 . (Credit in these courses may not be applied to 
a major in chemistry.) 

These courses include a study of the fundamental laws and theories of inorganic 
chemistry, a survey of organic chemistry, and an introduction to biochemistry. 

CHE 128/129 General Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: College Algebra or concurrently. Offered each quarter. 
These courses are the first two of the series 128,129,211 required to complete an 
academic year of general chemistry. A study of the fundamental principles and laws 
of chemistry with a quantitative approach to the subject. These courses are designed 
for the science, pre-medical and engineering student. The laboratory work includes 
an understanding of fundamental techniques. 

CHE 201 Essentials of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, and biochemistry with emphasis on applica- 
tions in human physiology and clinical chemistry. Experimental principles will he 
illustrated with classroom demonstrations. 

CHE 202 Physical Principles (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 201. 

This course provides a study of the physical principles of gas behavior, acid-base 

calculations, weak acid ionization, buffer solutions, pH measurements, blood gas 

measurements, and other subjects of special interest to persons in the allied health 

sciences. 

CHE 211 Chemical Principles (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 129. Fall and Spring. 

This course is the third in the sequence 128, 129, 211 required to complete an 
academic year of general chemistry. Stresses chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, 
and equilibria. 



106 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 






CHE 301 The Chemistry of Life (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. Offered on demand. 
An introductory course covering selected areas of applied biochemistry. This 
course is not recommended for chemistry, biology, or premedical students. 

CHE 307 Principles of Chemical Processes (3-3) 

Prerequisites: CHE 1 29 and MAT 206. 

Methods of material balance in chemical process are studied. Topic subjects include 
processes and process variables, systems of units, gas behavior, single-phase and 
multi-phase systems. TEXT: Level of Felder and Rousseau Elementary Principles of 
Chemical Processes. 

CHE 308 Principles of Chemical Processes II (3-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 307. 

Methods of energy balance in chemical processes are studied . Various forms of energy 

changes involved in both reactive and non-reactive processes are introduced. 

Emphasis is placed on the application of combined material and energy balances in 

processes. TEXT: Level of Felder and Rousseau Elementary Principles of Chemical 

Processes. 

CHE 341/342 Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. Fall, Winter. 

These courses include the study of aliphatics, aromatic hydrocarbons and their 
derivatives, polyfunctional compounds, and polynuclear hydrocarbons. Organic 
reactions are emphasized in terms of modern theory. 

CHE 343 Organic Chemistry (43-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Spring. 

A continuation of the organic chemistry sequence 341 ,342. This course completes the 
fundamental study of organic chemistry with a consideration of carbohydrates, 
amino acids, and heterocyclics with their related compounds. 

CHE 350 Chemical Literature (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to the use of the chemical library, the important journals, references 
and other information sources. Information will be collected, organized, and orally 
presented as a seminar. 

CHE 380 Quantitative Instrumental Analysis (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 1 29. Winter and Summer. 

A study of the principles of volumetric, spectrophotometer, electrometric and 

chromatographic methods of analysis. 

CHE 397 Scientific Glass-Blowing (0-4-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Offered on demand. 
Properties of glass for scientific apparatus; introduction of glass working equipment; 
planning of sequential joining operations; demonstration of major techniques for joining 
and working glass; supervision of individual students in preparing test pieces. 

CHE 400 Seminar (V-(l-3)) 

Offered Fall quarter. 

Students will make oral presentations on selected topics. 

CHE 410 Chemical Safety (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 341 . Offered on demand. 

Topic subjects will include standard laboratory safety practices, hazardous proper- 
ties of chemicals, safety practices in the storage, use and disposal of chemicals, and 
government regulations. 

CHE 421 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380, CHE 491 . Offered on demand. 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase students' understanding of 

mechanisms of chemical reactions. Emphasizes the periodicity of elements. Students 

will carry out extensive literature searches and participate in inorganic laboratory 

research. 






CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 107 



idvanctd OiftanU ( hemistr) <^ I I) 
Prerequisite till M ^ Spring 
\ turihri stiui\ of import. mt organit reactions rmphasi/iti) 

m«-v Kanism ol organk >. hemistr} 

Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-M-S) 

Prerequisite ( hi 143 Offered on demand 

Syttematfc spprosx h to tin- Identification of organk i ompoundi 

History of ( hemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites funior standing and ( HE 129 

rhe devel o pment ol science surveyed from antiquity to the pretenl Emphatif li 

placed on the development ol ideas, signifti inl contributions, evolution of< hemica! 

t h eo r ies, and the modern social implii stions ol si lent t 

Biochemistry (5-0-5) 

P rere q uisite CHE M3 Offered on demand. 

Astud) o\ the JuMmcalnatureot cellular constituentsaiukellular metabolism Subject 

topics nu lude carbohydrates, proteins! lipids, enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes, 
snaerobi< carbohydrate metabolism! lipid metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid 

oxidative phosphorylation, and photosynthesis 

Biochemistry (5-0-5) 

P rere q uisite: CHE 461 . Ottered on demand. 

A study of the metabolism of ammonia and nitrogen-containing compounds, the 

biosynthesis ot 'nucleic acids and proteins, metabolic regulation, and selected topics 

Biochemistry Laboratory (0-6-2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 461 . Offered on demand . 

A study of techniques used in biochemistry research. Topic subjects include separation, 

purification and characterization procedures. 

Advanced Instrumental Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380. 

A study of electrometric methods of analysis. Topic subjects will include potentiomet- 

ric, coulometric, and polarographic measurements. 

Advanced Instrumental Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: CHE 380 and PHY 312. 

A study of spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods of analysis. Topic 
subjects will include visible and ultra-violet spectroscopy, gas-liquid chromatogra- 
phy, high performance liquid chromatography, atomic emission and absorption 
spectroscopy. 

Advanced Instrumental Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: CHE 342 and 482. 

A continuation of the study of spectroscopy. Topic subjects will include infrared 

spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electronspin resonance and mass 

spectrometry. 

CHE 491/492 

/493 Physical Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 211, 380, PHY 213, MAT 206. Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the study of solids, liquids, 
gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solutions. These courses will also cover 
a study of chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum 
mechanics and nuclear chemistry. 

Internship (V-V(l -12)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisites: CHE 343, 380, 491 and permission of 
the Chemistry Intern Program Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry, government or other 
institutional setting. The project will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by 
the sponsor of the activity and the student's faculty adviser. Application and 
arrangement must be made through the department by mid-quarter preceding the 
quarter of internship. Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean 
of the Faculty at Armstrong and the appropriate official of the school from which 
the student comes. 



108 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CHE 497/498 

/499 Independent Study (V-V-(l -5)) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Head of the Department. Offered each quarter. 
Designed to permit qualified students to pursue supervised individual research or 
study. Emphasis will be placed on the literature search, laboratory experimentation, 
and presentation of an acceptable written report. Both the credit and proposed work 
must be approved in writing by the faculty member who will supervise the work 
and by the department head. Open to transient students only with the permission 
of the Dean of the Faculty at Armstrong and of the college from which the student 



Engineering Offerings 

EGR 100 Introduction to Engineering (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Eligibility to enter MAT 101 and ENG 101. 

A comprehensive orientation to the engineering process from problem formulation to 

the evolution of creative design; fundamental concepts from various fields of 

engineering. 

EGR 171 Engineering Graphics (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103, CS 1 16. 

Computer-aided graphics and engineering design fundamentals. Spatial analysis 

axioms, projection theory, sketching, creating design, geometric dimensioning, and 

tolerancing. 

EGR 220 Statics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 21 7 and MAT 207. 

Concepts of forces, moments, and other vector quantities; analysis of two-and-three- 
dimensional force systems; conditions of equilibrium; friction; centroids and moments 
of inertia. 

EGR 221 Dynamics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 220 and MAT 208. 

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using 
force-mass-acceleration, work-energy, and momentum methods in two-and-three- 
dimensional motion. 

EGR 322 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 22(). 

Internal effects and dimension changes of solids resulting from externally applied 
loads; shear and bending moment diagrams; analysis of stress and strain; beam 
deflection; column stability. 

EGR 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 341 . 
Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's 
and Norton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and two-port param- 
eters. 

EGR 311 Electronics 1(5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: EGR 310. 

Introduction to P-N junction theory and the concepts of solid-state devices; develop- 
ment of the electrical characteristics of diodes and transistors; bipolar and field-effect 
amplifying circuits; operational amplifiers and analog systems. 

EGR 312 Electronics 11(2-6) 

Prerequisite: EGR 31 1 . 

Operation and application of integrated circuits used in digital systems; gates, flip- 
flops, counters, registers and memory devices. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 109 



I GR 123 Fluid Mtchaala (5-0-3) 

ftercquisites I GR221 I GR 130 sndMAI 141 

Fluid Statics snslysisof fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and ei 

conservation relationships; introduction to viscous flow 

■GR330 rhcrmodynamici 1(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites PH> 217and MAT2 

Bsafc oonceptsoJ merrnodynamics; pr op e r ties of substarx es;< onservation prim iples; 

me first and second laws oi mermodynamk s; entrop) ; analysis of mermodynainii 

lystems 
EGR 331 Thermodynamics 11(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite BGR 130 

c ..is cy< les; vapor >. w les; thermodynamk relationships; mermodynamk behavior 

oi real gases; non resM ting gas mixtures; mermodynamk sol i Kemk .il r»-.u tions 

EGR 332 Heat Transfer (5-5) 
Prerequisite BGR 12 ; 

The fundamental prindpleol heal transfer; steady snd transienl conduction in solids; 
introduction to convective heal rranarer; thermal radiation. 

EGR 350 Computer Applications In Engineering (2-3-3) 
Prerequisites: ( S 246 BGR 221, EGR 310, EGR 323 
llieapplicationofdigital computers to thesolutionoi selec ied engineering problems 

iLsm^; 

FORTRAN; emphasis on problem analysis and solution techniques. 

EGR 370 Engineering Economic Analysis (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: MAT 206 and ECO 202. 

Fundamental principles and basic techniques of economic analysis of engineering 
projects including economic measure of effectiveness; time value of money, cost 
estimation, breakeven and replacement analysis. 

EGR 396 Engineering Internship (V-V-U -12)) 

Prerequisites: EGR 1 71 , EGR 322, and permission of the Engineering Intern Program 

Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry or government. The project 

will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the sponsor of the activity and 

the Engineering Intern Program Director. Application and arrangement must be made 

through the department by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. 

Physical Science Offerings 

PHS121 Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and concepts of physics and astronomy. 
This course is designed for non-science majors interested in a descriptive survey. The 
laboratory study is designed to supplement the study of theory. 
PHS122 Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, geology, 
meteorology and physical oceanography. This is a descriptive course which includes 
the classification of elements, basic chemical reactions, and atomic structure designed 
for the non-science major. The laboratory study includes experiences which augment 
class discussion. 

AST 301 Introduction to Astronomy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. Winter. 
A study of the planetary system, stars, stellar structure, and cosmology- 
GEL 301 Introduction to Physical Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science completed. 
An introduction to physical geology. A study of common earth materials, dynamic 
processes of change, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure and 
evolution of the earth's crust and inner regions. 



110 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GEL 310 Introduction to Historical Geology (5-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science. 

An introduction to historical geology. A study of the earth's origin and the changes 

through time. 

MET 301 Introduction to Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed . Spring. 

An introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and to the physical 

laws that describe atmospheric phenomena. 

OCE 301 Introduction to Oceanography (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science completed. Of fered on demand. 
A study of the basic principles of oceanography. Topic subjects to include the 
distribution of water over the earth, nature and relief of the ocean floors, tides and 
currents, chemical properties of sea water and constituents, and applications of 
oceanographic research. 

Physics Offerings 

PHY 211 Mechanics (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103. Fall. 

The first part of the sequence PHY 211-212-213 in general physics. Basic classical 

physics, including mechanics, sound, and heat. Designed for students with aptitude 

in mathematics below the level of calculus. Selected experiments to demonstrate 

applications. 

PHY 212 Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and PHY 211. Winter. 

The second part of the sequence PHY 211212-213. Basic electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 213 Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (4-25) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and PHY 212. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 211-212-213. Continues the study of light from the 
viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study of atomic and nuclear 
physics. Laboratory work includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHY 217 Mechanics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: MAT 206. Fall and Spring. 

The first part of the sequence PHY 217-218-219 in general physics. Basic classical 

physics, including mechanics, sound and heat. Designed especially for engineering 

students and recommended for science majors. Selected experiments to demonstrate 

applications. 

PHY 218 Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (5-3-6) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 or concurrently and PHY 21 7. Winter. 

The second part of the sequence PHY 217218-219. Basic electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 219 Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 217-218-219. Continues the study of light from the 
viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study of atomic and nuclear 
physics. Laboratory work includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHY 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 341 . 

Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's and 

Norton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and two-port parameters. 

PHY 312 Digital Electronics (3-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 103 and ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. 
An introduction to discrete component and integrated circuits used in modern digital 
electronics. The primary objective of this course is to give students hands-on 
experience in constructing and investigating an array of digital circuits that are 
directly applicable in instrumentation. 



GOVERNMENT Ht 



rm Mechanic! of Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite 1 1 

Internal effe< ta and dimension < hanget o( solids resultii ill) spotted 

. iheai and bending moment diagrams snalysJi ol atreaf and strain 
deflection column stability 

JH\ H3 Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prereauisites:EGR221 EGR PH\ 130, and MAI Wl 

Fluid Statics anal) lis of fluid motion using the* ontinuity, momentum, and* 

co ns ervation relationships; introduction to viscous flows 
I'm 330 ThermodvnamKs 1 (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites ?H\ 217andMA1 

Basic concepts oi thermodynamics: properties of substances; conservation principles; 

the tirst and second laws oi thermodynamics; entropy; snalysis oi thermodynamic 

s\ stems 
VH\ 380 Introductory Quantum Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 213orPm 219 and MAI 207. Offered on demand 

An introduction to quantum mechanical principles with applications in atomic and 

molecular structure. 

Prtt 417 Mechanics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: rm 217 or 211 and MAT 207. PHY 218 or 212 and MAT 341 are 

recommended . Ottered on demand . 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and ot systems oi particles art' 

developed using Newtonian principles. 

Government 

Faculty 

Vacant, Department Head 

Brown, George * Murphy, Dennis 

* Ealy, Steven * Palmiotto, Michael 
Kearnes, John * Rhee, Steve 

* Megathlin, William 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Department of Government embraces the ideal of liberal education and views 
education in related professional areas as an extension, rather than the antithesis, of 
liberal education. Consequently, all departmental programs and courses are concep- 
tually-based, thereby enabling students to develop a theoretical sophistication applicable 
to practical realities. So conceived, courses and programs achieve auricular integrity. 

The Department firmly believes that even curricular integrity is not enough, 
however. Instructional effectiveness is its inseparable complement, and attainment 
of these twin goals serves as the primary purpose of the Department of Government. 
The ongoing program of faculty development ensures that the staff of highly qualified 
educators — each selected for service on the basis of solid professional credentials — 
continually achieves that primary purpose. 

In addition, the Department of Government highlv values both research and 
service. To the extent of resources available, the Department encourages research bv 
both faculty and students and service to the School, the College and the communitv. 

It is within the foregoing context that the Department of Government offers 
criminal justice and political science minors through the Brunswick Center, requires 
the G.R.E. or Political Science Major Field Achievement Test as an exit examination 
for its majors and offers the following on-campus undergraduate programs, concentra- 
tions and courses. 



1 1 2 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CORRECTIONS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; or MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252, POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101, SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290, 301, 303, 360, and one CJ elective 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; or MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290, 301, 305, and two CJ electives 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 

At least 45 hours of each of these two programs must be completed at Armstrong. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 
(With P.O.S.T. Certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; or MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 or 167 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 104, 204, 210, 280, 290, 301, 305 
C P.O.S.T. Certification 

CJ 426, 460, PSY 208, PE 167 18 

D. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 111 

NOTE: Students desiring P.O.S.T. Certification must see the Criminal Justice Training 
Center Director for advisement on P.O.S.T. requirements. 



GOVERNMENT 113 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 

Students who intend tomsjorini ttminal Justice should ( omplete( riminal Justice MX) 
pefore the end oi the freshman year end should complete ill general edw stlon require 
menta as soon ,»s pos si ble 

Hours 

a c ieneraJ Requirements 

Ares l 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192,201 or2^2 15 

2 ART 200, 271 272 273 MUS 200; PHI 201; ENG 222 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 10 V 195, 220, or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, H5of 192;POS113 15 

2. SCX: 201 ; PSY 101; ECO 201 or 202; ANT 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290 20 

2. One course selected from: 

ANT 201, ECO 201, 202, DRS 228, SOC 201, PSY 101 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Area of Concentration 30 

1. CJ 301, 303, 305, 360, 390, and 440 or 490 30 

C Electives from Related Areas 65 

1. Sixty-five hours chosen with advisor approval. 

Except for students pursuing a minor in another department, 
no more than fifteen hours may be taken from any one 
department except Government. Seven of these courses 

must be 300-400 level courses 65 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



Majors In Political Science 

The major in Political Science may take three distinct forms: Political Science, 
per se, Political Science with Teacher Certification, or Political Science with a concentra- 
tion in Public Administration. 

To complete a Political Science major requires forty quarter hours of upper division 
courses in the field with grades of "C" or better in each course. Further, the program 
must include at least one course from each of the following: American Political 
Institutions, International Relations, Political Theory, and Comparative Govern- 
ment. The major allows the option of a foreign language (French or German preferred) 
through the 103 level or a sequence of computer science courses. Students who 
contemplate graduate work in Political Science are strongly advised to take the foreign 
language option and to continue their linguistic study beyond the 103 level. 

Programs in Public Administration and Political Science with Teacher Certification 
are more structured in order to prepare students adequately to meet the demands of their 
professions and appropriate licensing agencies. 



114 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Scholarships In Political Science 

Limited scholarship aid is available annually. Interested students are invited to 
inquire in the Department of Government office for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 86 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; BIO 111, 112; 

CHE 121, 122, PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 20 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. One of the sequences: 

A. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 or 

B. CS 115, 142, and 231 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

At least one course from each of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 

POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 418, 419, CJ 390 5-25 

2. International Affairs — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 426, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 

POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5-25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 35 

To be chosen in fields such as Computer Science, Economics, 
Geography, Mathematics. See Department for exhaustive list 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations .~ 

TOTAL 191 



GOVERNMENT 115 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

•\ General Requirement! N 

Area i 20 

1 BNG101 102 or 192 201 or 292 15 

: Ch* course frotri aki BNG 222; MUS 200 PHI 201 

Ana li 20 

1. MAT 101 . 220 10 

2 1 iboratorv science sequence 10 

Area in 20 

1 HIS 114 or 191, 115 Of W; POS 113 

2. PS\ 101 5 

Area IV 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 or CS 115, 142,231 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 60 

At least one course from each of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 

POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 418, 419; CJ 390 5-25 

2. International Relations — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 426, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 ...'. 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 

POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5-25 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the following areas: 

A. HIS 251 or 252 and approved 300+ elective 

B. ECO 201 and approved 300+ elective 

C. Approved electives in behavioral sciences (ANT, PSY, SOC) 
D.GEO 211, 212 

C. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL 
SCIENCE(PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 



116 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 121, 122; PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113; ECO 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. CS 142, 231, 242 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252; ECO 202; SOC 201 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. One course from each of the following 20 

A. American Political Institutions — 

POS 305, 317, 318, 360, 411, 412, 415, 419 5 

B. International Affairs — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 426, 429 5 

C. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 5 

D. Comparative Government — 

POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5 

2. Public Administration 

PA/POS 303, 401, 403, 418; CJ 390 25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. CS 301, 308 10 

2. SOC 350 or MAT 220 5 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of Government offers a number of minor concentrations. 

A minor in Criminal Justice or in Political Science has great practical value. Its 
notation on the transcript indicates to an employer that the applicant has some solid 
liberal arts background with its accompanying insight into the development and 
functioning of modern society, and that the applicant has made an extra effort to refine 
research and writing skills so essential to dealing with that society. Whatever the 
major one chooses, such a minor will strengthen the student's academic record. 

Minor concentrations are available in International Studies, Russian Studies, 
Public Administration, Criminal Justice, Political Science, and Legal Studies. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or better in each course, require: 

Hours 
Legal Studies 25 

1. CJ/POS 360, CJ 460, and POS 317 or 318 15 

2. Two courses from: CJ 380, CJ 391, CJ/POS 447, POS 326, 

POS 415, POS 418 10 

International Studies 25 

(assumes competency in one modern foreign language through the 103 level). 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 321, 345, 346, 348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 426, 429; HIS 323, 330, 455, 564, 569, 591 10 



GOVERNMENT 117 



Political s v lencc 

[Went] hours oi IOOh level POS courses, with at least one 
course from each oi die four concentration areas ol POS 

Russian Studies 

i Rl S 201 (assumes completion of RUS 101 103) 5 

: POS AS 

rwo courses from HIS 129 130 181 I n 6 140 10 

ia nuiltt departmental minor) 

Public Administration 2^ 

q 00 PA 103 401 103 ns 25 

Criminal fustiCC 2^ 

Q) X)1 and any one course from 

i I $90,410,425 126 or 447 25 

Criminal Justice Offerings 

C| 100 Administration of Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility tor ENG 101. 
This survey course examinee the emergence and current state oi formal institutions 

established within the American experience to deal with criminal behavior 
Philosophical, cultural, social and political aspects oi the justice system and 
processes will be examined. Emphasis will be given to the current political and 
bureaucratic realities of the system's administration and to related public policy 
issues stemming from the profound transformation of American society as the next 
centurv approaches. 

CJ 103 Developing Interpersonal Communication Skills (5-0-5) 

The emphasis of this course will be placed upon the development of interpersonal 
communication skills, i.e. skills that can be effectively utilized on the job to improve 
interaction among employees and between employees and the public. 

CJ 104 Introduction to Law Enforcement (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or permission of the instructor. 

This course provides an introduction to the history, philosophy, and basic objectives 
of the police system in the United States and Georgia. This course will treat 
applications of the law which a law enforcement officer must know when conducting 
law enforcement activities. 

CJ 204 Criminal Investigation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

Introduction to investigative methodology. Special techniques employed in criminal 
investigation, such as crime scene searches, the use of informants, and the techniques 
of surveillance will be emphasized as well as the presentation of police cases in court. 

CJ 210 Criminology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

The nature and extent of crime in the United States; assessment and evaluation of 
various factors and influences that lead to criminal behavior; various measures 
proposed for the control of criminal behavior. 

CJ 250 Directed Readings In Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. 

A course designed to permit each student to pursue an approved topic through 

independent study and research under the guidance and direction of the instructor. 

CJ 280 Ethics In Criminal Justice Practice and Research (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: CJ 1 00 or POS 1 1 3 or consent of the instructor. 

Analysis of ethical concepts, principles, and prescriptive moral judgments in the 

practice and research of criminal justice. 

CJ 290 Criminal Procedure (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CJ 360 or consent of instructor. 

A survey of the distinctive features of, and the basis for, American criminal law- 
buttressed by an analysis of leading court decisions relative to procedural rights 
emanating from the Bill of Rights. 



118 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CJ 301 Juvenile Delinquency (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of instructor. 

A survey of theories of juvenile delinquency; the sociological, biological, and 
psychological factors involved in juvenile delinquency and the modern trends in 
prevention and treatment. 

CJ 302 Criminalistics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: A natural science laboratory sequence or consent of instructor. 
An introduction to the problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. 
Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with the role of science and 
technology in modern law enforcement. 

CJ 303 Penology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100, or consent of instructor. 

This course deals with the analysis and evaluation of both historical and contem- 
porary correctional systems. This course will also deal with the development, 
organization, operation and results of the different systems of corrections found in 
America. 

CJ 304 Probation and Parole (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 303 or consent of instructor. 

This course will deal with the development, organization, operation and results of 

systems of probation and parole as substitutes for incarceration. 

CJ 305 Law Enforcement Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 1 00 or consent of instructor. 
An introduction to the philosophical, cultural and historical background of the police 
idea. The course is conceptually oriented and will deal with concepts such as the role 
of the police in contemporary society, the quasi-military organization of the police, 
and community relations. 

CJ 307 Community Based Treatment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 303 or consent of instructor. 
This course will investigate the different community based treatment programs. An 
emphasis will be placed on investigating the function of halfway houses and the use 
of volunteers in corrections. 

CJ 360 Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 113 or consent of the instructor. 
Examination of law as a dynamic societal institution. Sources and functions of both 
civil and criminal law, as well as operation of the legal process, are studied from 
the perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and sociology. (Identical with 
POS 360.) 

CJ 380 Law of Evidence (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 360 or consent of instructor. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evidence in criminal cases. Particular subjects 

will include burden of proof, hearsay evidence, and the principles of exclusion and 

selection. 

CJ390 Research Methods (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 and permission of instructor. 

This course deals with the methods and techniques of research in the behavioral 

sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to evaluate research. 

CJ 391 Legal Research/Law Mini-Thesis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CJ 360, ENG 102. 

Open to students of any major, this course comprises the major areas of legal research 
and writing; finding and using appropriate legal research tools and resources and 
applying these to develop and complete a scholarly legal research paper. 

CJ 399 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (5-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Coverage of substantive topics, problems and issues, not covered in other courses 
which are of contemporary importance to students in criminal justice. Topics to b< 
announced before each offering of the course. 






GOVERNMENT 119 



C ) 411) C nminalit\ .nul \bnormal BcllAVioi (5-0»5) 

Prerequisite I liv;ibiiit\ foi I \c . 101 and eithei ( I i |)(l M peffmasston "i InstriM toi 
rhc course examine* tin- Interface betw e e n ebnormal behavkM Iim hiding mental 
illness m\,\ , i imuKihtN in presenting recent development! In the identification 
classification, and tr ea tm e n t of criminals Spe< ial emphasis is given to understanding 
the sometimes bizarre beha> ioralpatternsand motivations of repeat offenders, such 
.»n ,. hild m ol e st efi sex .. riminals, perpetrators of domeetfc \ iolenoti addicts, serial 
mu r derers and rapisti 

c ) 42=i Drug i nforcementj [tract ind Pioblcnu (5-0-5) 

Pre r equisite c I 100 Open to seniors only or by consent of instructof 
\surve) of historicaland contemporar) drug la* enfon emerti In American soi lety 
sik h topics as drug distribution, gangs, and govenunentdtag-enforcementagem lea, 
policies, and techniques w ill be examined 

CI 42b International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites POS113orC I I00,orconsentof instructor 

Investigation of the political, legal, and sociological aspects ol International 
terrorism [bpicsto be examined include the reiationshipsoi international terrorism, 
International relations, and principles of Internationa] law, the nature of the anti- 
terrorist response, and the implications oi international terror ism for the future. 
(Identical with POS 426.) 

CJ 440 Seminar in Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite CJ 390 or equivalent; open to Seniors only or by consent of instructor. 
An intensive study of selected criminal justice topics. Students will have the 
opportunity to conduct criminal justice research in approved areas of interest. 

CI 44" Comparative Judicial Systems (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CJ 305 or CJ/ POS 360 or POS 41 5 or consent of 
the instructor. 

Focuses on the law enforcement and judicial procedure aspects of the Japanese, French, 
West German, and Soviet political systems. (Identical with POS 447) 

CJ 450 Field Experience I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal justice majors 
only and by invitation of the instructor. 

The purpose of this course is to broaden the educational experience of students through 
appropriate observation and work assignments with criminal justice agencies. The 
course will be organized around specific problem orientations with operational 
research connotations. Students will be expected to spend a minimum of five hours per 
week in the participating agency. Open to transient students only with permission 
of the school dean at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

CJ 451 Field Experience II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal justice majors 
only and by invitation of the instructor. 

This is a sequential course to CJ 450 which will permit the student to broaden further 
his perspectives. Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean 
at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

CJ 4527453 

/454 Internship (V-V-5) 

Offerred each quarter. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunitv to apply academic 
training in the practical governmental setting. Setting will include law enforcement 
agencies (local, state, or federal), community treatment facilities, courts, congres- 
sional offices, and various governmental agencies. This course will be jointly 
supervised by departmental instructors and agency officials. Open to transient 
students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. (Identical with PA/POS 432-453-454.) 



120 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CJ 460 Criminal Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ/POS 360 or permission of instructor. 
Examination of criminal deviant behavior from society's perspective in both the 
defining of crimes and the prosecution/conviction/punishment of those engaging 
in such behavior. Georgia criminal law will be highlighted. 

CJ 490 Directed Research In Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: CJ 390. 
A course designed to provide qualified students the opportunity to perform 
suitable and meaningful research into some area of criminal justice under the 
direction of the instructor. Open to transient students only with permission of the 
school dean at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

Political Science and Public Administration Offerings 

POS 113 American Government (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A study of the structure, theory, and functions of the national government in the 

United States, and some of the major problems of the state and local government. 

PA/POS 303 Foundations of Public Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the framework of public administration including such concepts and 
issues as bureaucracy, administrative power, informal groups, third party govern- 
ment, issue networks, budgeting, implementation, incremental decision making, 
personnel motivation, and the relationship of ethics and public service. 

POS 305 State and Local Government (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative study of states, communities, and local governments, and their 
management of political conflict. Included is a study of federalism, differences in 
governmental structures and functions, political culture, community power, tax and 
budget systems, and public policy issues facing states and communities. 

POS 317 Constitutional Law and the Federal System (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

A case-study approach to the judicial interpretation of the Constitution, and the 
powers of the federal government. Including: the nature and scope of judicial review, 
commerce power, separation of powers, power to tax and spend, state power to 
regulate, and economic due process. 

POS 318 Constitutional Civil Liberties (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

A case study approach to the judicial interpretation of individual rights and the 
Constitution. Including: nationalization of the Bill or Rights, criminal due process, 
freedom of expression, association, religion and privacy, and equal protection and 
due process. 

POS 320 International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 

Examines the economic importance and problems of international trade, exchange 
rates and monetary standards, tariffs and other trade barriers. Attention will be 
focused on fixed and floating exchange rates and their effects on trade balances of 
states. Current debt problems of developing nations will be examined. (Identical with 
ECO 320.) 

POS 321 International Relations: The Far East (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Contemporary international politics in the Far East are examined in terms of such 
broad historical trends as the decline of imperialism, the development of national- 
ism, and the rise of the U.S., U.S.S.R., People's Republic of China, and Japan as major 
powers in Asia. Some attention will be given to contemporary key issues such as the 
Sino-Soviet conflict, the future of Formosa, U.S. -Japan Mutual Security Treaty 
revision, and U.S. -Japan economic interaction. 



GOVERNMENT 121 



POS 325 International Organization. (5-0-5) 

P rerequisite POSH I or permission of instnictoi 

\ stirvej oi the d ev el opment principles itructuresand hmctfontoi mtrrn.ition.il 
organizations with emphasis upon the role of these institutions in the maintenance 
oi peace 

POS 326 International law (SOS) 

P rerequisite i'O s 1 1 lot permission ofinstructoi 

An lntrodu< bon to seta ted publk International law topk i Iim hiding m ognitkm, 

state succession^ jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, the lam "t treaties, the law 

oi diplomacy, and the law oi wta 
POS 329 International Relations (5-0-5) 

Pre req uisite POSH J or permission of Instructor. 

An Introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating contemporar) 

international relations 

POS 333 Contemporary Political Thought (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

Analysis of the important ideological currents of our time with selected in -depth 
readings from original sources. 

POS 334 Political Philosophy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of the political ideas of leading political theorists, beginning with 
Socrates and extending to the end of the 19th Century. Selected primary source 
material will be read and analyzed. 

POS 345 Latin American Politics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of governments and political processes of selected nations in South 
America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Roles of state terrorism, revolutionary 
movements, and narco-terrorism are examined. 

POS 346 Governments of East Asia (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes, and 
ideas of the People's Republic of China, Japan, and Korea. Examines the development 
of these political systems with particular emphasis on historical, social, cultural, 
and contemporary-issue dimensions. 

POS 348 Governments of Western Europe (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

An analytical and comparative study of the major Western European governments, 
with principal emphasis upon the analysis of the conditions which led to effective 
and stable parliamentary government and those which lead to the inefficiency, 
instability and breakdown of such systems. 

POS 349 Government of the Soviet Union (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

The primary purpose of this course is to focus on the study of contemporary Soviet 
politics along developmental scheme. Comparison of the pre-modern Tsarist auto- 
cratic regime and the contemporary Soviet totalitarian regime will be attempted. 
Also the course will cover such topics as Soviet political culture, political socializa- 
tion process of the mass, governmental processes, and the public policy making/ 
implementation aspects. 

POS 360 Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 1 00 or POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of law as a dynamic societal institution. Sources and functions of both 

civil and criminal law, as well as operation of the legal process, are studied from the 

perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and sociology. (Identical with CJ 

360). 

POS 400 Seminar In Political Science (5-0-5) 

Admission will be subject to approval of the instructor. Offered on demand. Designed 
to permit superior students to pursue research ai.d reading in some field of political 
science under the supervision of the staff. 



122 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PA/POS 401 Politics of the Budgetary Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

This course examines the procedures, strategies and rationales involved in making 
public budgets at the local, state, and national levels. It is also concerned with 
critiques of the several types of budgets now in use together with an explanation of 
fiscal and monetary policies as they affect budgeting. Finally, it is concerned with 
the revenue systems in effect together with auditing and other controls exercised in 
the budgeting process. 

PA/POS 403 Public Policy Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 303 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is primarily concerned with a study of the theoretical aspects of decision- 
making theories (i.e., rational/comprehensive model vs. incremental model), 
political aspects of policy-making process, mobilization of political support, and 
the cost/benefit aspects of the public policy-making. 

Some attempt will be made to apply the general theory of public policy-making to 
specific settings of welfare policy, urban problems, and national defense/ foreign 
policy. 

POS 410 Independent Study In American Government (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 
Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in some 
field of political science under the supervision of a member of the staff. Emphasis 
will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports and essays. 
Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science and at 
least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department by mid- 
quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 
Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

POS 411 American Presidency (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Offers an in-depth look at the office of the presidency, with the principal emphasis 
on the relations of the executive branch with the Congress and the court system. Some 
attention will be given to the evolution of the presidency to its present dominant 
position in the American political process. (Completion of a survey course in American 
History is desirable). 

POS 412 American Political Parties (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Operation of political parties in the political system. Relationship between party 

organization, electoral system, and the recruitment and advancement of political 

leaders. 

POS 415 American Supreme Court (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions of the Court, including examination of the 

role of the Court as policy maker. 

PA/POS 418 Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

This course explores the framework of law governing administrative agencies 

including: administrative power and its control by the courts, the determination and 

enforcement of administrative programs, discretion of administrative officials and 

their powers of summary actions, hearings before administrative boards, and the 

respective spheres of administrative and judicial responsibility. 

Some attention will be given to the problem of the maintenance of traditional 

procedural safeguards in administrative law and the problem of civil rights and 

relation to administrative boards. Leading cases will be examined. 



GOVERNMENT 123 



\meruan C If^ l fff 1^-0 -5) 

Prerequisite l\ >^ 1 1 \ or permission of instructoi 

fcnanalysis 1. 1 the structure and functions of ( 

tin-orftu.il framework foi repr es ents th egovernment and< ongresi roleaspolic) 

maker 

[ndcpcndeilt Much In International Relations i\ \ i 1 S)» 

Prerequisite \ minimum of 1 20 credit hours, including si lessl 20 hours in Politics! 

Science il the ; *h' level cm shove Admission is by ■pprovsJ of .< departmental 

committee 

rVii^nfrltnprnnitwinfrinrihMlnititfipiiriiif Indhrktmlirsasn hand reading in some 

field of LnternstionsJ relations under the supervision of .« membei of th»- sutt 

Emphasis will be on wide reading, con fe rences with the advisee snd written reports 

sno essa) i Normally open only tostudents ivithaBsverageO.O) in Political Science 

snd tl least i ~ 5 ( !PA overall Applications must in- filed with tin- 1 tepartmenl by 

mid quarter preceding the quart en independent study is con t emplated 

Open to transient students only with permission of thesi hool deanal Ajinstnongand 

the college mom which the student comes 

International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

P rere qu isites: POS I !3orCJ loo, or consent of instructoi 

investigation of the political, legal and sociologica] aspects of Internationa] 

terrorism fopics to be examined include the relationships of international terrorism, 

international relations, and principles of international law, the nature of the anti- 

terrori sl re s ponse, and the implications of Internationa] terrorism tor the future 

(Identical with ( I 426 I 

American Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 11 3 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of U.S. foreign policy and factors, both domestic and foreign, contributing 

to its formulation. 

Independent Study In Political Theory (V-V-U-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 
Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in si me 
field of political theory under the supervision of a member of the staff. Emphasis 
will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports and essays. 
Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science and at 
least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department bv mid- 
quarter preceding the quarter independent stud v is contemplated 
Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

Independent Study In Comparative Government (V-V-d-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 

Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval oi a department.il 

committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in some 

field of comparative government under the supervision of a member oi the staff. 

Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports 

and essays. Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science 

and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department by 

mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permission oi the school dean at Armstrong and 

the college from which the student comes. 

Comparative Economic Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic systems 

developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of government and politics will 

be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 

men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 

(Identical with ECO 445.) 



124 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 447 



PA/POS 452 

7453/454 



Comparative Judicial Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 305 or CJ / POS 360 or POS 41 5 or consent of instructor. 

Designed to focus on the law enforcement and judicial procedure aspects of the Japanese, 

French, West German, and Soviet political systems. (Identical with CJ 447.) 

Internship (V-V-5) 

Offered each quarter under each heading. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and 
permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply academic 
training in the practical governmental setting. Settings will include law enforcement 
agencies (local, state, or federal), community treatment facilities, courts, congres- 
sional offices, and various governmental agencies. This course will be jointly 
supervised by departmental instructors and agency officials. Open to transient 
students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. (Identical with CJ 452-453-454.) 



* Gross, Jimmie 
Lanier, Osmos 
Patterson, Robert 

* Pruden, George 

* Stone, Janet 
Waters, Thomas 

* Yentsch, Anne 



History 

Faculty 

* Warlick, Roger, Department Head 

* Arens, Olavi, Graduate Coordinator 

* Brown, Sarah 
Burianek, Otto 
Burnett, Robert 
Comaskey, Bernard 

* Duncan, John 
Fertig, Barbara 

* Finlay, Mark 

* Graduate Faculty 
The History Major 

The major in history may take either of two forms: History per se or History with 
T-4 Certification. 

Students who major in history should expect to enroll in a foreign language 
sequence during their Sophomore year, certainly not later than their Junior year. 
Therefore, students should plan their programs of study with careful consultation 
with a Faculty Advisor. Students who change majors, or who transfer, may find it 
necessary to enroll beyond the traditional 12 quarters, if the degree requirements 
including the foreign language cannot be fulfilled within that time. 

Students enrolled in the evening program should not expect to be exempted from 
the foreign language requirement, unless for a three year period prior to graduation 
no available foreign language sequence is offered in the evening. 

In addition to meeting minimum requirements for either program, students 
contemplating graduate work in history are strongly advised to continue their 
linguistic study beyond the language sequence 103 level. Students with a double major, 
where Computer Science is a language choice, may substitute Computer Science for the 
foreign language requirement in history. 

Advanced coursework in History for either form of the major requires HIS 450 and HIS 
496 or 497. In selecting the remainder of their advanced courses students may choose to 
concentrate in one particular area of History (e.g. European or American), providing they 
diversity to the extent of completing at least ten hours outside that area. 

The B. A. History major is offered both day and evening hours on the ASC campus, and 
in the evening at the Brunswick Center — except for HIS 450 and 496 or 497. These two 



HISTORY 125 



requirement! must be completed on i ampin I in- B ( . S artth .1 1 Ustor) i on entration if 
full) svailable *»t both locations 

Honors In History 

See His 4^ s-mor i in-sis in History for detailed Information 

Scholarships In History. 

I imited Bcholarship aid la svailable annually Interested itudents are invi ted to 
Inquire in the department office tor details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 4 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 1 5 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220 or 290 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 121, 122; PHY 121, 122; 
PHS121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115, POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201; SOC 201; PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 15 

2. History 251, 252 10 

3. Related course 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. HIS 450 and 496 or 497 10 

2. History courses 300 level or above with at least 10 hours 

outside the area of concentration 30 

The concentration areas are: 

A. U.S. Historv— HIS 351, 352, 354, 355, 357, 361, 363, 371, 374, 375, 376, 
377, 379, 400, 421, 425, 451, 455, 456, 459, 462, 463, 465, 485, 486, 496 

B. European History— HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 
348, 350, 410, 41 1, 445, 447, 464, 483, 484, 497 

C Russian-Asian-African-Latin American History — HIS 310, 311, 312, 
320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481, 482 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

To be chosen from such fields as anthropology, economics, 

literature, sociology, statistics at least 10 hours of which must 

be at 300-level or above. 

See Department for exhaustive list 20 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



126 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 15 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201. SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major and Supporting Fields 60 

1. HIS 450 and 496 or 497 10 

2. U.S. History 

A. HIS 371 or 377 (dependent on HIS 251, 252 selection) 5 

B. One or two courses from: 

HIS 351, 352, 354, 355, 357, 361, 363, 374, 375, 376, 379, 400, 

421, 425, 451, 455, 456, 459, 462, 463, 465, 485, 486, 496 5-10 

3. European History 

Two or three courses from: 

HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 

348, 350, 410, 411, 445, 447, 464, 483, 484, 497 10-15 

4. Russian-Asian-African-Latin American History 
Two courses from: 

HIS 310, 311, 312, 320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481, 482 10 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the following areas: 

A. Approved 300-400 level POS electives 

B. ECO 201 and approved 300+ elective 

C Approved electives in behavioral sciences (SOC, ANT, PSY) 
D. GEO 211, 212 and approved GEO elective 
C Professional sequence 40 

1. EDN 200, EXC 310, EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



HISTORY 127 



Minor Concentrations 

I tie Department o( I Ustor) often ■ rtumbei o( minor concentrations 

\ minor in i Ustor) has great pnn ttcaJ value its notation on tin- bran* ript Indfc 
to .ui employer that tin- ipplicant has some solid liberal arts background with its 

impanying insight into the development ind functioning of modern lociety, tnd 
mat the applicant has made an extra effort to refine research and writing skills so eseenri ■! 
to dealing with that lodety Whatever the major one choos es, puch i rumor will 
strengthen the student's academic record. 

Students who hope to work in history-related Melds upon graduation should 
consider adding a minor In Preservation Studies, or In Historical Archaeol 
Through this pro gra m unique opportunities are provided tor qualified students to 
gam practical experience while making a realistic assessment of the possibilities 
ottered by their field ot interest. Cooperative arrangements with Historic Savannah 

Foundation, Georgia Historical Societv, Savannah Landmark Project, Oatland Island 
Center, and with a number of museums and historical sites, such as Telfair Academe, 
Ft. Pulaski, fuliette Low Center, Wormsloe Plantation, and Ft. King George, permit 
placement of students in positions relating to: 

(a) archival and manuscript curation, (b) historic site administration and interpre- 
tation, (c) museum studies, (d) historic preservation, and (e) historical archaeologv 

Additional minor concentrations are offered jointly with the Department of 
Government in International Studies and Russian Studies. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or better in each course, require the following: 

Hours 

History 20 

1. Twenty hours of 300 level HIS courses 20 

Historical Archaeologv 25 

1. PBH/ANT401,402and455 

2. Ten hours from the following: HIS 341, 359, 361, 371 and 450 
International Studies 25 

(assumes competencv in one modern foreign language through the 103 level*) 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 346, 348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 429; HIS 321, 330, 350, 355, 435 10 

Preservation Studies 25 

1. HIS 450 5 

2. PBH 420, 425 and 421 or 455 15 

3. PBH 498 5 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion of RUS 101-103*) 5 

2. POS 349 5 

3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481; POS 440 10 

Geography Courses 

GEO 211 Physical Geography (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Course will include such topics as earth-sun relationships, cartography, weather, 
climate and climate classification, soils, bio-geography, vegetation and landforms. 
Emphasis will be on global patterns of distribution. 

GEO 212 Cultural Geography (5-5) 

Spring. 

Course will include such topics as the concept of culture, population settlement, 
patterns, technological origins and diffusions, types of economics and the relation- 
ship of man to his environment. Emphasis will be given to the process of cultural 
change through time in place. 



1 28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GEO 302 Introduction to Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 plus 10 hours of a lab science. 

An introduction to physical geology. A study of common earth materials, dynamic 
processes of change, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure and 
evolution of the earth's crust and inner regions. (Identical with GEL 301). 

GEO 303 Introduction to Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 plus 10 hours of a lab science. 

An introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and to the physical 

laws that describe atmospheric phenomena. (Identical with MET 301). 

GEO 310 Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 or 21 2 plus 75 quarter hours credit in college courses. 
Considerations of the interactions between humans and the support systems of the 
earth which are essential to their existence (identical with BIO 310.) 

History Courses 

Advanced courses in History are generally open to all students who have com- 
pleted the appropriate survey. Specifically, the Department considers background 
equivalent to HIS 114 and HIS 115, or permission of the instructor, to be the prerequisite 
for all advanced courses on European, Russian, Asian, African, and Latin American 
topics. For advanced courses in American history, the equivalent of HIS 251 or. HIS 
252, or permission of the instructor, is considered prerequisite. Exceptions are noted 
on specific courses. 

General 

HIS 114 Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for college credit English, i.e. English 
101 or above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity 
from the time of the ancient Middle-Eastern civilizations to 1648. Throughout the 
course the major civilized traditions are considered and comparative methods used 
to facilitate interpretations of them. 

HIS 115 Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for college credit English, i.e. English 
101 or above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity 
from 1648 to the present. Throughout the course the major civilized traditions are 
considered and comparative methods used to facilitate interpretations of them. A 
continuation of HIS 114. 

HIS 295 Internship (V-V-[l-5]) Offered on application. 

Prerequisites: At least 15 hours of History courses with a History GPA of 2.5 and 
sophomore status. Application and credit arrangements must be made through the 
Department in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the internship. Transient 
students must also have permission from the Dean of Faculty and college from which 
the student comes. 

An individually designed course involving off -campus study and research or work 
in an appropriate public agency or private business. Assignments are normally 
designed to required the full quarter for completion, during which time the student 
will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring organization and his/her 
academic instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Internships at this level are graded on an S/U basis and will be credited only among 
electives. 



HISTORY 129 



His iw Pltldwoik in History (V-V-I1-5D 
Summa 1993 

t. tffered only by ipei lal arrangemenl with the Depaitinent, made in advance this 
course is designed t.> provide credit tor Held hip based courses 01 extendi 
\Mis w nether abroad or in the I s Research reading and written assignment! 
n ill be tailored to the spei ifU nature oi ea< i» »tud) tout or site visitation (Sj 
area of itud) will be nuiu.it i- J on tin- transcript > I lu- course ma) be n 
credit as topics vary but no more than five noun may in- count! the 40 

hours required foi i major in History 

HIS 450 Historical Method (3-4-5) 

Pall and Spring (evening) Reouired of all 1 listory majors and ot Preservation Studies 

minors 

An introduction to tin- nature and method ol historical resean h, treating problems 
of investigation organization, *nd writing through dis< ussion and u tual r< 
experience in local historj 

HIS 495 Professional Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Open to transient students only with permission ot the I lean ot Pa< ultv at Armstrong 

and the college from which the student comes Prerequisites 3.0 in all history Courses; 

20 hours of upper level history including HIS 450. 

Application and credit arrangements must be made through the department in 

advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project in vol vingott -campus 

study and research in a government or private agency. P roj ect s are normally designed 

to require the full eleven week quarter for completion, during which time the student 

willbeunder the joint supervision of thesponsoringagency and his faculty *d\ isor 

May be repeated for credit. 

This internship, graded on an S or U basis, will be credited among related studies, 

not as a part of the minimum 40 hours of traditional work required for the major 

HIS 499 Senior Thesis In History (0-6-3). 

Offered on application. Prerequisites: Senior status; 25 hours of upper division 
History courses, including HIS 450; a 3.5 GPA on all History cou i - 
A directed research course under the supervision of a permanent member oi the 
Department of History- The student must file an application with the Academic 
Affairs Committee of the History Department by mid-term of the quarter ( excluding 
summer) before the student wishes to enroll tor thecourse. The completed thesis must 
be submitted three weeks prior to the end of the quarter. If the faculty oi the 
department approve the completed thesis for honors, the degree designation on the 
student's transcript will be noted "Honors in History." Consult the Department Office 
for important details. 

United States History Courses 

HIS 251 American History to 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States to end 

of the Civil War. 

HIS 252 American Since 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from 1 865 

to the present. 

HIS 351 Popular Culture In the United States to 1914 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

An examination of the major trends in the news media, popular literature, entertain- 
ment, and recreational activities to 1914. 

HIS 352 Popular Culture In the United States Since 1914 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995 (evening). 

An examination of the major trends in news media, popular literature, entertainment, 

and recreational activities since 1914. 



1 30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 354 Studies In American Diplomacy to WW I (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from colonial times to 

World War 1. 

HIS 355 Studies In American Diplomacy since WW I (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1 995Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from World 
War I to the present. 

HIS 357 American Military History (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

A study of the history of warfare and military technique in their social, economic, 

and political contexts, with special emphasis on the American military tradition. 

HIS 361 The Old South (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1994 

Economic, cultural, and political history of the antebellum South with emphasis on 

those factors that made the South a unique section of the nation. 

HIS 363 Economic History of the United States (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1994. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

This course surveys the growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period 
since 1 860. Developments in agriculture, industry, labor, transportation, and finance 
will be studied and analyzed. 

HIS 371 Colonial and Revolutionary America (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1994. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement and growth of the 
English colonies of North America; triumph over France in the New World, the 
drastic change in British colonial policy and the rise of American opposition to it, 
the achievement of independence, and the establishment of the United States under 
the Constitution. 

HIS 374 Women In American History (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

Women in American History: An examination of the changing political, social, and 
economic roles of the American woman from colonial times to the present. Emphasis 
will be given to the pre-Civil War feminist reform movements, woman's broader 
social and economic role after the war, her awakening awareness of the need for 
political power, and the mid-20th century revolution. 

HIS 375 Civil War and Reconstruction (5-0-5) 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with minor consideration of 
the military campaign; political, economic and social aspects of reconstruction. 

HIS 376 Victorian America (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

Presentation of the major subjects of the late 19th century, including the emergence 
of a national economy, its theory and policies; partisan and reform politics; the moral 
and Constitutional dimensions of Reconstruction; American society and social thought; 
and territorial aggrandisement. 

HIS 377 Recent America (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

An analysis of the institutions and forces which molded American life from the late 
19th century (1890) through World War II, including political, economic, social and 
intellectual issues. 

HIS 379 Contemporary America (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994 (evening). 

An examination of the society of the United States since World War II, with special 

emphasis given to the major social and cultural trends. 

HIS 400 Seminar In American History (5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admission. 

Designed to permit a group of advanced students to pursue intensive research ona 

special topic in the field to be defined by the instructor. 



HISTORY 131 



H1S421 fUchittctuial History (4-2-5) 

Pal] 1994 

% study of various stylet ol American architecture Georgian Federal \< 

1 1 le< 1 1 v ism and modem slides from I listorii \men< an Building Surve) landscape 

architecture Visiting ipeakersand field trips will be used (Identical with PBI 

HIS 425 American Vernacular Architecture (4-2-S) 

9pring 1994 P rere q uisite PBH 421 or permission of instructoi 

■\n InterdisdpUnar) study ol the historic buill environment with emphatii osi 

tr.Klitu>n.»l and popular archite* hire Recording technique 

theoretical approaV net, past snd present willbeexamined I Mso listed asPBl 

HIS 451 Reform Movements In American History (5-0-5) 

Winter 1995 
\ study of the reform movements in America since the Revolution 

HIS 456 History of Savannah and Georgia (5-0-5) 

Fall. 1993 

Begins ivith a history of Indians, emphasis on the founding of the colon) stSe% snnali 
and on the colonial. Revolutionary! antebellum snd Post-4 ivil War periods 
Political, economic . so< ial. religious and artistic trends are disc timed snd placed in 
context of Georgia and U.S. history. 
The course will involve considerable research in pnmarv SOUrCCS available locally 

HIS 459 American Material Culture (4-2-5) 

Winter, 1994 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains ol OUT SOCiet) past and 
present Vernacular and politearchitecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community and 
settlement patterns, dress, diet, and diseases are among the topics that will be 
discussed. (Identical with PBH 459 and ANT 459). 

HIS 462 Americans Called Indians (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201. 

An investigation of the aboriginal cultures of North American from the Arctic to the 
Rio Grande. Study will include origins, distribution, ecology and interrelationships, 
past through present. (Identical with ANT 305.) 

HIS 463 Folklife (3-4-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

A survey of the creation and persistance of tradition in societies .ind of the process 
of change, as demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration. 
festival belief, and material culture. Emphasis will be given to understanding the 
multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 

HIS 465 Technology and Culture II: 1900 to the Present (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1995 (evening) 

An examination of developments in the history of technology in the twentieth 
century. The course defines technology broadly, rather than stressing specific 
machines; and emphasizes the relationships among American technology, society 
and culture. 

HIS 485/486 Independent Study In United States History (V-V-d-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 450 and at least 15 additional hours in 
upper division History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0), an overall GF A of2J) 

(after completion of 120 hours), and an approved application. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty of Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty. An application 
must be filed with the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding 
the independent study. A full description of the requirements and an application may 
be obtained in the departmental office. 



132 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 496 American Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1994 (evening). 

See major program outlines, part B.l, for the historiography requirement. 

A study of the writing of American history from colonial times to the present with 

emphasis on the historical philosophies and interpretations of the major schools of 

thoughts as well as individual historians. Recommended especially to students 

contemplating graduate work in History. 

HIS 554 Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. Prerequisite: PBH 207, or permission of the instructor. 
An introduction to the archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans 
in the New World. Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post 
medieval Archaeology as well as to the special areas of Industrial and Nautical 
Archaeology- Emphasis will be given to anthropological archeology's method and 
theory both as perspective for the writing of history and as a component of Historic 
Preservation. (Identical with PBH 455.) 

European History Courses 

HIS 333 Modern Germany, 1789-1933 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

A study of Germany from the pluralism of the Holy Roman Empire through the 
German confederation to the unified Reich. Attention will be given to the political, 
social, and cultural developments in Austria, Prussia, and the "Third Germany." 

HIS 336 Modern East Central Europe (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1993. 

A survey of the history of the nations between Germany and Russia in the 19th and 
20th centuries. Topics to be covered include the rise of nationalism, the gaining of 
independence, problems in establishing democracy, experience during World War II, 
and the establishment of communist control 

HIS 340 English History, 1485-1660 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1993 (evening). 

An analysis of political, constitutional, economic, and religious issues under the 

Tudors and early Stuarts, including the English Civil War. 

HIS 341 English History, 1660-1815 (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

An investigation of the Restoration monarchies, the constitutional revolution of 1 688, 
the rise of ministerial responsibility in the early 18th century, the American colonial 
revolt, and England's relationship to the French Revolution. 

HIS 342 Ancient History (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

A study of the early civilizations of the Middle East, the Greek city states, the 
Roman republic and empire, with special emphasis on the social, political and 
cultural contributions of these ancient peoples. 

HIS 343 Early Middle Ages, A D. 333-c.lOOO (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Carolingian 
period with special emphasis on the institutional developments which led to the 
emergence of stable kingdoms out of the chaos of the barbarian invasions. 

HIS 344 The High Middle Ages, C.1000 to c.1300 (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1995. 

The history of Europe from c. 1000 to 1300 with emphasis on the struggle between 
church and state, the Crusade movement, and the 12th century intellectual renais- 
sance, all of which profoundly influenced the development of the various medieval 
kingdoms. 

HIS 345 The Late Middle Ages and Renaissance (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1995. 

The history of Europe from c. 1 300 to 1 51 7 with emphasis on the political, cultural, and 
intellectual developments which transformed medieval and Renaissance society. 



HISTORY 133 



nis ^4b Reformation i r.» (5-0-9) 

Wmtri 

\ stud) ft the controversial era emphasizing its majoi iatues and movement 
their de v e l opment through the Thirt) Years Wai Political social and economic 

as wt'll .in religious taceta ol the upheaval will I 

HIS347 Europe ta the E igh tee n th Cental (5-0-5) 

[•all 1994 

rhis course coi em tin- period from die reign of Louis XIV to th<- French Revol 

considering tin- major political soda! and Intellectual trends on the( ontinent 

Particular emphasis is pla< ed on Pram e 
Mis M8 Europe In the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5) 

Winter 1994 

A study oi tin- most I mport a nt social^ politu si, and Intellectual directions of Eui 

history From die Congress ol V lenns to thf end ol the ninet e e n th ». entury 
HIS 350 Europe In the Twentieth Century (5-0-5) 

Spring, w g 4 (evening). 

\ studs oi the major developments in Europe since WOO. 

HIS 410 Seminar In European History (5-0-5) 

Permission ol Instructor required foradmisskm. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in European history In examination oi 
primary materials 
HIS 411 Seminar on the Crusades (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1994 

An examination of the 12th and 13th century Crusade movement through the Study 
oi the available primary source material. 

HIS 445 Seminar In Medieval History (5-0-5) 

A treatment of selected topics in medieval history working from primary source 

materials. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HIS 447 The French Revolution and Napoleon (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1995. 

This course examines the background and events of the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon. Different interpretations are considered. 

HIS 464 Technology and Culture I: The Industrial Revolution to 1900 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

An examination of developments in the history of technology from 17(H) to WOO The 

course defines technology broadly, rather than stressing specific machines, and 

emphasizes relationships among European and American technology, society 

cultures. 

HIS 483/484 Independent Study In European History (V-V-(l-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 450 and at least 15 additional hours in 
upper division History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0). an overall GPAof2 5 
(after completion of 120 hours), and an approved application. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty An application 
must be filed with the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding 
the independent studv. A full description of the requirements and an application may 
be obtained in the departmental office. 

HIS 497 European Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995 (evening). See major program outlines, part 8.1, for the historiography 

requirement. 

A study of the writers of history in the Western cultural tradition, with an emphasis 

on the historical philosophies, interpretations, and problems raised by the major 

modern European historians. Recommended especially to students contemplating 

graduate work in History. 



1 34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Russian, Asian, African and Latin American History Courses 

HIS 310 Latin America (5-0-5) 

An introductory course in Latin-American history with consideration given to 
institutions of the areas as well as events and personalities. 

HIS 311 The Caribbean (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1993. 

A study of the historical development of the Caribbean from European conquest and 
colonization to twentieth-century nationalism. Emphasis will be given to understand 
present-day Caribbean Cultures. (Also listed as ANT 561.) 

HIS 312 History of Africa (5-0-5) 

A survey of African civilizations from ancient times, with major emphasis on 
development of the continent since 1 800. 

HIS 320 Traditional China (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

The history of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the early nineteenth 

century, with emphasis on its characteristic political, social, economic, and cultural 

developments. 

HIS 321 Modern China (5-5) 

Spring, 1995 (evening). 

The history of China from the nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on 

political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. 

HIS 322 History of Japan (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1993. 

A survey of the history of Japan from the earliest times to the present, with primary 

emphasis on its emergence as a world power since the late nineteenth century. 

HIS 323 History of the Middle East (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

A survey of Middle Eastern history from Muhammad to the present, and of Islamic 
culture and civilization. Emphasis will be placed on the background of current issues 
and conflicts in the region. 

HIS 329 Medieval Russia (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1993. (evening). 

A survey of the economic, social, and political development of the Russian state from 
its foundation in the 9th century through its modernization by Peter the Great in the 
early 18th century. 

HIS 330 Modem Russia (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994 (evening). 

A survey of Russian history from Peter the Great to the present. The major political, 
cultural, economic, and social developments of Russia in both the Imperial and Soviet 
periods will be covered. 

HIS 428 Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

A detailed study of the impact of Western influence on the Muscovite state in the 

sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

HIS 431 The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes for the collapse 

of Tsarism, the Boishevik Revolution, and victory in the Russian Civil War. 

HIS 435 History of Soviet Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

This course reviews historically the development of soviet foreign policy toward 
Western European states, notably Germany, and also with the non-European world 
through 1917-1940, World War II, and cold War phases. Special attention will be 
given in this last phase to U.S. -Soviet rivalry. Soviet relations with other 
communist states in Eastern Europe, China, and the Third World, and to the recent 
moves toward detente. 



HISTORY 135 



HIS 481/492 Independent Stud\ In Russian \sian V trie an/Latin \m.ru.m 
Histon i\ Yd-sn. 

\\ sllablc ea< h quartei Prerequieitef HIS 450 and at least 15 additional houra In 
upper division History ^ ouraes (with a minimum GPA< I 
i. hut completion ol 120 hours), ind in approved ipplicatlon Open I 
ttudtntaonly with thepermissionoJ the Dean of Faculty ai Armstrong and th« 
from whu h the itudenl ». omct 

Designed topermltsuperiorstudentstopursueindividua] resean hand reading in the 
t. hoaen field under thesupervisionol s member of the History (acuity Anappl 
nuist be Hied with the department in sdvaiu e, normall) by mid quartei pro eding 
the independent study. A full dew riptionol the requi r eme n ts and an application ma) 
be obtained in the departmental office 

Public History Courses 

PBH 207 Introduction to Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall 1994. 

I he introductory archaeology course consists ol a history ol the field, basu 
techniques, theoretical underpinnings, and examples ol field work from .ill tyj 

exca> stion. It covers the range from early man to industrial and urban an neology 
in a general fashion Analysis is introduced along with survey u\ hniques, | 

vation reporting and other skills. (Identical with AN II 207 | 

PBH 295 Internship (V-V-[l-5l) 

Ottered on application. Prerequisites: At least 15 hours ot History COUrSCS with a 

I [istoryGPAol 2.5 and sophomore status. Application and credit arrangements must 

be made through the Department in advance, normally by mid -quarter preceding the 

internship. Transient students must also have permission from the I ^iwn ol Faculty 

and college from which the student comes. 

An individually designed course involving off-campUS Study and research or work 

in an appropriate public agency or private business Assignments are normally 

designed to required the full quarter for completion, during which time the student 

will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring organization and his her 

academic instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Internships at this level are graded on an S/U basis and will be credited only among 

electives. 

PBH 401 Fieldwork In Historical Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of instructor or director. 
An introduction to and first application of archaeological methods to a specific field 
project. Excavation techniques, surveying and map making, data collecting and 
recording, archaeological photography, the identification and analysis ot art tacts, 
and the interpretation or archaeological data will be presented in field and labora- 
tory work as well as in lectures and readings. (Identical with AN I 401 > (Under 
certain circumstances this course may be substituted in the Preservation Studies 
minor for PBH 498). Course may be repeated for credit 

PBH 402 Practicum In Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

The application of archaeological interpretative techniques to a specific site or 
analytical problem. Individual research p r ojects in the interpretation ot archaeo- 
logical data and the conservation of artifactual finds with special attention to the 
care and storage of collections, display in the museum setting, and the presentation 
of archaeologically-derived information. (Identical with \\ I 4 8). (Under certain 
circumstances this course mav be substituted in the Museum Studies minor for PBH 
495). 

PBH 420 Historic Preservation (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1994 (evening). 

Students may find HIS 450 to be useful preparation for this cours 

An examination of the field including values, principles, practices, development of 

planning and organization for preservation; preservation law, economics and politics. 



1 36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PBH 421 American Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1994. (evening) 

A study of various styles of American architecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, 

Eclecticism and modern; slides from Historic American 

Building Survey; landscape architecture. Visiting speakers and field trips will be 

used. 

PBH 425 American Vernacular Architecture (4-2-5) 

Spring 1994. Prerequisite: HIS/ PBH 421 or permission of instructor. 

An interdisciplinary study of the historic built environment with emphasis on 

traditional and popular architecture. Recording techniques, research strategies, 

and theoretical approaches, past and present, will be examined. (Also listed as HIS 

425.) 

PBH 455 Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of the instructor. 
An introduction to the archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans 
in the New World. Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post 
Medieval Archaeology as well as to the special areas of Industrial and Nautical 
Archaeology. Emphasis will be given to archaeological archaeology's method and 
theory both as a perspective for the writing of history and as a component of 
Historic Preservation. (Identical with HIS 455). 

PBH 459 American Material Culture (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1993. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains of our society, past and 
present. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community 
and settlement patterns, dress, diet, and disease are among the topics that will be 
discussed. (Identical to HIS 459 and ANT 459). 

PBH 460 Archival Studies (4-2-5) 

Summer, 1993. 

Prerequisite: HIS 450 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the archivist as a professional and to the role of archives in 
society. A survey of documentary materials and of principals and practices in- 
volved in their acquisition, cataloging, care, and retrieval in public and private 
facilities will also be included. 

PBH 462 Museum Studies (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

A survey of the development of museums in the United States and of the ethics and 
practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, planning, 
outreach, and public education. 

PBH 463 Folklife (3-4-5) 

A survey of the creation and persistence of tradition in societies and of the process 
of change, as demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, ; 
festival belief, and material culture. Emphasis will be given to understanding the 
multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 

PBH 480 Special Topics In Archaeology (V-V-[l -5]) 

Prerequisites: ANT/PBH 207, ANT/PBH 401 

The course is designed to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in archaeological techniques. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
archaeological graphics, faunal analysis (zooarchaeology), conservation, or involve 
some off-campus archaeological experience. 

PBH 481 Special Topics In Historic Preservation (V-V-[l-5]) 

Prerequisites: PBH 420 

The course is designed to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in historic preservation. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
preservation philosophy, rural preservation, urban planning or involve some off- 
campus activity. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 137 



PBH499 Internship In Museum Stadia O \ F) 

Prerequisites I'HM 160 and 162 with I 1 or better in each coui 
rhe Mudenl will pursue an individual!) designed >.■ I involving oH 

campus stud) tnd reseen h in a government or private agency involved in museum 
work Projects are normall) designed to require tin- full eleven week quart 
completion during whit h time the student will be under the joint supervision of the 
iponsoring ageiM \ and his fa< ulty sponsor 
PBH 4^S Internship In Preservation Stadief (V-\ -5) 

Prerequisites PBH 420 and 421 01 125 with a ( or better in sscfa course 
l in- student will pursue an individual]) designed course p roj ect involving off 
campus study and research in an appropriate preservation agency Projects are 
normally designed to require tin- tull eleven week iju.irtrr for co mpl etion during 
which rime the student will be under the Joint supervision »>t the s ponsor i ng a] 
and his faculty sponsor 

Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

Faculty 

Vacant Department Head 

1 Andrews Carol Martin, William 

* Brown, Hugh \oble, David 
Clancy, Frank Nordquist, Richard 

* Cooksey, Thomas * Raymond, Richard 
Cottrell, Isabel * Roth, Lorie 
Daassa, Dali Smith, James 
Fodor, Ciarv * Strozier, Robert 
Hollinger, Karen Weingarten, Barry 
Jenkins, Marvin Welsh, John 

* Graduate Faculty 
English Composition 

Entering students should begin the required English core sequence in their initial 
quarter of attendance. Students must not delay beginning this sequence beyond their 
second quarter of attendance. Students must enroll in the appropriate course in the core 
sequence and do so each quarter until they complete the sequence and /or pass the 
Regents' Test. ENG 101, 102, and 201 courses may not be dropped without permission of 
the. Department Head. Students who do drop these courses without Department Head 
approval will receive a failing grade in the class. 

Exemptions from Core English 

Students who wish credit exemption for English 101 must take the CLEP College 
C omposition and Essay examination and make a score of 53 (Grade equivalent ot a "B") 
and make a "C" or above in English 102. Students who wish a credit exemption tor 
English 102 must take the CLEP Analysis and Interpretation of Literature and Es&a) 
Examination and make a score of 55 (Grade equivalent of "B") and make a "C" or above 
in English 201 . Students who make these scores in English 101 and 102 exams must make 
a "C" or above in English 201 to receive credit exemption for tho^e courses. 

Students w r ho score "3" or above on the AP exam also will receive credit exemption for 
English 101, providing that they make "C" or better in English 102. 

English Composition Transfer Credit 

Transfer students from outside the University System of Georgia who have not vet 
completed the required English courses prescribed by Armstrong degree programs 
should visit the Director of Composition (Gamble 102-C) for a placement interview. At 
this interview, the Director of Composition will evaluate student transcripts for English 
credits, administer the English Placement Test (if necessary), provide information on the 



138 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

composition sequence and the Georgia Regents' Test, and determine placement in the 
appropriate composition course. Interview schedules are available in the Office of the 
Registrar and in the Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Foreign Languages 

Students who, while enrolled at Armstrong State College, take their foreign language 
courses on another campus must pass an appropriate national standardized test with a 
score not lower than the 60 percentile on each part to receive credit for 103 and /or 201. 
Students transferring to Armstrong State College, after having completed the required 
foreign language sequence at another college, with "C's" or above, are not required to 
complete the proficiency examinations at Armstrong. 

Exemptions from Foreign Languages 

Students who wish a credit exemption for the French or Spanish requirement must 
make a score of 45 (Grade equivalent of a "B" ) on the CLEP exam, and make a "C" or better 
in the appropriate 201 class. Students who wish a credit exemption for German must 
make a score of 44 (Grade equivalent of a "B") and make a "C" or higher in German 201 . 
For further information students should contact the Head of the Department of Lan- 
guages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts, or Ms. Benson in Counseling and Placement. 

Students majoring in English or in Drama-Speech should satisfy the college core 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree during the freshman and sophomore years. 
Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in each 300 or 400 level course included in any 
major or minor area. 

CPC Requirement 

The CPC deficiency in foreign languages may be fulfilled by successfully completing 
any of the 1 00-level courses in Spanish, French, Latin, or German with a final course grade 
of C or better. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Two from MAT 101, 103, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. Two from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 227, 228; 

MUS 200; PHI 201; CS 115 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Courses in the Major Field 50 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. ENG 311 and 312 10 

3. ENG 315 and 316 10 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS Ml 



I Onetroon I NG HI M ' I » 1,4 16 or457 S 

6 One from BNG 163 152,453 5 

One from I NG 136 i ; ' i ;s 
B One from English 171 n iv 1 

c Related Field Requirement! 25 

Phre courses numbered NX) oi above In tiu> School ol Arts ft s v lencei or 

me D i vi si on ol Education 2^ 

D Blactivea 15 

i- Regents and Bxil Examinations o 

rOTAl 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A 
MAJOR IN ENGLISH (WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III ' 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. DRS 228 or 341 5 

3. One from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. ENG 311 and 312 10 

3. ENG 313 or 314 5 

4. ENG 315 or 316 5 

5. ENG 445 or 446 5 

6. ENG 470 5 

7. ENG 480 or 482 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

1. DRS/FLM 350 or 351 5 

2. Approved electives 10 

D. Professional Sequence 45 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 428 or 445, 439, 471, 472, 473 40 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 201 



140 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN DRAMA-SPEECH 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. DRS227, 228 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. DRS341 5 

3. DRS342 5 

4. DRS445 5 

5. DRS446 5 

6. Choice of DRS 340; 349; 350; 351 10 

7. Choice of DRS 400; ENG 500, 501, or 502 5 

8. Two from: DRS 450, 451, 452 10 

C. Courses in Related Field 30 

1 . ENG 345 or 346, 360, 365, 456, 457 20 

2. One from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

3. One from LIN 480, 482 5 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _ 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH (Communications) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Two from: 

MAT 101, 103, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS Ml 



i l\ 

! 1 oreign language lequence through 201 

ind one from MCI I " in 

i \ 6 

1 PI 103 or 108 and 117 3 

rhrec activity courses 

State Requiremenl 5 

HIS 251 oi 252 5 

B », ounce in tlu- Major Field I 

I. BNG HI or M2 

2 I NG M3oi 114 

3. BNG H5oi 116 5 

4 rhree from ENG 371, J72, 470, [RN 343 15 

5 I hree rrom F\t ! 473, 480, 482, JRN 400, FLM 401 1 5 

C Related Field Requirements 

l. [Wo rrom DRS 228, 341, 349 10 

: [Wo rrom ART 204, ENG 500, 501, 502, ENG 499, DRS 400 10 

I One from FLM 340, 350, 351 5 

D. Blectives 20 

1. Electives 20 

& Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations available from the Department of Languages, 
Literature, and Dramatic Arts. For completion of each of the minors, the student must 
earn a "C" or better in each course offered for the minor. 
The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 
Communications 20 

1 . Two from ENG 370, 371, 372, JRN 343 10 

2. Two from ENG 373, 480, 482, JRN 400, FLM 401 10 

English 20 

English electives numbered 300 or above (only 5 hours of 499) 20 

Film 20 

1. DRS/FLM 340, 351 10 

2. DRS/FLM 350, DRS/FLM 401 10 

Foreign Language 20 

Language electives numbered 300 or above 20 

Linguistics 20 

Courses selected from ENG/LIN 325, 380, 382; LIN 400 20 

Philosophy 20 

Philosophy electives numbered 300 or above 20 

Drama-Speech Offerings 

Successful completion of ENG 101 is prerequisite to all DRS courses with the exception 
of DRS 227. 

DRS 227 Theatre laboratory (0-3-1) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student will work on the Masquers' production 

of the quarter. Only one hour of credit mav be earned per quarter. The maximum 

total credit allowed in Theatre Laboratory is five quarter hours. 

In the summer students may take up to five hours credit in DRS 227 by working part 

time in summer theatre workshop (DRS 450). 



142 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DRS 228 Speech Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practice and theory of interpersonal communication and public speaking. Students 
develop skills through practice of the individual parts of speech, working in small 
groups, and through the performance of vocal exercises and oral readings. Each 
student prepares and delivers several major speeches, including extemporaneous 
and impromptu ones. 

DRS/FLM 340 Development of the Cinema (5-0-5) 

Same as FLM 340. 

A study of the history and development of the cinema with special emphasis on the 

American dominance of the medium. 

DRS 341 Oral Interpretation (5-0-5) 

The oral interpretation of poetry and prose. The techniques of literary analysis and 
the vocal techniques needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning are 
stressed. 

DRS 342 Dynamics of Performing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ENG 101 plus at least two credit hours in DRS 227. 
Intensive study of characterization and styles of acting from several points; 
historical, critical, practical, theoretical, and experimental. Emphasis on develop- 
ment of performance skills. 

DRS 345 History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginning to the present day emphasizing the 
development of the physical theatre. 

DRS 346 Play Production (5-0-5) 

The theory and practice of acting and directing with special attention to image- 
making on stage. Individuals under supervision prepare and execute the production 
of scenes and short plays. 

DRS/FLM 349 Television Theory and Criticism (5-0-5) 

A study of television theory and criticism with special emphasis on television as a 
media form. Topics include: television spectatorship, genres, production, and 
scholarship. 

DRS/FLM 

/JRN 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM 350 and JRN 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

DRS/FLM 351 Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Same as FLM 351. 

Studies in the translation of literature to film with emphasis on the differences of 

the media in form, content and perception. 

DRS/FLM 373 Rhetoric (5-0-5) 

See ENG /DRS 373 for course description. 

DRS 400 Special Topics In Communications (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

The special subject matter in this course is announced when the course is offered. 

DRS/FLM 401 Topics In Film (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Film 350 or 351. 

The special subject matter of this course will be announced when the course is offered. 

Topics include: Film Genres, Auteurs, and Critical Theory. 

DRS 450/451 

/452 Drama Workshop (0-15-5) 

Summer only. 

Summer stock theatre for credit. Students are directed and instructed by a member 

of the faculty who is a professional in the theatre. All aspects of production will be 

studied. 






LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS M3 



Independent Stud) (1-5MH1-5) 

( Offered on demand Prerequisites Senior status plus I \( , lui plus.it 1. 

DRScourte Open to transient students oni) with the permission ol i ulty 

il Armstrong snd the college from whit h tin- student con 



English Offerings 



c ompoeitioii Ret lew (5-0-5) 

Institutional ^ redil 

l designed tocorrectdeficiem iesin writing revealed in the Regents' i»-st Prerequisite 

Completion of the English core requirements ol the student's program 

C omposition I (^-0-5) 

Offered ea< h quarter 

Each student must attain si least one of the following prior to enrolling (a) .i score 

of at least 180SA1 Verbal and 40 or above on the rSWE I rest ot Standard Written 

English) or 20 on the verbal s e ct i o n of the ACT, or (b) .i passing score on the 

placement c PE in English and in Reading, or (c) exit Developmental Studies 

English and Developmental Studies Reading successfully. 

For the student having demonstrable ability in reading, writing, and organizing 

ITie student will sharpen his skills bv writing themes oi varying length and 

complexity utilizing techniques learned trom intensive stud) ot essa) s rhe course 

also amis to increase the student's awareness ot language itself Readings in 

addition to the essay ma) be used 

Composition II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ENG 101 orENG l g l 

Gives the student guided practice in reading and compositional skills Thecourse 
introduces literary forms and language — fiction, poetry, drama — using readings in 
And Study of those tonus to Stimulate the writing of inte r p r e ti ve and ( ritual papers 

Honors Composition and Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Minimum gradeof "B" in English 101 and the recommendation 
of the English 101 instructor and approval of the Department Head. 
The student will read and write in greater depth than in English 102 

Selections In World Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 192. 

Completes the Core I sequence. Organized around literary and extra-literary 

materials, the course facilitates student investigation oi enduring issues and ideas 
found in world literature. Research techniques are introduced. The specific content 
in each section of this course is announced quarterly. 

Topics In the Humanities (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: E\G 201. 

A thematic approach to major works in the humanities designed to awaken and 

heighten the student's awareness oi traditional and contemporary issues Topics 

will be announced. 

Honors Composition and Literature (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum gradeof "C" in English 1 92 or minimum grade 

in English 102 and the recommendation of the English 102 instructor 

The student will read and write in greater depth than in English 201 

Please Note: ENG 201 is prerequisite to all ENG 300-400 COUTS 11 and 312 

are prerequisite for all English courses 330 through 4^. except ENG 570 through 

382. 

Introduction to Literary Studies (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

Familiarizes the English major with the vocabulary and approaches of modern 

literary criticism, advances abilities in the reading and interpretation of literary 

texts, and promotes understanding of the tools of literary research and writing. 



144 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 302 Introduction to Composition Studies (5-0-5) 

Students apply theories on the teaching of composition by devising assignments, 
conducting class sessions, writing essays, and responding to academic writing. 

ENG 311 Survey of English Literature I (5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A study of the major works of English literature from its beginnings to the end of the 

18th century. Includes the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser and Milton. 

ENG 312 Survey of English Literature II (5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A study of major works from the beginning of the 19th century to the contemporary 

period. Includes the Romantics, the Victorians and the Moderns. 

ENG 313 World Literature I (5-0-5) 

A study of major works and movements in world literature through the Renaissance. 

ENG 314 World Literature II (5-0-5) 

A study of major works and movements in modern world literature. 

ENG 315 Survey of American Literature I (5-0-5) 

A study of American literature from its beginnings to 1865, with emphasis on 
historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

ENG 316 Survey of American Literature II (5-0-5) 

A study of American literature from 1 865 to the present, with emphasis on historical, 
philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

ENG 341 Early English Literature, Beginnings through 1603. (5-0-5) 

Surveys major English literature from its beginning to the 15th century. Emphasis 
is on the development of a literature that reflects the diversified England of this 800- 
year period. Writers include: the Beowulf poet and other Old English authors, early 
Middle English lyrics and the major figures of the 14th century (the Pearl Poet, 
Chaucer, Langland, Gower). 

ENG 363 Modernism (5-0-5) 

A study of major British and American fiction and poetry of the early twentieth 
century in the context of continental developments. Writers may include Conrad, 
Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Eliot, and Faulkner. 

ENG 365 British, American, and Continental Drama: Ibsen to the Present. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 356 and 357. 

A survey of 19th and 20th century British, American and European plays. Move- 
ments include Realism, the Irish Renaissance. Expressionism, Impressionism, and 
Theater of the Absurd. Ibsen, Shaw, Yeats, O'Casey, Wilde, Strindberg, O'Neill, and 
Williams are among the dramatists studied. 

ENG 372 Technical and Business Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Students learn to report technical information clearly and persuasively. Assign- 
ments include technical descriptions and instructions, memoranda, business letters, 
reports, and research articles. Emphasizes writing and includes oral presentations 
using visual aids. 

ENG 436 The American Novel (5-0-5) 

A study of the American novel as a distinctive literary form. 

ENG 437 American Poetry (5-0-5) 

A study of American poetry in the context of technological developments, philo- 
sophical movements, and literary currents. 

ENG 438 Southern Literature (5-0-5) 

A study of Southern literature in its distinctive social and aesthetic contexts. 

ENG 445 Shakespeare I (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

A comprehensive study of the tragedies, comedies, and history plays drawn from 
Taming of the Shrew, Merchant of Venice, Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado Abowt 
Nothing, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, Richard 11, 
Henry IV Parts 1 and 2, Henry V, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth, 
Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS M5 



Shakespeare il ts-o-s) 

spi jng i'i I .»11 

A second comprehensive study of the tragi >medies and history plays I 

from \ i 

":.■//,• \ A ;/<• Tkt I 

"<-/in<- AWt l\< - // 1*6*4 Etldi Well / V0 i .( nth H 

UJtnu RidmrdlU Henry VI and Henry VW 

rth C cnturv British Poetry and Prose: 1603-1669. (5-0-5) 

Alternate \ ears 

\ survey oi the major non dramaaV literature from the death <>t Elizabeth 1 to the 
reign ol William ind Mar \ tins course places its major emphasis upon the 
metaphysical and classical traditions m English poetry Authors Include Donne, 
fonson Herbert Henries; Crashaw, Vaughan Marvelt Milton. Bacon Brown, 

Human l>r\den. and RochestCI 
18th Century British Poetry and Prose. (5-0-5) 
Spring 

\ survey oi British poetry and prose from l^o to 17B4, this course scquaints 
students with the philosophic Myd aesthetic concerns of the age .is reflet ted t hiefly 

but not exclusively in the works ot Swift, Tope, Johnson, and Fielding 

19th Century I: British Romantic Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Alternates with BNG X53 

An examination of the works of the major Romantic writers including Blake, 

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

19th Century II: British Victorian Poetry and Prose. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 352. 

An examination of the responses of novelists, poets, and prose writers to the issues 
troubling Victorian England: the conflict between science and religion, the faith in 
"progress," the growth of industrialism, the rights of the individual and of the 
society and the role of the artist. 

British Drama 1: Beginnings to 1630. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 357 and 365. 

Medieval and Renaissance Non-Shakespearean drama; stresses the plays of Marlowe 
Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton and Webster; and grounds the student 
in the conventions and traditions of Medieval and early Tudor drama. 

British Drama II. 1630-1800. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with English 356 and 365. 

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama; begins with Pre-Restoration, late 

Caroline drama; and stresses the plays of Ford, Shirley, Dryden, Lee, Otway, 

Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. 

Ancient Epic and Drama (5-0-5) 

Spring. Alternate years. 

A study of major works of antiquity. Authors include Homer, Aesc hyhlS, Sophocles. 

Euripides, and other significant figures. 

Contemporary Literature (5-0-5) 

A study of fiction or poetry (or both) since World War II as it relates to literary 
traditions and cultural movements. Topics may include the following: postmodernist 
fiction, ethnic writers, and confessional poetry. 

Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

The study of expository and argumentative techniques. 
ENG/DRS 473 Rhetoric (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the study of rhetoric, from Aristotle to the present, with 
emphasis on rhetorical analyses of literature and other forms of discourse. 

Creative Writing (Poetry). (5-0-5) 

Students submit poems which they then critique bv written statement and bv class 
discussion under the guidance of the professor. The professor supplements this 
workshop method with a relevant textbook. Students wishing to take the course 
should submit a writing sample to the professor for an initial screening. 



146 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 475 Creative Writing (Fiction). (5-0-5) 

Students submit stories which they then critique by written statement and by class 
discussion under the guidance of the professor. The professor supplements this 
workshop method with a relevant textbook. Students wishing to take the course 
should submit a writing sample to the professor for an initial screening. 

ENG/LIN 480 Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

A study of current approaches to grammar (including generative transforma- 
tional); phonology, morphology and syntax are studied. 

ENG/LIN 482 History of English Language (5-0-5) 

A study of the English language from its beginnings in the fifth and sixth centuries 
to its worldwide expansion in the 20th. Traces the language chronologically from Old 
to Middle to Modern English. Emphasis is on the phonetic, syntactic, and lexical 
changes with weight given both to internal and external influences. 

ENG 490 Independent Study (1 -5)-0-(l -5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status or department head's approval. Available to transient 
students under the following conditions: approval of the Dean of the faculty and Dean 
of the college from which the student comes. 

ENG 491 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status or department head's approval. Available to transient 
students under the following conditions; approval of the Dean of the Faculty and Dean 
of the college from which the student comes. 

ENG 499 Internship (Up to 15 hrs) 

Offered by Special arrangement. Prerequisite: Junior status, a 2.5 GPA, a supervisory 
staff member, recommendation of the departmental internship Committee, and 
approval of the Department head. May be repeated to a maximum of 1 5 credit hours. 
The student pursues an individually designed project involving off-campus work, 
study, and /or research. Projects are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring 
institution and the staff member. Fifteen hours credit requires forty hours a week at 
the sponsoring institution. Ten hours credit requires twenty-five hours a week; five 
hours credit requires fifteen hours a week. 

ENG 500 Special Topic (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered . Subjects include: Modernism: 1 880-1 940, 
Apartheid in Perspective; World-wide English Literature, Decadence, Women in 
Literature. 

ENG 501 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Genres include: New England Poets, 
Victorian Novel, Eighteenth Century Novel, Russian Novel, Southern Fiction, 
British Drama, Short Story. 

ENG 502 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Faulkner, Joyce, 
Dickens, Twain, Hardy, Fielding, Chaucer, Milton, Dante, Frost, Dickinson, Austen, 
and Flannery O'Connor. 

Film Offerings 

FLM/DRS 340 Development of the Cinema (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the history and development of the cinema with special emphasis on the 

American dominance of the medium. 

FLM/DRS 349 Television Theory and Criticism (5-0-5) 

See DRS/FLM 349 for course description. 

FLM/DRS 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Same as JRN 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

FLM/DRS 351 Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Studies in the translation of literature to film with emphasis on the differences of the 
media in form, content, and perception. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



147 



II M DRS401 lupus In I ilm | | | 

PrtrtqukHc i i \i ISO « I II 

Bp* i.il Mlb^M t matter is .iiiinunu fil \s lu-n thn OUJ 

•uteun and i r it u al theoi \ 



Foreign Language Offerings 
P rp rwpiiffi tf (of ill foreign language! 



101 and Spanish 105 is eligibility for English mi 



FRI 101/102 
103 



FRE 201 



FRE210 



FRE 211 



FRE 300 



FRE 310 



FRE 311 



FRE 320 



FRE 351/352 
/353 



i lementari I rench One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Offered ea< h year 

Pto\ Ida the student with the dements oi Preiu h grammar, promnui.it ion. tnd 

comprehension, together with in Introduction to the culture snd civilization oi the 

French ipeaking world Regularpracticewith taper* ordingsb required No foreign 

languagebackground Isnecessar) tobegin 101. 

Intermediate French (5-0-5) 

O f fered each year Prerequisite: Diree quarters o( i ollege Freiu h or permission oi 

Instructor. 

Continues to develop reading writing, listening and speaking skills 

French Conversation and Compositon I (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: FRE 201 or equivalent. 

Emphasis is on conversational French in simulated situations to develop gn 
oral proficiency and to promote continued Bwareness oi the French ipeaking 

culture. Students will review grammar and syntax through guided essa) 

develop writing skills in the contact language. Classes will becondiu ted entirely in 

F rench. 

French Conversation and Composition II. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 210 

The continuation of French 210. 

Advanced Grammar and Syntax (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 211 or equivalent. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of the French. 

stressing oral usage through written grammar exercises. Classes conducted in 

French. 

French Civilization I. 

Prerequisite: French 211 or equivalent. 

Survey of the culture and civilization of France. Areas oi study include history, 
geography, politics, the arts, and daily life from the middle ages to the Revolution 
Classes will be conducted entirely in French. 

French Civilization II. 

Prerequisites: French 211 or equivalent. 

Continuation of French 310. The analysis of contemporary French societ 
phy, sociology, art, and science since 1799 (the French Revolution). This course will 
also survey the cultures of other French-speaking countries ( lasses will be con- 
ducted entirely in French. 

Special Topics In French Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE300 

Subject matter is announced when the course is o ff ered. Includes survej 

Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century literature. Classes conducted in French. 

Study Abroad in France (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: FRE 103. 

A summer quarter's residence and study in France in conjunction with the Studies 
Abroad Program of the University System oi Georgia. The program lasts tor a 
period of 8-9 weeks. The student receives intensive instruction in language and 
culture and participates in University-sponsored activiti 



1 48 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FRE 401 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 320 or permission of instructor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Subjects include: Seven- 
teenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Fiction and Theatre. Classes 
conducted in French. 

FRE 402 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 320 or permission of instructor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Flaubert, 

Hugo, Zola, Malraux, Camus. 

FRE 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: FRE 320 or approval of instructor. 

Transient students may take this course only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 

at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

FRE 499 Language Internship. (0-6-3) 

Offered by special arrangement. 

Prerequisites: Junior status, a minimum 2.75 overall G.P.A., a 3.0 G.P.A. in French, 
recommendation of the department head and an instructor of French. 
The student pursues an individually designed project involving off-campus in- 
struction at the elementary school level (grades 1-6). Each week the student will 
prepare for five hours to teach a one hour class. A supervisor from the sponsoring 
institution and an instructor of French will coordinate instruction with the class- 
room teacher and the intern. The ASC instructor will observe the student's class 
twice quarterly and evaluate the teaching. 

GER 101/102 

/103 Elementary German One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provide the student with the elements of German grammar, pronunciation, and 
oral comprehension, together with an introduction to the culture and civilization of 
the German-speaking world. Regular practice with tape recordings is required. No 
foreign language background is necessary to begin 101. 

GER 201 Intermediate German (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college German or permission of 

instructor. 

Continues to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

GER 300 Special Topic In the German Language (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 201. 

Readings in the various uses of German, from the popular to the literary, throughout 

the history of the language. 

GER 305 Special Topics In German Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 201. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Topics include: surveys of 

Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Century German literature. 

GER 351/352 

/353 Study Abroad In Germany (V-V15) 

Prerequisite: GER 103. 

An 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study at the Friedrich Alexandar 
University at Erlangen, Germany. An IISP program operating in conjunction with 
the University of Georgia; offers intensive instruction in the German language and 
culture, complemented by a number of excursions. 

GER 401 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 305 or permission of instructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Subjects include: Medieval Poetry; 
Prose, Poetry, and Drama in the 17th and 18th Century; the Novella in the 19th 
Century; 20th Century Prose. 

GER 402 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 305 or permission of instructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Grimmeishausen, 

Goethe, Schiller, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Grass. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS M9 

c.i R m ladtptndtnl Stodj (1-5MM1-5) 

rYertquisite approval »>t Inetfia toi 01 ( .1 k 201 I ransienl students may tal 

OOUfMOnl) \Mth (Hiiuissioniil the I V.m »>! Lu tilt\ .it \r mstrODg .mil thr. oUcgi 

u hk h the student i omes 
I \i 101 10: 
109 i tanentary i atta Out, I wo, Throe (5-0-8) 

1 hree uuirsfs ottered eai h veai 

Essentials oi granunai ' tradings from nr If rtf d I stin authors 

LAT 201 intermediate Latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite rhree quarters oi i oUcge I son or three yean oi high si hool I .it in 

Purthet nradingn in I stin literature with ipe< lal emphasis on V »-rgii end ( h Id 
LAT 300 Readings In Latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite l Al 201 

Readings from the 2.000 years oi I atinity from Plautus to the re* enl em yt Ik .»K 

LAT 301 Readings In Latin II (5-0-5) 

Readings oi I stir poetry; may include Horace, Catullus, Ovid, P ropert i us, end 

Tibullus 

LAT 302 Ovid (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT201. 

Readings from the Metamorphoses, with emphasis on familiar mythology, and from 

Othei selected works. 

LAT/CIA 351 

/352Z353 Study Abroad In Rome and Athens (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: LAT 103. 

An 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study in Rome and Athens m 
conjunction with the Studies Abroad Program of the University System of Georgia 
Taught in English. Through visits to monuments, museums, and classical rums. 
and on excursions to Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tarquinia, and Frascati, the 
student experiences first hand the reality of life in the ancient world. 

LAT 396 Latin Language and Culture In Rome (15-0-15) 

Summer. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or the equivalent. 

Classes meet in Rome for 3 hours a day, 6 days a week, for 7 weeks, to speak, read, 
and hear Latin. Students practice composition outside of class and travel to places 
of cultural significance. 

LAT 401 Vergil (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT 201 , permission of professor. 

Readings from the Aeneid, with emphasis on books II, IV, VI, and VIII, and from 

other selected works. 

SPA 101/102 

/103 Elementary Spanish One-Two-Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provide the student with the elements of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and oral 
comprehension, together with an introduction to the culture and civilization ot the 
spanish-speaking world. Regular practice with tape recordings is required . No foreign 
language background is necessary to begin 101. 

SPA 105 Spanish for Survival in Health Care Delivery Systems (5-0-5) 

A one-quarter designed for the student who has had little or no formal study oi 
Spanish. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the most basic 
communications skills in the language so that he/she might be able to deal with 
non-English speaking patients in a wide variety of clinical situations. This course 
will fulfill the CPC requirement in foreign languages. 

SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Spanish or permission of 

instructor. 

Continues to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 



1 50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SPA 210 Spanish Conversation and Composition I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 201 or equivalent. 

Emphasis is on conversational Spanish in simulated situations to develop greater 
oral proficiency and to promote continued awareness of Hispanic culture. Review 
of grammar and syntax through guided essays to develop writing skills in the 
contact language. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 211 Spanish Conversation and Composition II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 210. 

The continuation of Spanish 210. 

SPA 301 Advanced Grammar and Syntax (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of Spanish, stressing 
written usage through written grammar exercises, essays and translations of English 
texts into Spanish. Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 302 Advanced Grammar and Syntax for Native Speakers 
of Spanish (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of Spanish for the 
native speakers of Spanish, stressing written usage through written grammar 
exercises and essays. Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 310 Civilization and Culture of Spain I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

An historical survey of the culture of Spain from the Pre-Roman era to the end of 

the Hapsburg Dynasty (1700). Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 311 Civilization and Culture of Spain II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

The continuation of Spanish 310. An historical survey of Modern Spain, from the 
establishment of the Bourbon Dynasty (1 700) to the present. Classes will be conducted 
entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 312 Civilization and Culture of Latin America (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

An historical survey of the culture of Latin America from the pre-Columbian era to 

the present day. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 320 Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 301 or equivalent. 

This course will provide the student with methods of analysis for approaching a 
literary text in Spanish. Selected pieces of poetry, prose and drama from the 
Hispanic tradition will be selected for analysis. Classes will be conducted entirely 
in Spanish. 

SPA 351/352 

/353 Study Abroad In Spain (V-V-l-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 103 and a 3.0 minimum G.P.A. in all Spanish course work. 
A 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study at the Universidad de Salamanca 
in Salamanca, Spain. An I.I.S.P. program operating in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia, offers intensive instruction in languages and culture 
complemented by a number of excursions. 

SPA 401 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 320 or permission of the instructor. 

Hispanic Literature: Subject is announced when course is offered. Classes will be 

conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 402 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 320 or permission of instructor. 

Hispanic Literature: Subject is announced when course is offered. Classes will be 

conducted entirely in Spanish. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 151 



SPA 403 Special topics <S 

Prerequisite Spanish 120 01 permission o( InstnM t"r 

Hiapanit l iterature Subject is announced when course 

ofnispank literary topics luchaj The Anti-hero in Spaniah Lia • Dm 

rheme ol tfu- Put. nor In l atta American i Iteratui 

entirely In Spanish 
SPA 404 sp.uush rhoiu-t.es (5-0-5) 

Prere q uisite Spanish K)1 or permission oi lnstru< tor 

l his course will examine me phonological system oi the Spanish lai lasses 

will be conducted entirely in Spanish 
SPA 190 Independent Study (1-5)0(1-5) 

Prerequisite* Approval oi Lnstjuctorand SPA 201 I ransienl itudents ma) takethii 

course only with the permission oi the Dean oi Faculty .it Armstrong and the< ollege 

from wrhk h me student comes 

SPA 4W I anguage Internship (0-6-3) 

Ordered by special arrangement Prerequisites [unior status, a oiinimum 2 75m eraO 
c. r \ i3.0G P \ in Spanish, recommendation ot tin- departmental internship 
committee, and approval o! the department head and ■ Spanish faculty member 

The student pursues an individually designed project i n vol vmgott -cam pus instruct ion 
at the elementary school level (grades 1-M. Weekly preparation ot five hours 
towards a class instruction period of one hour is expected. The project is under 
Supervision ot the sponsoring institution and a Spanish faculty member who will 
coordinate it with the classroom teacher and the intern. The supervisor in charge will 
evaluate by observation (twice quarterly) the quality of the intern's performance 

Journalism Offerings 

JRN 343 Journalistic Writing and Editing (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ENG 201. 

Investigation of and intensive practice in the techniques of modern journalism with 

emphasis on writing and editing for newspapers and magazines 

JRN 347 Basic TV Production (2-9-5) 

Alternates with DRS 400, Spring, Fall. Same as DRS 347 

A study of the theory and practice of television production styles, forms, and 
concepts, with special emphasis on the critical appreciation ot electronic commu- 
nication techniques. 

JRN 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM / DRS 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

JRN 400 Topics In Journalism (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: JRN' 340 or 343 or permission of instructor. 
A seminar on the impact of the media on the world today. Topics include rights and 
responsibilities of journalists, censorship, media control, propaganda, and other 
current issues. 

Linguistics Offerings 

LIN 470 Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. Same as ENG 370. 
A study of expository and report techniques. 

LIN 480 Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as ENG /LIN 380. 

A study of current approaches to grammar (including generative transformational); 

phonology, morphology, and syntax will be studied. 

LIN 482 History of the English Language (50-5) 

Same as ENG /LIN 382. 



1 52 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



LIN 500 Topics In Linguistics (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: ENG — LIN 380 or 382 or permission of the instructor. 

A seminar in subjects of interest in both theoretical and applied linguistics. Topics 

are announced. The course may be taken more than once for credit as topics change. 

Philosophy Offerings 

Please Note: ENG 101 is prerequisite: to all following PHI courses. 

PHI 201 Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the basic themes, problems, vocabulary, and representative figures 
of philosophy. 

PHI 301 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (5-0-5) 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development of European 
philosophy from the early Greeks through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on 
selected works of major philosophers. 

PHI 302 16th, 17th, 18th Century Philosophy (5-0-5) 

European philosophy from the Renaissance through Kant, emphasizing selected 
works of major philosophers. 

PHI 303 19th and 20th Century Philosophy (5-0-5) 

A study of the major philosophers and philosophical movements of the 1 9th and 20th 
centuries. 

PHI 400 Special Topics (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: PHI 201 or a 300 philosophy course. 
Subject is announced when the course is offered . Current courses: Aesthetics, Philoso- 
phy of Religion, Ethics, Nietzsche. 

PHI 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Senior status and one 300-philosophy course. 
The student, with the advice and consent of this supervising professor and of the 
department head, selects the topic for supervised independent study and submits a 
prospectus for department approval before the quarter in which the course is to be 
taken. Transient students may take this course only with permission of the Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 153 



Mathematics and Computer Science 

I M ult\ 

• WheeJei i d Department Heed 

• Barnard fane lodis, Stephen 

iuk..t Mex ' Kilhefner, Dak 

Findeis fohn Matthew s, Robert 

• l lansen |ohn M< \iill.m. I im 
Mollis Selwyn Munsoiv Richard 

• Hudson Aniu" Shipley, ( harles 
Hudson Sigmund White, Laurie 

• c Graduate i acuity 

I he Mathematics and C omputer s ^ ieiu e I tepartmenl otters ,i wide r,m^' oi servk as 
to the \ s c student Several Introductory courses are available both to s.uistv the general 
edu< ation needs ot the student and to satisfy pre r e q uisites in the major program a minor 
m either mathematics or <. omputer sc ience can bo designed to complement the rost ot a 

student s program. A major in the mathematical sciences allows the student to choose 
trom among tour Options; a flexible computer science major meets the needs ot students 
with a number ot different interests 

The Mathematical Sciences Malor: Option I oi this major is entitled "Mathematics 
and prepares students intending to pursue graduate studies in mathematics. Option 3 is 
entitled Mathematics Education" and prepares students to teach in public and private 
Secondary schools. This option is an approved program for the Georgia Teachers 
Professional Four Year Certificate (T-4). Option 4 is entitled "Computer Science" and is 
available tor students who desire a dual concentration in mathematics and computer 
science. 

The most flexible of the four options is Option 2 entitled "Applied Mathematics." This 
option is a good choice for students preparing for a variety of careers in business and 
industry, intending to attend graduate school in a quantitative area such as biostatistk s. 
economics, or operations research, or wishing to participate in a Dual-Degree Program 
in engineering. 

The Computer Science Major: In recent years this major has equipped many students 
to step into a broad spectrum of jobs in the computer industry. The degree features a corf 
of courses designed to provide a solid foundation in theoretical computer science .is well 
as practical programming experience. After finishing the core, students choose from 
several optional senior level tracks that give an individual focus to the major. At present 
students may choose from tracks in large software system development, computer 
systems, knowledge-based systems, and scientific computation. A varietv of internships 
and cooperative education placements provide students with opportunities for practical 
experience in the discipline. 

Important Note: In August of 1991 the computer science major was accredited by the 
Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC). The two CSAC accredited com- 
puter science programs in the state of Georgia are found at Armstrong State College and 
Georgia Institute of Technology. The Computer Science Accreditation Commission is an 
agent of the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accrediting 
body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) and the I s 
Department of Education. 

Co-ops and Internships: Students in computer science are able to compete tor 
cooperative education positions and internships at major Savannah employers such as 
Gulfstream and Savannah Foods. Such positions provide students invaluable opportu- 
nities to acquire practical experience that complements their classroom experience. 

The Dual Degree Program: Under arrangements with Georgia Tech, students may in 
five years of study earn simultaneously the BS degree in the mathematical sciences from 



1 54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Armstrong and the Bachelor's degree in any one of a number of fields of engineering from 
Georgia Tech. Armstrong participates in similar programs with other major universities. 
Students considering this option should contact an advisor in the Mathematics and 
Computer Science Department as soon as possible. 

Minors: Students in any major program whatever (either two year or four year) can 
augment their major with a minor in mathematics or a minor in computer science. 

Minor in Mathematics: 

1. MAT 207, 208, 216 

2. Ten additional quarter hours chosen from MAT 260, MAT 265, 300-400 level 
mathematics courses (excluding MAT 391 and MAT 393). MAT 260 and MAT 265 
may not both be included in the minor. 

Minor in Computer Science: 

1. CS242 

2. Four of CS 262 or 300-400 level courses (excluding CS 400, 496, 497) 

Special Academic Regulations: 

1. To earn the BS degree in the mathematical sciences or computer science, a 
student must successfully complete with a grade of C or better all mathematics 
and computer science courses required in the program of study. 

2. To fulfill the prerequisites for any mathematics or computer science course one 
must obtain a grade of "C" (or above) in each prerequisite course except 
Mathematics 101. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 103,206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 128, 129 (required for 

dual degree students); PHY 217, 218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and one course selected from: PSY 101 (required for 

math education option); SOC 201; ECO 201, 202; ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. CS142 5 

2. MAT 207, 208, 216, 260 20 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Major Field Requirements 30 

Option One — Mathematics: 

1. MAT 309, 311, 401 

2. One of MAT 317, 402, or 416 

3. Additional approved electives in mathematics 
Option Two — Applied Mathematics 

1. MAT 321, 341 

2. One of CS 231, 246, 242 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 155 



I OneoJ MAI 111, 117, 401 416 

i Uctttkmal courses how MAI 
Option rhree Mathematics Education 

l MAI 111 121 136 
MAI 416 Of 470 

I Additional ap p rov ed mathematics elective! 
Option Foui Computer Science 

l MAI 121 

OneoJ MAI 122 141 M6 

I ( 5242 101, 105 

C. Courses Related to Major 2^ 

Option One Mathematics 

1. Language or approved computer science 10 

2. Approved electives from mathematics or related field 1 5 

Option Two — Applied Mathematics 
One ot the following sequences 

1. PHY 217, 218, 219 with additional approved electives in chemistrv, 
phvsics, or engineering 

2. ACC 211, 212 and ECO 201, 202, 330 

3. Approved computer science courses 

4. Approved biology courses including BIO 370 or 480 

5. Approved chemistry courses 
Option Three — Mathematics Education 

1. PSY201 orEDN201 

2. EDN200,335,441,EXC410 
Option Four — Computer Science 

1 . CS 312 and approved electives in computer science 

D. Electives 40 

Students in Options 1, 2, and 4 may choose any electives. Students in option 3 must use 

these hours to complete student teaching. 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 128, 129; PHY 217, 218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 292 10 

2. POS 113 and one of the courses: PSY 101; SOC 201; ECO 201, 202; 

ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. MAT 207, 265 

2. CS 142, 242, 262 

3. HIS 251 or 252 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



156 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



B. Major Field Requirements 45 

1 . CS 303, 304, 312, 326, 334, 342 

2. Three courses chosen from one of the following groups: 

a. Large Software System Development: CS 346, 426, 434, 445, 461 

b. Computer Systems: CS 346, 421, 426, 445 

c. Knowledge-based Systems: CS 414, 461, 481 

d. Scientific Computation: CS 353, 414, 445, 481 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. ENG372 

2. MAT 321 

3. One course from MAT 208, 216, 322, 346, 353 

4. A third quarter of laboratory science completing the sequence begun in 
Area 2: 

a) BOT 203 or Zoo 204 

b) CHE 211 or CHE 341 

c) PHY 219 

5. Two additional approved electives from scientific disciplines. 

D. Electives 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 



191 



OFFERINGS 



Mathematics Offerings 

MAT 101 College Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: A score of at least 380 on the mathematics 
portion of the SAT or a passing score on the Collegiate Placement Exam (CPE). 
Real and complex number arithmetic; polynomial and rational expressions, equations 
and inequalities, functions and graphs; inequalities; absolute value; sequences and 
summation notation; matrices and systems of equations; the binomial theorem; 
techniques of counting and elementary probability. 

Placement Recommendation: Some students who satisfy the prerequisite for MAT 1 01 
nonetheless need to reinforce their mathematical skills in a developmental studies 
mathematics course before taking MAT 101. Specifically, if any of the following is 
true, the student should consider enrolling in DSM 98 or 99: 

a) The student did not complete two years of algebra and one year of geometry in 
high school. 

b) The student has not completed a mathematics course in five or more years. 

c) The student made below 420 on the mathematics portion of the SAT examination. 

MAT 103 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101, a score of at least 550 on the 
mathematics portion of the SAT, or permission of the department head. 
Functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and in- 
verse trigonometric; trigonometric identities; law of sines and cosines; complex 
numbers. 

MAT 195 Applied Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

An applied mathematics course featuring applications in economics and the social 
sciences. Linear functions and models; matrix operations and applications; in- 
equalities and linear programming; exponential functions and log functions; single 
and multivariant differentiation. 

MAT 206 Calculus I (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 103, a score of at least 600 on the 
mathematics portion of the SAT, or permission of the department head. 
Functions; the derivative and its applications, antidifferentiation; the definite 
integral. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



157 



c ilculm ii (5-0-5) 

Kill Winter Spring SumflMi Prerequitita \i \ i 

rechnique* and applications of integration conk iectfa 

c alculua of Several \ iriablea i (8-0-0) 

hill Winter Spring Prerequttitt MAI 2 

Parametrk «. ur\ at and vectortin t hi- plane Indeterminate forma I .i\ i<t i formula 

and Im proper Integral! Infinite mi lea vectora curvet, and aurf acta in a| 

differentiation 

l Ineai Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequiaitc MAI 207 

i Ineai ay atema and matri< at * e< tor apaott; lineai Independent »-. r.mk oi •> n 

lineai banaformationa; determinanta; lntrodu< don toeigenvalueeand tigi 

diagonalization; applications 

Elementary Statistics (5-0-5) 

Pall, Winter, Spring, Summer Prere q uiaitc MAI 101 

Meaturea oi central tendent \ and diaperaion; probabilit) distributions, uuen 

concerning meant; analyeitol variance; correlation; lineai regreaaion 

Introduction to Mathematical Proof (5-0-5) 

Winter Prerequititea MAI 207 

Elementary logic sett! functions and relations, methods of proof Including indtK 

tion. and selected topics from abstract algebra. 

Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science 

Prerequisites MAT 103and CS 142. 

Elementary logic; naive set theory; relations and functions; graphs; finite automata; 

Turing machines; formal languages and grammars. 

The Spirit and Structure of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

A terminal course of selected topics designed to portray the history, philosophy, and 
aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an appreciation of the role of ma thematic i 
in western thought and contemporary culture. 

Calculus of Several Variables II (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Multiple integrals and their applications; vector fields; line and surface integrals 

Green's theorem; the Divergence theorem; Stokes theorem; differential equations 

Abstract Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

Elementary properties of integers; groups, rings, and fields; mappings, homomor- 

phisms, kernels, and quotient structures. 

Advanced Linear Algebra (5-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 21 6, MAT 260. 

Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, diago- 
nalization, inner product spaces, real quadratic forms. 

Probability & Mathematical Statistics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207. MAT 260 or MAT 265. 

Data collection, organization, and description; probability; random variables; 
discrete and continuous probability distributions; Central Limit Theorem; point and 
interval estimation; tests of hypotheses; simple linear regression and correlation. 

Probability & Mathematical Statistics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 321 . 

Analysis of variance; nonlinear and multiple regression; chi-square tests for cat- 
egorical data; nonparametric methods; Bayesian inference. This course uses statistical 
packages to analyze data sets. 

Modern Geometry (5-0-5) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 
A survey of topics from Euclidean geometrv 



158 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 341/342 Differential Equations I, II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Ordinary differential equations; series solutions; systems of first order differential 
equations, the Laplace transform; introduction to Fourier series; partial differential 
equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; applied problems; numerical solutions with 
emphasis on computer aided solution. 

MAT 346 Mathematical Modeling and Optimization (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 321 . 

Design, solution, and interpretation of mathematical models of problems in the social, 
life, and management sciences. Topics chosen from linear programming, dynamic 
programming, scheduling theory, Markov chains, game theory, queuing theory, 
inventory theory, and computer based simulation. Various projects are assigned 
which require computer software packages for solution. 

MAT 353 Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 120 or 142. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations; numerical 
integration and numerical solution of differential equations; matrix inversion; 
evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary 
value problems. 

MAT 360 Mathematical Logic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207, 260. 

The elementary statement and predicate calculus; formal systems; applications of 

logic in mathematics. 

MAT 391 Mathematics for the Elementary School Teacher (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101, 103 or 290, and admission to Teacher Education. 
A study of the mathematics in the K-6 curriculum, with emphasis on appropriate 
methods of teaching for understanding through activity based and problem solving 
experiences. Communication and connections will be emphasized. Frequent use of 
wide range of concrete manipulatives to embody concepts in arithmetic and whole 
numbers, fractions and decimals, and in geometry and measurement. Directed field 
experience and required laboratory. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 

MAT 393 Teaching of Middle School/ General Mathematics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 391 

Problems of teaching traditional topics such as fractions, decimals, percentage, 
measurement (especially the metric system), informal geometry, algebraic struc- 
tures, probability, and statistics. Cooperative learning in an activity -based, problem 
solving environment will be emphasized. Incorporation of drill and practice in 
necessary skills with appropriate games and laboratory exercises. Directed field 
experience and required laboratory. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 

MAT 400 Putnam Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

A variety of mathematical problems, considered with the aim of developing 

problem solving techniques. 

MAT 401/402 Advanced Calculus I, II (5-5) 
Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

The real number system; sequences; limits of functions; the Bolzano-Weierstrass 
theorem; compactness; uniform continuity; the derivative; the Riemann integral; 
Euclidean n-space; sequences of functions; the Weierstrass approximation theorem; 
series; elementary functions. 

MAT 406 Functions of a Complex Variable (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

Complex numbers; elementary functions and transformations; the Cauchy theory; 

conformal mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem. 






MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE IM 



\i \i 4ib ihi«(»r\ .it Ntunbcn (5-0-5) 
Prerequisites M \ I 
Divisibility ind congruence diophantine equation! distribution of pi 

famous unsoh ed problems; numbei theore tk functions and their appln 
I heoremsoi \ trmat and Eulei quadratk reciprocity; selected topi 
ind analytk numbei kheof) 

mm IM ropologi 0-0-3) 

Prerequisite \i\ I 401 

! opological spaces and homecaiKwplusms; separabilit) ;< ompe* mei 
tnpleteness; metrizabiiity; introduction tohomotop) theon 

MAT 470 Histon ot Mathematics <=i-0-5) 

P rerequisites M \ I 206 ind six quarter hours oi mathematu i courses k Ith 

numbers gre a ter than "u^ 

\ surve) ol the development ol mathematics from its empirical beginningi t*> its 

pr esen t state 

MAT 490 Special Topics (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered by special arrangement Prerequisites: Consent oi me instructor and permisv 

sion ol the department head. 

Individual readings and research under the direction of a member oi the mathematics 

faculty. 

MAT 496/497 
| /498 Internship In Mathematics ((0-l)-(12-15)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite Permission of the department head 
Experience, In a variety of mathematical applications suited to the educational and 
pro f e ss ional aspirations oi the student, under the direction ot the faculty and 
a p propriate off-campus supervisory personnel. (Open to transient students only with 
permission oi the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and that of the appropriate official 
of the college from which the student comes.) 



Computer Science Offerings 

CS 115 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

The study ot hard ware and soft ware components of computers, elementarv program- 
ming, and the impact of the computer on society. Discussion oi the capabilities and 
the limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems that are best solved by 
computers. Experience with developing and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis on the major uses of computers. This course is designed for the non - 
computer science major. It ma v not be applied as part of a language sequence C red it 
will be granted for only one of CS 1 1 5, CS 1 1 6, and CS 296. 

CS116 Honors Computer Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 103. 

This course replaces CS 115 for selected students. While the subject matter will be 
similar to the subject matter inCS 1 15, the treatment will have greater depth due to 
the higher mathematical experience of the students. Mathematical software pack- 
ages will be included in the laboratorv component Credit will be granted for only 
one of CS 1 1 5, CS 1 1 6, and CS 296. 

CS120 Introduction to BASIC Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 . 

BASIC programming and program structure; elementary logic and Boolean algebra; 
algorithms; flow charts; debugging; computer solutions of numeric and non-numeric 
problems; characteristics and applications of computers in moden Credit 

will not apply toward a degree in computer science.) 

CS 136 RPG Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 120 or 142. 

Introduction to the language and programming applications for small computer 

L systems using RPG. 



160 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CS 142 Introduction to Programming Principles with Pascal (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

Structured programming; the Pascal programming language; basic syntax, input/ 

output, debugging, functions and procedures, fundamental data types. 

CS 225 Statistical Programming for the Social Sciences (3-4-5) 

Winter (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 220 or 321 and CS 120 or 142. 

Uses of computers in statistical analysis, including the study of statistical methods, 

the programming of statistical analyses, and data analysis using packaged systems. 

CS 242 Advanced Programming Principles with Pascal (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 142. 

Advanced programming concepts in Pascal: recursion, variant records, record- 
oriented input-output and dynamic structures associated with pointers such as 
linked lists, queues, stacks and trees. 

CS 246 Fortran Programming (2-3-3) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 120 or CS 142. 

Algorithmic processes of computer problem solving in a scientific context; FORTRAN 

programming language: syntax, arrays, input-output, subroutines, functions. 

CS 247 Programming Principles with COBOL (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 142. 

The COBOL programming language: basic syntax, input-output, debugging, table- 
handling, sorting, searching, sequential and random file manipulation, structured 
programming for COBOL. 

CS 262 Introduction to File Structures (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 242. 

An introduction to the concepts and techniques of accessing data in files on 
secondary devices. Includes sequential, relative, and indexed access methods, and 
tree-structured organizations. Also includes security and ethics, introductory and 
relational database system concepts, and external sorting. 

CS 296 Computer Literacy for Educators (2-3-3) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MAT 101. 

The study of hardware and software components of computers, elementary pro- 
gramming, and the impact of computers on curriculum. Discussion of the capabilities 
and limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems that are best solved by 
computers. Experience with developing and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis on instructional uses of microcomputers. This course is 
designed for the non-computer science major. It may not be applied as part of a 
language sequence. Credit will be granted for only one of CS 115, CS 116, and 
CS 296. 

CS 303 Computer Organization and Architecture I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 242. 

Hardware and software concepts of digital computing systems, with emphasis on 
fundamental system software and details of hardware operation. Topics include 
virtual machines, systems organization, digital logic, and microprogramming. 

CS 304 Computer Organization and Architecture II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 303. 
Continuation of CS 303. Topics include instruction and data formats, addressing 
modes, instruction types, flow of control, assembly language programming, and 
advanced computer architectures, including RISC machines and parallel architec- 
tures. 

CS 312 Algorithms and Data Structures (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 242 and MAT 265. 
Abstract data types; algorithms for the manipulation of data structures; analysis of 
algorithms; concepts related to the interaction between data structures and storage 
structures for the generating, developing, and processing of data; algorithms for 
memory management. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Itl 



Operating System KM Q 

Prerequisite ( v ' KM 

Concepts '.(uiituic snd mechanisms of opera tinf 

u'sscs , i'iu iiin-iu \ mt'iimn management ftchedulinj 
scheduling snd file management 

Software i ngineeriitg c o n ccp ti l (4-3-5) 

requisite! ( v > it 2 ind I N< . ; 

Principles and techniques o( designing and implementing soft* 

eluding system 1 1 1 «. - cycle models, planning techniques, requin 

systems specification hmari int erfac e s , design, implementation, testing mainte 

nance, team structure and proved management rhe role and responsibilii 

computing professionals A student project encompassing some 01 ill o( 

tec Kniques wrill be required 

Comparative I anguages (4-3-5) 

Prerequisitefl ( S KM and MA I 

i omperath e stud) of programming languages int luding tat ilities t<»r pro< edures, 

parameter passing and re< union, control stria hires, and storage <» l K >*- ation t«-^ h 

niques Methods oi specifying syntax and semantics Introduction to proj 

translation 

'O Programming under UNIX (tm) (4-3-5) 

Prere qu isite CS 342. 

rhe C programming language: basi< syntax, types, oper a tors and expressions, 

statements, modular programming, arrays, structures, unions and pointers l NIX (tarn) 

s\ stem programming techniques: I/O forking, pipes, signals, interrupts. Software 

tools macros, conditional compilation, passing values to thecompiler. lint, symbolic 
debugging, source codecontrol, libraries. 

Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 1 42. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations numerical 
integration and numerical solution of differential equations; matrix inversion; 
evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, boundary 
value problems. 

Programming Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisite: CS 242. 

A variety of programming problems, considered with the aim of developing problem 

solving techniques. 

Computer Graphics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 312. 

Introduction tocomputer graphics: hardwareand software. Algorithms for computer 
graphicsprogramming. Windows^lipping^woandthreedimensional transforma- 
tions, hidden line and hidden surface removal. Graphics standards for hard ware and 
software systems. 

Data Communications and Computer Networks (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: CS 305. 

Communications media; codes; data transmission; multiplexing; protocols; lay- 
ered networks. 

Operating System Concepts II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 326 and an elementarv knowledge of 'C. 
Case studies of UNIX and /or similar operating systems. 

Software Engineering Concepts II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 334. 

Advanced software engineering principles, including software processes and 
methodologies, CASE tools, software metrics, software quality assurance, reusabil- 
ity and reengineering, and future trends. A student project encompassing some or 
all of these techniques will be required. 



162 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CS 445 Compiler Theory (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 312, 342. 

Study of programming language translation and basic compiler implementation 
techniques. Formal grammars and languages; specification of syntax and seman- 
tics; lexical analysis; parsing; semantic processing. 

CS 461 Database Systems (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 334. 

Database management system concepts and architecture; the relational, hierarchi- 
cal, network, entity-relationship, and other models; design concepts; internal 
implementation techniques. 

CS 481 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 342 and MAT 265. 

The basic concepts of artificial intelligence including production systems, knowl- 
edge representation, pattern matching, heuristic search, logical and probabilistic 
reasoning, and expert systems. The social, cultural, and economic impact of 
artificial intelligence. 

CS 490 Special Topics In Computer Science ((0-5)-(0-15)-(l-5)) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and permission of the department head. 
Selected topics in some area of current interest in computer science; possible areas 
include system simulation, graphics, and microcomputers. 

CS 496/497 

/498 Internship In Computer Science ((0-l)-(12-15)-(l-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. 
May not be taken concurrently. 

Experience, in a variety of computing environments suited to the educational and 
professional aspirations of the student, under the direction of a member of the faculty 
and appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. 

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Faculty 

* Martin, Grace, Division Head 

* Adams, Joseph * Palefsky, Elliot 
Douglass, Keith Saadatmand, Yassaman 

* Lane, Joseph Taylor, Stephen 
McCormick, Cynthia, Walker, Deborah 

Coordinator of Psychology 

* Graduate Faculty 

Students are advised to complete as many of the general degree requirements as 
possible before entering their junior year. Psychology majors should take PSY 101 and 220 
before the end of their sophomore years. Suggested course distributions and annual 
schedules are available in the department office. All students are urged to seek advise- 
ment with regard to degree requirements and scheduling. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: CHE 121, 122, or PHS 121, 122 10 






SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 163 



Am in 

1 HIS 114 oi 191 115 cm 192 POS n I 
I ( O201 orSOC 201 

Area l\ 

i no ioi 102 i" 

: ( S 115 5 

1 HIS 251 wr252 

4 PS\ 101, ANT 201 10 

AreaY 6 

l. PE 117 and I03or 106 

2 rhrec activity courses 

P Degree Requirements 

1. PSY 220, 312, 408, 410 and 411, 412 or 413 2^ 

2 Recommended selection of psychology courses 

; Foreign language sequence 1 5 

Elective Courses 10*25 

1. An appropriate minor or selected upper division courses 10-25 

D. Unspecified 

E. Regents 1 and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191-206 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of Psychology offers minors in the following five areas: 

A. Psvchologv — which requires 20 credit hours of upper division work. 

B. Mental Health— which requires PSY 316, 302, 315, 328, 406. 

C. Organizational Psvchologv — which requires five of the following: PSY 302, 315, 
320,321,322,406.' 

D. Anthropology — which requires 20 hours of upper division anthropology credits. 

E. Sociology — which requires SOC 201 and 20 credit hours of upper division work. 
All minor concentrations require a grade of "C" or better in each course taken. 

Anthropology Offerings 

ANT 201 Humankind & Culture (5-0-5) 

Each quarter. 

The nature, causes and prospects of being human. A study of the biocultural nature 

of humans and the development of societies from the preliterature beginnings 

through the rise of complex organization. Eligibility for ENG 101 is strongly 

recommended. 

ANT/PBH 207 Introduction to Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

The introductory archaeology course consists of a history of the field, bask 
techniques, theoretical underpinnings, and examples of field work from all types of 
excavation. It covers the range from early man to industrial and urban archaeology 
in a general fashion. Analysis is introduced along with survey techniques, preser- 
vation, reporting and other skills. (Identical with PBH 207.) 

ANT 302 Human Evolution (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand . 

This course examines the biological and cultural adaptations of the human species 
and its antecedents in a chronological fashion. Emphasis is placed on developing 
morphology and technology within the cultural framework. 






164 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ANT 305/ 

HIS 462 Americans Called Indians (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ANT 201. 

An investigation of the aboriginal cultures of North America from the Arctic to the 
Rio Grande. Study will include origins, distribution, ecology and interrelation- 
ships, past through present. 

ANT 310 Anthropology of Sex and Gender (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ANT 201; 

An examination of the cultural determinants of sex roles in selected world societies, 
past and present. The foci will be three anthropological analyses; economics and 
status; art and ritual; the structure of women's worlds. 

ANT 400 Sorcery, Demons and Gods (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Anthropological analysis of religion as a universal category of culture. The super- 
natural will be considered: Mother goddesses myth, sorcery, shamanism, sacrifice 
and totemism. Belief systems in their sociocultural contexts will be emphasized. 

ANT/PBH 401 Fieldwork In Historical Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of instructor or director. 

An introduction to and first application of archaeological methods to a specific field 

project. Excavation techniques, surveying and map making, data collecting and 

recording, archaeological photography, the identification and analysis of artifacts, 

and the interpretation of archaeological data will be presented in field and 

laboratory work as well as in lectures and readings. (Identical with PBH 551 .) (Under 

certain circumstances this course may be substituted in the Preservation Studies minor 

for PBH 598.) Course may be repeated for credit. 

ANT/PBH 402 Practicum In Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or director. 
The application of archaeological interpretative techniques to a specific site or 
analytical problem. Individual research projects in the interpretation of archaeologi- 
cal data and the conservation of artifactual finds with special attention to the care 
and storage of collections, display in the museum setting, and the presentation of 
archaeologically-derived information. (Identical with PBH 552.) 

ANT/PBH 455 Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans 

in the New World. Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post 

Medieval Archaeology as well as to the special areas of Industrial and Nautical 

Archaeology. Emphasis wall be given to anthropological archaeology's method and 

theory both as a perspective for the writing of history and as a component of 

Historic Preservation. (Identical with HIS 554). 

ANT/PBH 459 American Material Culture (4-2-5) 

Winter, 1994. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains of our society, past and 

present. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community 

and settlement patterns, diet, dress and disease are among the topics that will be 

discussed. 

ANT/PBH 480 Special Topics In Archaeology (V-V-[l-5]) 

Prerequisites: ANT/PBH 207, ANT/PBH 551 

The course is designed to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in archaeological techniques. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
archaeological graphics, faunal analysis (zooarchaeology ), conservation, or involve 
some off-campus archaeological experience. 






SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 165 



Economics Offerings 

t c o 201 Prindpltt nt \i.um i conomki (5-0-9) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite Eligibility for ENG 101 end MAI 101 
\ sur \ m of macro sconoinics, including basic economic concepts, national ii 
me monetarj iysten\ end the International economy 

Principles ot Micro Economics (5-0-5) 

Orreredonckmand Prerequisite Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAI 101 ECO201not 
■ prerequisite 

•\ surve) of micro ec o n o mi cs, im hiding the composition snd pricing oi national 
output un ernmenl and the market economy, lector pricing end Im ome distribu- 
tion and i comparison ol market systems 
Principles of Accounting I (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite Eligibility for MAI 101. 

An introduction to the fundamental prindplei and practicef o4 sccounting; me 
construction and interpretation of balance sheet and profit and loss itatements; the 
theory of debits and credits and their application to the sccounting pro* ess 

Principles of Accounting II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 20 V 

The application of accounting principles to specialized problems found in 
proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, with emphasis on cost accounting 
theory, modern methods of data processing, and the sources and applications of funds 

Multinational Economic Enterprises (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

Topics include how multinational economic enterprises have evolved over time, how 
they affect jobs and exports/imports in the U.S., and how they affect the economics 
of less developed countries. 

International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 

This course examines the economic importance and problems of international trade 
Topics include theories of international trade, the gains from trade, tariffs and non- 
tariff barrier to trade, U.S. commercial policy, economic integration and trade policies 
of developing countries. 

Economics of Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The study of governmental and corporate finance, with emphasis on fiscal and 

monetary policy. Open-market operations, discount policy, and the functions and 

problems associated with central banking will be examined and analyzed. 

Economics of Labor (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202. 

An introductory general survey of labor economics and labor relations. Organization 
and operation of American trade unionism, collective bargaining, economics of the 
labor market, wage theory and income distribution also among topics studied. 

Economic History of the United States (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

This course surveys the growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period 
since 1860. Developments in agriculture, industry, labor, transportation, and finance 
will be studied and analyzed. (Identical with HIS 363). 

International Law of Expropriation and Compensation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113. Corequisite: POS 326, "International Law," or permission of 
instructor. 

The course will examine the traditional Western view of the right of governments 
to expropriate foreign-owned property, and compare it to the views of many third- 
world and Marxist governments. Major takings of property owned by U.S. citizens and 
corporations will be highlighted. Arbitration and adjudication processes, as well as 
the role of the executive and legislative branches, will be examined. 



166 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ECO 431 International Financial Institutions (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or permission of instructor. 

This course analyzes international monetary relations. Topics include different 
exchange rate systems, the balance of payments, adjustment to balance of payments 
disequilibrium, and a survey of major international financial institutions, including 
IMF and the World Bank. Additional focus is on the role of central banks of the major 
countries in attempting to help stabilize the foreign exchange market. 

ECO 440 Seminar In Third World Economic Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or permission of instructor 

The developing areas and their prospect for economic betterment are studied in this 
course. Topics include different theories of underdevelopment, analyzing different 
techniques employed by various less developed countries for development, including 
import substitutions and export-led growth. Focus is also on problems facing the third 
world at the present time, such as Third World debt. 

ECO 441 Regional Economics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 320 or permission of instructor. 

Study of transnational labor and transportation economics and of international 
trade, posited in the regional context. Emphasis will be placed on such topics as the 
European Economic Community and the Caribbean Basin Initiative. The social and 
political, as well as economic consequences of migratory labor and permanent 
immigrant labor will be addressed. 

ECO 445 Comparative Economic Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of government and politics will 
be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 
men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with POS 445.) 

ECO 452/453 

/454 Internship (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. 
This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to relate academic 
understanding to an applied economic setting. Settings will include nonprofit agencies 
such as the Chamber of Commerce, as well as financial institutions and international 
businesses. This course will be jointly supervised by departmental instructors and 
agency officials. Transient students must have permission of the school dean at 
Armstrong and of the college which the student comes. 

Psychology Offerings 

PSY 101 General Psychology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of the science of behav- 
ior. Discussion and demonstrations assist in surveying all the areas of psychology. 
Psychology 101 is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. Eligibility for 
ENG 101 is strongly recommended. 

PSY 191 Honors General Psychology (2-35) 

Prerequisites: SAT verbal of at least 550. 

This course may be substituted for PSY 101 by qualified students. Course content is 
similar to PSY 101, but emphasis is on psychology as a laboratory science. Students 
will conduct a variety of experiments and demonstrations and will write research 
reports on these topics. 

PSY 201 Human Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A survey of lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive and 
social development. Understandings of growth and development are applied to 
classroom teaching and learning. Not recommended for Psychology majors. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 167 



Psycholog\ ot Parenting (5-0-5) 
Prerequiaiti PS\ 101 

A stiui\ of the psychological research .uul issues related to the family with .in 

amphaeJi i'ii child development parenting itylcf child ibusc dysfui 

tain i lii's and community raeOUN < >s Hum nursr can be used by the ( riminal Justu »• 

i raining ( enter program 

Introduction to Psychological Research U-2-S) 
PrtraquWtc PSY 101 

An Introduc tion to s,. ientifk methodology and its ipplk ition to bcJun i<>r analyaii 
Various ta Kniquej oi data collectioa and tin- statistical analyaii »>t sik h data .irr 
OBUjhaaixad 

Developmental Psychology (5-0-5) 
Prcrcouiaite PS\ 101. 

a itud) ol the origin and development of psychological proceaiei from the life apan 
per sp ec ti ve ["he effects of genetic/maturational and sockxulturel environmen- 
tal factors on the development of behavior throughout the life span are included 

Educational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite I*SY 101. Offered each quarter. 

The application oi behavioral science to the problem of learning in the classroom 

Primarily for teacher preparation. 

Psychological Testing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

Survey of individual and group tests in psychological, educational, and clinical 
settings. Course focuses on the theoretical and statistical principles that underlie 
psychological and educational measurement. Standardized psychological instru- 
ments are critically analyzed. Ethical issues in psychological testing are considered . 

Social Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the behavior of the 
individual. The cultural milieu and group pressures will be examined in terms of their 
effect on behavior. 

Fundamentals of Counseling and Psychotherapy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A survey of personality theories and the behavior changing techniques arising from 

them. The emphasis will be on learning theory and environmental influences. 

Perception (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 

The nature of perceptual processes will be explored through experiment and 

theoretical analysis. 

PSY 309 Physiological Psychology (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, BIO 101 and 102. 

The structure and function of the nervous system will be analyzed and related to 

behavior using lecture, slide presentations, and tissue. 

PSY 310 Psychology of Human Sexuality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An examination of the developmental, physiological, clinical and social aspects of 
human sexuality. The emphasis of the course will be on the various components of 
human sexuality from a developmental perspective. 

PSY 311 Theories of Personality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of selected personality theories with emphasis on normal behavior. 
Attention will be given to both experimental and clinical data. The determinants of 
personality structure and the development of personality will be examined from 
divergent points of view. 



168 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PSY 312 Measurement (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101, 220. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and validity techniques 

are discussed, using current psychological tests as examples. 

PSY 315 Psychology of Conflict and Stress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the interactions between physiological and psychological processes in the 
development and maintenance of stress related disorders. Emphasis is on environmen- 
tal factors and stress management techniques. 

PSY 316 Clinical Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A survey of behavioral problems, treatment modes, and theories. 

PSY 319 Animal Behavior (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The adaptations and behaviors with which living organisms cope with their 
environments will be studied through lecture and field work. Naturalistic observa- 
tion and experimental methods will be considered. 

PSY 320 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of applications of psychological principles to business and professional 

settings. Included are work motivation, goal setting, power politics, leadership and 

communication. 

PSY 321 Psychology of Work Behavior (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A psychological analysis of issues related to the individual worker in industry and 
organizations. Included are employee selection, training strategies, performance 
evaluation and job satisfaction. 

PSY 322 Psychology of Organizational Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

Psychological principles applied to interpersonal and intergroup relations, organi- 
zational leadership, management of organizational change relating to the social 
environment and communication systems. 

PSY 328 Abnormal Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the scientific and cultural bases of various conceptions of undesirable 

behavior. Application of principles derived from basic research will be emphasized . 

PSY 350 Cognitive Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the issues related to the various models of human information processing 
with an emphasis on perceptual and linguistic development. Principles and appli- 
cations derived from basic research will be included. 

PSY 375 The Psychology of Aging (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An analysis of the aging process as physical and biosocial change. Important 
adaptive aspects from health to economics will be considered with an emphasis on 
maintaining an optimal quality of life. 

PSY 406 Behavior Modification (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of proven methods of generating behavioral change, their empirical 

foundations and their applications in clinical, educational and social settings. 

PSY 408 Learning and Motivation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 

A study of the methodology and theory associated with the various forms of learning 
and their motivational concomitant. The laboratory will provide an introduction to 
animal care, training, and experimentation. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 169 



rs^ no Historj and System* ot Ptychologi (5 0-91 

Openonl) toPiycholog) majors orb) Invitation c4 the instna tor 
Prerequisite PSi 101 

Astiuh of thf tmh ideas in ps\v Kolog) from .-.it l\ .ininiiMii to mmlcr n Kh.iv h 1 
5pC< i.i I attention is k ;i\ en to the philosophic .1 1 b.isis .»t \ arious times in thr history 

of ps\ v holog) 

PSY 411 Senioi Seminar (5-0-5) 

i >p»«n only to icniof psyt holog) majon or in Invitation ol the profes 
\ PBtrlin^tnddJKiMikiiyTwipwtik hwiDconcenirateonseta tedcontemp 
in psychology Specific co n tent will vary from yeai to peai 

PSY 412 Senior Project (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite Senioi status 

Bach student will work with i (acuity member qualified in tin- student's si 
interest Work is to begin in the first quarter oi tin' senioi year (re gi st er for the 
quarter ol e xp ected completion). The Btudenl will produce .1 k holarly paper which 
must be scceptable to me departmental (acuity. 

PSY 413 Senior Internship (V-V-5) 

Prere q uisite; Senioi status 

students may petition the faculty to receive academic credit for an individually 
designed work experience in an applied setting. The sponsoring organization must 
providea qualified supervisor. A faculty advisor will establish pertormancecritena 
and evaluate accordingly. 

Sociology Offerings 

SOC 201 Introductory Sociology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the concepts and methods of the science of human group beha I lor 
Includes the study of socialization, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, and social 
institutions. It is designed to provide a better understanding of American society and 
social phenomena. Eligibility for ENG 101 is strongly recommended. 

SOC 315 The Family and Alternative Lifestyles (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A study of the institution which has major responsibility for socializing members of 

society. Consideration will be given to various forms and types of families. 

SOC 320 Ethnic minorities (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course focuses on the historical and /or contemporary realities of sub-cultural 
life in these United States, especially where skin color and language pose social and 
economic barriers. Examined are the cultural and structural factors which shape 
and inform the particular experiences of groups. It looks at dominant public 
institutions and patterns of response by minorities such as Black Americans, 
Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and other sizeable ethnic groups. 

SOC 333 Exploring Popular Culture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

An examination of popular culture using music, radio, television, texts, magazines, 

movies, technology and language to explore a given era. Comparisons will be made 

of lifestyles, sex roles, racial attitudes and the national regional mood of times 

examined. 

SOC 340 Methods of Social Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course will explore several methods of applied social research including case 
studies, record research, experimental designs, surveys, observation and systems 
interaction as they apply to social data. The student must demonstrate a working 
knowledge of each method in the context of social work practice. 






170 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SOC 350 Social Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course is an examination of deviant behavior, normalcy, and the differences 

between social ideals and social realities in the context of sociological theory. 

SOC 430 Alcohol and Drug Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A course focusing on the various forms of alcohol and drug abuse with emphasis 
on the stages of harmful dependence and addiction. There will be an examination 
of the legal and social implications of addiction as well as approaches to treatment 
and rehabilitation. 

SOC 450 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of Arts, Sciences and Education at Armstrong. 






~ '-..> 



**** 




1 72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

School of Health Professions 

Repella, James, Dean 

Connor, Sara, Assistant to the Dean 

Goals and Objectives 

The faculty of the School of Health Professions believes that the development of the 
student as an individual is a primary objective of a college education. The central role and 
function of the School of Health Professions is to provide an appropriate academic, 
intellectual, and professional milieu to develop the skills required for a high level of 
professional competence. This includes the development of intellectual and physical 
competencies; personal values and beliefs; leadership abilities; a sense of integrity, self- 
worth, and self- reliance; and a sense of responsibility toward the community and society. 
To achieve these objectives, the goals of the School are: 

To prepare graduates who possess, at the appropriate level, the competencies re- 
quired in their professional endeavors, and whose practice is compatible with the ethics 
of democratic humanistic philosophy; 

To prepare an educational environment which will motivate the student to develop a 
life-long commitment to learning and services; stimulate creativity, flexibility, and 
independence of thought and judgement within acceptable professional and humanistic 
constraints; and foster appreciation for scholarship and critical reasoning; 

To develop the leadership abilities of students so they may function effectively as 
leaders both in their professions and in their communities; To anticipate and to identify 
problems and needs and to encourage change and open-mindedness in finding solutions 
through appropriate research. 

To develop the School as a planning and resource center for professional growth and 
community service; 

To complement other Schools of the College by providing programs of a uniquely 
professional character which enhance the educational opportunities of Armstrong State 
College. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Health Professions includes the departments of Associate Degree 
Nursing; Baccalaureate Degree Nursing; Dental Hygiene; Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, Respiratory Therapy; and the degree programs in Health Science, Medical 
Technology and Radiologic Technologies. 

The following degree programs are offered within the School: 
Associate in Science in: 
Dental Hygiene 
Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies 
Respiratory Therapy 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Dental Hygiene Education 
Medical Technology 
Nursing 
Additional degree programs, those at the masters level, are delineated in the 
graduate section of this catalog. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 173 



Associate Degree Nursing 
Faculty 

Cross IVanna I Vpai tment Head 

Caldwell I \ .1 Reilly, Naiu \ 

Clark. Sandra Titus, Elizabeth 

Connor Sara Williamson, fane 

pruden* Ethel 

The Associate Degree Nursing Pro gra m provides the student with the opp o rtunity to 
obtain a general education and to study nursing at the college level. rhe program is 
approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing and accredited by the National League tor 
Nursing (NLN). Graduates are eligible to take the National CotUU ll of State Hoards ot 
Nursing 1 icensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) for licensure to practice as Registered 
Nurses C Iraduates must meet all legal requirements for licensure as established by the 
State Board ot Nursing. Student nurses participate in nursing clinical experiences at local 
hospitals And other community agencies and are responsible for providing their own 
transportation. 

The Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements 

The Georgia Board of Nursing has the authority to refuse to grant a license to an 
applicant upon a finding by the board that the applicant has been convicted of any 
felony, crime involving moral turpitude, or crime violating a federal or state law 
relating to controlled substances or dangerous drugs in the courts of this state, any 
other state, territory, or country, or in the courts of the United States, including but 
not limited to a plea of nolo contendere entered to the charge. 

Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Associate Degree Nursing Program, the following must 
be maintained: 

1. Natural science courses (CHE 201; ZOO 208, ZOO 209, BIO 210) (See "Limits on 
Admission to Health Professions Programs, #3" in the "Admissions" section of 
this catalog for the policy regarding the repeat of science courses.) 

a. A grade of C or above is required for ZOO 208 and 209. 

b. A grade of D or above is required for CHE 201 and BIO 210. Only one D will 
be allowed. 

2. Nursing courses: 

a. A grade of C or above is required in each nursing course. 

b. A student who must repeat a course will be subject to availability of space in 
the subsequent course. 

c. Only one repeat in a nursing course will be allowed. A student who fails a 
nursing course may repeat this course. An additional failure in this nursing 
course or any other nursing course will result in dismissal and the student 
will be ineligible for readmission to the program. 

3. Grade Point Average: 

An overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required to remain in the 
program. 

4. Regents' Exam 

All students must have passed the Regents' Exam before entering their last 
nursing course. 

5. CPR Certification 

All students are required to be certified in Basic Life Support (adult and child) 
prior to entering NUR 210. 



1 74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Insurance 

To meet contractual obligations with the cooperating clinical agencies, the Department 
requires students to submit a completed health history and evidence of hospitalization 
insurance prior to the first day of class. Once admitted, all students must obtain nursing 
liability insurance. Nursing liability and hospitalization insurance must remain current 
throughout the program. 

Advanced Placement 

The first two nursing courses, Nursing 110 and 111, may be exempted by one 
examination with credit awarded. Medical corpsmen and licensed practical nurses who 
have graduated and /or practiced in a clinical setting within the past two years are eligible 
to sit for this examination. Proof of the above is required. The examination may be taken 
only once. Students who successfully challenge Nursing 110 and 111 are eligible to enter 
NUR 114. They will also be required to take NUR 113, and complete all prerequisite 
courses. Successful completion of the examination does not guarantee admission into the 
program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE 
IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG101,102 10 

Area II 25 

1. ZOO 208, 209 10 

2. BIO 210, CHE 201 10 

3. MAT 101 5 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POS113 5 

3. PSY101 5 

Area IV 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 and one activity course or three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 55 

1. NUR 110,111,114,113, (for advanced placement students only) 

210, 211, 212, 213 55 

C. Regents' and National Standardized Nursing Examinations 

TOTAL 108 

Curriculum Design 

Prerequisites 

ZOO 208 5 

CHE 201 5 

MAT 101 5 

15 
1st Quarter 

NUR 110 6 

ZOO 209 5 

ENG101 5 

16 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 175 



2nd Quarter 
\l R 111 
BIO 210 

1 v 

17 
3rd Quarter 

\l R 111 

PS\ 101 5 

n 117 or 166 2 

•NIK 113 (2) 

15(17) 
4th Quarter 

NUR 210 8 

HE 251 or 252 5 

PEAcnvrn 1 

14 
5th or 6th Quarter 

NUR211 11 

POS 113 5 

16 
5th or 6th Quarter 

NUR 212 9 

\L R213 6 



15 
*For Advanced Placement Students Only 

OFFERINGS 

NUR 110* Nursing to Meet Basic Needs I (3-9-6) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: Admission to the nursing program, ZOO 208, CHE 
201, MAT 101, eligibility for ENG 101. Corequisite: ZOO 209. 
This course introduces the conceptual framework of the nursing program with 
emphasis on basic human needs, growth and development, biopsychosocial man, 
teaching/ learning and roles of the nurse. The nursing process is used to promote 
adaptation with problems related to hygiene, activity/exercise, safety, elimina- 
tion, oxygenation, nutrition and sexuality. Principles of pharmacology and 
administration of non-parenteral medications are presented. Concurrent clinical 
learning experiences are provided in extended care facilities and acute care hospitals. 

NUR 111* Nursing to Meet Basic Needs II (3-12-7) 

Fall, Winter Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 110, ZOO 209. Corequisite: BIO 210. 
A continuation of \UR 1 1 0. This course introduces fluid /electrolytes, rest /comfort, 
emotional safety, love/belonging and self-esteem. The nursing process is used for 
patients undergoing surgery with emphasis upon nursing skills, patient teaching and 
interpersonal relationships. Concurrent! clinical learning experiences are provided 
in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 113* Transition to Associate Degree Nursing (2-0-2) 

Offered on Demand. Prerequisites: Successful Exemption of NUR 110 and 111. 
Corequisite: BIO 210. 

This course is designed for the advanced placement student. Content includes 
review of dosage calculation and introduction to the conceptual framework with 
emphasis on nursing process, roles of the AD nurse, growth and development, 
communication and teaching/learning. 



176 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NUR 114* Concepts of Adult Nursing I (5-9-8) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 111, Co-requisite: PSY 101. 
Basic human needs are evolved into the concepts of oxygenation, metabolism, and 
perception/coordination. These concepts focus on common health problems in which 
there is a maladaptive response of the body's ability to meet its oxygen, nutritional, 
elimination, and activity needs. Physical assessment skills are included. 

NUR 210* Concepts of Adult Nursing II (5-9-8) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 114. Corequisite: HIS 251/252. 
The second quarter of study of the physically ill adult. Basic human needs are 
evolved into the concepts of inflammation/immunity, perception/ coordination and 
metabolism. These concepts focus on common health problems in which there is a 
maladaptive response of the body's ability to protect itself from physiological harm 
or meet metabolic and sensory needs. Rehabilitative aspects of care expand the 
provider and teacher roles. 

NUR 211* Concepts of Advanced Nursing (5-18-11) 

Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: NUR 210 Corequisite: POS 113. 
The third quarter of study of the physically ill adult. The concepts of oxygenation, 
metabolism, inflammation / immunity and perception / coordination provide the basis 
for study of the critical care aspects of nursing. The student develops beginning skills 
as coordinator of care for patients with multiple needs. Transition from the role of 
student to practitioner, leadership skills and trends/ issues are emphasized. Concur- 
rent clinical learning experiences are provided in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 212* Nursing in the Maternal-Child Continuum (6-9-9) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. Corequisite: NUR 213. 
This course concentrates on the experience of the childbearing family /developing 
child as they impact upon the health care system. Emphasized is the use of the nursing 
process to promote adaptation during the stages of childbearing and into the life cycle 
from birth through adolescence. The teaching/ learning interaction and developmen- 
tal appropriateness of care are additional foci. Concurrent clinical learning experiences 
are provided on maternity and pediatric units in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 213* Mental Health-Psychiatric Nursing (3-9-6) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. Corequisite: NUR 213. 
This course focuses on the development of self-awareness and on the therapeutic 
use of self in assisting man to achieve mental health. The nursing process is used for 
the patient with problems of psychosocial adaptation. Examined are therapeutic 
communication skills, teaching/learning, developmental level and the roles of the 
psychiatric nurse. Concurrent clinical learning experiences are provided in a 
variety of community/mental health facilities. 

* Course cycle is under review and is subject to change. 

Baccalaureate Degree Nursing 

Faculty 

* Buck, Marilyn, Department Head 

Conway, Marian Powell, Catharine 

Dutko, Kathy * Repella, James 

Hart, Marcella * Roesel, Rosalyn 
Keller, Carola Silcox, Elaine 

Levett, Nettie Stern, Camille 

Massey, Carole Taggart, Helen 

Miller, Mary Talley, Brenda 

Neuman, Bonnie 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Armstrong State College Department of Baccalaureate Nursing offers entering 
freshmen, transfer students, and Registered Nurses the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing Degree. The American Nurses Association (ANA) and the National 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 177 






I eague t v >i Nursing (NLN) tun e adopted a position statement calling for the ba< calauie 
pee in nursing as tin' academi< preparation foi professional nursing practice 
c Graduates are prepared to provide < omprehensive nursing care fn people in a variety o( 
settings I he i* sN * degree also provides the foundation for graduate education in nursing 
I in- p r o gra m Is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing and is fully accredited bj 
the National i eague km Nursing (Nl N) ( iraduates who arc no( already RNa must meet 
all legal requirements tor licensure as established by the State Board oi Nursing in ordei 
to be eligible to take the National ( ouncil l icensure Examination (N< I EX i<\» tor 
licensure a- •> Registered Nurse I RN) 

The Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements 

rhe Georgia Board oi Nursing has the authority to refuse to grant <i license to an 
applicant upon .1 finding by the hoard th.it theappli< ant has been 1 onvi< ted o( any felony, 
crime Involving moral turpitude, or crime violating a federal or state law relating to 
controlled substances or dangerous drugs in the courts 0! this state, am other state. 
territory, or country, or in the courts of the United states, including but not limited to a 

plea ot nolo contendere entered to the charge. 

Progression Requirements 

For the generic Bachelor of Science program: 

1. A "C" or better must be earned in each science course (see School of Health 
Professions pohev regarding repeat of science courses, p. 33). 

2. A "C" or better must be earned in each nursing course. 

3. Students who earn less than a "C" in a nursing course must apply tor readmission 
to the nursing major. If readmitted, the course may be repeated at its next offering 
on a space available basis. This course may be taken concurrently with a non- 
sequential course. No more than one nursing course may be repeated. 

4. An overall grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required to remain in the nursing 
program. 

5. Students must maintain a current health history record throughout the program. 

6. Liability, CPR certification and health insurance must be maintained while in 
program. 

7. The Registered Nurse may validate BSN 310, 334, 335, 350, 422, 423 through 
written examinations. No more than one-fourth of the degree requirements may 
be taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. All required science 
courses must be completed before enrollment in BSN 433 and /or BSN 436. (For 
further information see BSN Department) 

8. All students must have passed the Regents Exam before entering their last 
quarter. 

9. If a student does not matriculate each quarter, excluding Summer Quarter, the 
student must apply for readmission to the College and to the Department, (see 
Readmission page 35) 

10. Failure to comply with any of the above requirements while in the nursing 
program constitutes grounds for dismissal from the program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201; ENG 222 5 

Area II 20 

1. CHE 121, 122* 10 

2. MAT 101, 220 10 



178 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area III 25 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

3. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 210; PSY 295; SOC 201; ZOO 208, 209, 215 30 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 or 166 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 82 

1. BSN 231, 310, 320, 334, 335, 336 or 339, 340, 350, 422, 423, 432, 433, 436 77 

C. Courses in Allied Fields 10 

1. Electives 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examination 

Total 193 
*Students who have already completed an approved Area II lab science sequence may 
take CHE 201 to meet the prerequisite for ZOO 208. 

Curriculum Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall 

ENG101 5 

CHE 121 5 

MAT 101 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

ENG102orl92 5 

CHE 122 5 

HIS 114 or 191 5 

PE 103 or 108 1 

16 
Spring 

ENG201or292 5 

HIS 115 or 192 5 

ZOO 208 5 

PE 117 or 166 2 

17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall 

PSY 101 5 

ZOO 209 5 

Area I Elective 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

BIO 210 5 

MAT 220 5 

SOC 201 5 

PE .^t 

16 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 179 



Spring 

im 295 

BSN 231 

ZOO 215 5 

15 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall 

BSN 310 7 

BSN 320 5 

Tol.Sci./Am His 5 

17 
Winter 

"BSN 334 6 

BSN 340 5 

Elective, or 5 

"BSN 335 6 

16or 17 
Spring 

BSN 336 or BSN 339 3 

"BSN 350 or BSN 423 6 

"BSN 335, or 6 

Elective 5 

14or 15 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall 

"BSN 350 or BSN 423 6 

"BSN 422 6 

BSN 432 or 

Elective 5 

17 
Winter 

BSN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

Elective or BSN 432 5 

15 or 17 
Spring 

BSN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

lOor 12 

*By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States History 
and Government and Georgia History and Government. Students at Armstrong State 
College may demonstrate such proficiency by successfully completing examinations for 
which credit will be awarded for Political Science 1 13 and History 251 or 252. If students 
elect to take courses instead of challenging them, students will be responsible for 
arranging their schedules to complete both of the courses before graduation. 

"Although clinical laboratory hours are computed on the basis of 6 hours per week; 
actual clinical laboratory hours are 12 hours every other week. 



180 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



OFFERINGS 

BSN 231 A Conceptual Framework for Professional Nursing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101, SOC 201. 

This course is designed for beginning students of professional nursing. The concep- 
tual framework of the baccalaureate curriculum is examined. Major emphasis is 
placed on an introduction to the concepts of Person, Environment, Health, and 
Nursing. 

BSN 310 Concepts of Nursing Practice (4-9-7) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231, PSY 295, all required science courses. 
This introductory course provides the foundational knowledge for clinical nursing. 
Emphasis is placed on concepts for professional nursing practice that will assist 
individuals to meet health needs. The student assumes the role of professional 
nurse by implementing various cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills to 
promote positive adaptation. 

BSN 320 Health Appraisal of the Individual (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 215, BSN 231 or permission of department head. 
This is a beginning course in physical assessment which provides knowledge and 
experience for the nursing student and interested health professional, with a focus 
on appraisal of the individual throughout the lifecycle. Emphasis is placed upon 
understanding of physical assessment skills appropriate for nursing. Course didac- 
tic and laboratory components focus on normal findings of the physical appraisal 
and common deviations from normal are addressed as necessary. 

BSN 334 Health Restoration of Adults I** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310, 320. 

This course provides students with the opportunity to assist adult individuals cope 
with alterations in the ability to meet human needs related to the concepts of 
oxygenation, fluid and electrolytes, perception and coordination, and metabolism. 
Clinical experiences are provided in secondary health care settings. 

BSN 335 Promotion of Psychosocial Adaptation** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 310, 320. 

This course is designed to assist students to promote positive adaptive behavior of 
individuals and families with psychosocial problems through the use of the nursing 
process. Trends in mental health, legal issues and the role of the nurse in the 
psychiatric setting are examined. Clinical experiences are provided in secondary 
health care settings and community mental health facilities. 

BSN 336 Leadership In Nursing Care Management (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310. 

Management and leadership principles are introduced and applied to nursing. The 
focus of this course is on the leadership role of the professional nurse in the 
management of health care. 

BSN 339 Topics In Professional Nursing (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231 and RN licensure 

This course builds upon BSN 231. Major emphasis is placed on the discussion and 
application of selected concepts and theories that underlie the practice of profes- 
sional nursing. 

BSN 340 Nursing and Family Health (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310 or permission of department head. 

This course is designed to explore the family as a biopsychosocial unit of a multi- 
cultural society. Internal and external variables affecting the health and adaptation 
of the family system are considered. The nursing process is utilized as a framework 
to assess structural and functional needs, plan nursing interventions, and develop 
outcome criteria. 

BSN 350 Nursing and the Childbearing Family** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 334, 340. 

Using the developmental approach, this course focuses on health promotion and 
restoration of the childbearing family. The nursing process is utilized to assess 
health needs and promote positive adaptation. Clinical learning experiences are 
provided in a variety of settings. 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 181 



Health Restoration of Adults II" (4i> 6) 
Prerequisite! BSN 6 140 lenioi status 

I his course provides Student! With the ODportu nit \ to assume a beginning lr.ni.r 

ihiprolein tin- msnsgemenl ol nursing ore of sdult individuals and their families 

m ho ire experieiu Ing maladaptive responses related to complex ilterations In the 

sbility to meet bask human needs ( links] experieiv es •> r«- provided In iei < »nJ.ir \ 

health t ire lettingi 

Health Restoration ot the Child** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites BSN MO 134 

I he student uses the nut sun; pro< ess ,is .i problem solving epproaj h in tin- «. «i r«- <>t 

children experieiu Ingslterstions In theii ibility to meet humsn needs from Intern y 

to jdo lc s c e n ce C links! experiences ire provided In secondary care end i<>mmu- 

nity settings 

Nursing Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites rhree clinicsl Nursing courses snd MAT 220. 

I his course rbcuseson tin- research process trom problem identification to commu- 
nication ol results. The evolution of nursing research is examined. The role that 
clinical nursing rest-arch plays in the improvement of the quality of care is empha- 
sized 

Nursing and Community Health (5-15-10) 
Prerequisites: BSN 320, 340, J50, 422, 423. 

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and opportunity 
to utilize the nursing process to assist clients to attain their maximum level of 
wellness through the promotion and maintenance of health and the prevention of 
disease. The student functions as a beginning member of the interdisciplinary 
health care team to plan and provide comprehensive nursing care in selected 
community settings. 

Professional Nursing Practicum (4-24-12) 
Prerequisites: BSN 320, 340, 350, 422, 423 

This course provides the opportunity for students to synthesize knowledge from 
the liberal arts, sciences, and nursing as a basis for professional nursing practice. 
Students practice the leadership role of the professional nurse in assessing, plan- 
ning, implementing and evaluating nursing care in a selected clinical setting. 
Seminar sessions are provided for students to share experiences and to discuss 
trends and issues which influence change in professional nursing practice. 

Issues In Gerontological Nursing (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 201, BSN 310, or permission of department. 
Application of the nursing process to the older adult population is the focus of this 
course. The emphasis is on promotion of health among the population in order to 
foster successful aging through positive adaptation. The student will explore 
nursing strategies which promote the health of older adults. 

Health Restoration of Individuals and Families Experiencing Critical 
Illness (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 422 or permission of department head. 

This course provides the opportunity for students to synthesize knowledge from 
the liberal arts, sciences, and nursing to assist in the promotion of positive adapta- 
tion of individuals and families experiencing multisystem failure. Critical thinking 
and problem solving opportunities from a nursing perspective are provided in 
selected critical care settings. 

Independent Study (V-V-ll-3]) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of BSN department. 

The student, in consultation with the professor, will select the topic for supervised 

independent study. The student will submit an independent study proposal prior 

to the quarter in which the course is to be taken. 



182 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Dental Hygiene 

Faculty 

* Tanenbaum, Barbara, Department Head 

Coursey, Teresa 
Edenfield, Suzanne 
Mengle, Janice 

* Graduate Faculty 

The mission of the dental hygiene programs is to educate dental hygiene graduates 
who demonstrate competent clinical skills, effective communication skills, respect for the 
dental team, and professional and ethical standards in providing complete dental 
hygiene patient care. During the educational process, the program fosters the develop- 
ment of life long learning with faculty that are current in academic and clinical knowledge. 

Departmental Goals 

1. Graduate qualified dental hygienists who can demonstrate competent clinical skills. 

2. Develop dental hygienists with respect for the dental team who possess high ethical 
and professional standards. 

3. Provide students with faculty that have current skills and knowledge and who 
communicate that knowledge with appropriate instructional methodology. 

4. Integrate academic knowledge from general education, biomedical sciences, dental 
sciences, and dental hygiene sciences into practical application. 

5. Develop effective communication skills to disseminate preventive dental health 
education in the clinical setting and in the community. 

6. Strive to provide state of the art equipment and resources that reflect the newest 
technology. 

7. Provide a mechanism for ongoing evaluation of program goals and objectives. 

8. Recruit motivated students that will matriculate through the degree programs with 
sensitivity to diversity. 

9. Promote an interest in life long learning through development of critical thinking and 
research skills to become an effective change agent. 

The student must complete a curriculum of 120 quarter hours for the two-year 
program leading to the Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene. Dental hygienists 
provide dental health services in private dental offices, civil service positions, industry, 
and in various public health fields. They practice under the supervision of a dentist and 
must pass a national and a regional or state board examination for licensure. The 
curriculum is fully approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association. 

Progression Requirements 

1 . The student must earn a "C" or better in each Dental Hygiene course before registering 
for subsequent dental hygiene courses; there, a grade of "C" or better in the previous 
course(s) is a prerequisite for each dental hygiene course for which the student 
registers after the first quarter of the first year. 

2. A passing grade in all related natural science courses is a prerequisite to the 200 level 
Dental hygiene courses; therefore, CHE 201, ZOO 208-209, and BIO 210 must be 
satisfactorily completed before the student will be admitted into second-year status in 
the Dental Hygiene Program. See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions 
Programs," in the "Admissions" section of this catalog for the policy regarding the 
repeat of science courses. 

3. Challenge examinations for specific dental hygiene subject areas are available in the 
department. Contact the Department for information. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 183 



Audited ind 01 r epe ated coursework ma\ sired i student's academic progress m 

relation to the requirements tor tmaiu ilJ lid In addition, federal assistant e and VA 

educational benef its will not be paid tor tudited tnd m repeated i o ur seworfc 

ah students mutt Bubmifl s complete health history form, ts idenoe of health kntui 

tnoe and t\ klenceoJ liability (malpractice) Insurance prior topartfc IpatJon in clinical 

experiences 

Students must obtain CPR certification prior to the tirst clinical e xp erience 

' All students must have paased the Regents' Exam before entering their last quarter 

8. An overall GPA oi 2.0 Is required tor graduation, 

The B ach e l or of Science In Dental I [ygiene Education Program Is designed tor the post 

associate degree registered dental hygienist Students may *. hoose to enter the program 

as a tull or part-time Student allowing tor flexibility Oi class and work schedules The 
program is comprised ot preparatory courses that will enable the student to be employed 
in areas such as dental hygiene and dental assisting instruction, dental health education 
in public school systems, and public health. The student will work directly with the 
dental hygiene faculty and participate in the student teaching practicums in various 
associate degree classes, clinics, laboratories, and extra-mural facilities. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN 
SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 48 

Area 1 15 

1. ENG 101, 102; or 192 10 

2. DRS228 5 

Area II 5 

1. MAT 101 3 

Area III 20 

1. PSY101 5 

2. SOC201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. POS113 5 

Area IV 5 

1. CHE 201 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 2 

2. One activity course 1 

B. Courses in the Major Field 57 

1. DH 111 , 112, 113, 118, 120, 122, 123, 125, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 221, 

222, 223, 225, 228 57 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 120 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 91 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. PHI 201 5 

Area II 10 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 



184 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area III 25 

1. SOC201 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 and 114 or 191, 115 or 192 15 

3. POS113 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. CHE 121, 122 10 

3. DRS228 5 

4. PSY101 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 77 

1. DH 111, 112, 113, 118, 120, 122, 123, 125, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 221, 

222,223, 225,228 57 

2 DH 401, 402, 403, 404 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 35 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201, PSY 295 10 

3. EDN 200, EDN 335 10 

4. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 203 
OFFERINGS 

DH 111 Clinical Dental Hygiene I (2-6-4) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the dental hygiene profession. 
The subject matter includes fundamental knowledge of clinical procedures and 
techniques of removing deposits from the teeth. Clinical procedures are introduced 
on the manikins and the student is required to practice these techniques until 
proficiency is achieved. 

DH 112 Clinical Dental Hygiene II (2-6-4) 

Prerequisite: DH 111. 

The student further develops clinical skills by performing instrumentation proce- 
dures on classmates. Additionally, the student performs oral prophylactic techniques 
on patients in the clinic under supervision. The subject matter includes procedures 
which the hygienist will use in the performance of clinical duties. The student 
applies acquired knowledge in clinical situations. 

DH 113 Clinical Dental Hygiene III (1-9-4) 

Spring 

Prerequisite: DH 112. 

Students continue with oral prophylactic techniques on patients in the clinic under 

supervision. The subject matter includes material which the student will integrate 

into the performance of clinical procedures. 

DH 118 Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

The basic principles of periodontal health and disease in relation to the total health 
of the patient are presented in this course. Concepts of etiology and periodontal 
pathology are considered. Periodontal knowledge is applied in the clinical experi- 
ence. 

DH 120 Dental Roentgenology (2-3-3) 

Winter. 

This course will include a series of lectures, demonstrations, and directed labora- 
tory experience in the fundamentals of dental radiology. Intraoral and extraoral 
techniques for the taking and processing of radiographs are taught. Clinical time in 
subsequent quarters will afford the application of these principles. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 1«5 



dm 122 Head and Neck taatoaij U U 

(..it 

lhis cour>e is designed lo tamiltai i/r (In- dental hyj Icnl Mfith gross 

anatomical relationships in the head and i* emphasis is given '" ,r, » - 

analom) or the oral cavit) and its clinical application 

DH 123 Dental Anatonn Old Oral HJllOlOgJ I I 

Pall 

rhia course is designed to familiarize tin- dental hygiene student Mfith th«- nomen 
dature, morpholog) eruption sequence oi tin- primar) and secondar) dentition 
and oral histolog) and embryology ol the oral i .o> it\ 

DH 125 Genoa] and Oral Patholog) (2-0-2) 

Spring 

I his course is de sig ned to familiarize dental hygiene students with tin- principlei ol 
general pathology in relation to the com m on oral diseases Emphasis is pl.t 
chnkal m anlfcataUu ne and the imp o rtan ce of earty r ecog ni tion of abnormal conditions 

DH 211/212 

213 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV, V, VI (2-12-6) (2-12-6) (1-15-6) 

Rail Winter and Spring re s pectively Prerequisites DH 1 1 l.i 12. 1 1 1 
rhesecoursesarea continuation of me p r ece d ing clinic a l co urs e s Emphasis osnteii 
on the students .ul\ ancement and improved proficiency in all areas of i teor kin g 
clinic Students are supervised and evaluated on all clinical procedures using ■ 

Seauenced level Oi difficulty to determine competency of Clinical skills as well as 

assimilation ot didactic knowledge into clinical arenas Lecture time is devoted to 

pertinent material related to the dental hygiene profession and discussion of 
experiences encountered in clinical situations 

DH 214 Anesthesiology and Pharmacology (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with drugs and anesthetics with 
particular emphasis on those used in dentistry. The subject matter will include 
origin, physical and chemical properties, preparation, modes of administration 
and effec ta upon the body systems. The fundamentals of prescription writing will 
be introduced. 

DH 216 Dental Public Health (3-0-3) 

Winter. 

This course introduces the student to the various aspects of public health with 
reference to the dental needs of the community. The distribution o( dental disease 
and current public health trends are considered. Epidemiology and interpretation 
of data related to community dental health programs are emphasized. Directed 
field experience is included. 

DH 221 Scopes of Dental Hygiene Practice (1-0-1) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to acquaint students with various scopes of dental hygiene 
practice, the jurisprudence governing the practice of dental hygiene, and the 
structure and function of professional associations. 

DH 222 Dental Materials (2-3-3) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the 
chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of dental materials. The indications 
and limitations of materials are stressed as well as proper manipulation of those 
materials used by dental hygienists. The principles of dental materials utilization 
are presented and applied during the clinical experience. 

DH 223 Applied Nutrition (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

This course presents the aspects of nutrition as applied to the practice of dentistry. 
The course acquaints the student with nutrition education as an integral component 
of the duties and functions of a dental hygienist. 



186 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DH 225 Preventive Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

The emphasis of this course is the prevention of periodontal diseases. Many facets 
of preventive periodontics are included with emphasis on mechanical and chemical 
plaque control measures and patient motivation. Various aspects of periodontal 
diseases are presented. Treatment planning and case presentations allow the 
synthesis of knowledge which is applied in the clinical experience. 

DH 228 Dental Health Education (1-3-2) 

Winter. 

The student is familiarized with the practical application of modern methods of 
dental health education. Course content includes development of teaching materi- 
als for dental health education demonstrations, presentation of materials, and field 
experiences. 

DH 401 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education I (3-6-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Education Program. 
This course is an introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene clinic, 
community agencies, and patient care facilities with emphasis on observation, 
individual and small group teaching, and teacher aide work. The first professional 
course for majors in Dental Hygiene Education. 

DH 402 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education II (3-6-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 401. 

This course is a continuation of Dental Hygiene 401. Problems common to begin- 
ning dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed to accomplish 
program objectives, establishment and organization of content, methods of evalu- 
ation and supervision in the dental hygiene clinic are included. 

DH 403 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education III (3-6-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 402. 

This course is an advanced field experience designed to assist the student in the 
development of learning activities, teaching procedures, and the presentation of 
materials pertinent to dental hygiene education. The student will develop and teach 
selected units in the basic dental hygiene sequence at community agencies, and 
patient care facilities. 

DH 404 Directed and Individual Study (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a directed individual study in an area of major interest with emphasis 
relevant to dental hygiene and future career objectives. Scientific research and 
evaluation methods will be reviewed and used in the student's individual project. 



HEALTH SCIENCE 187 



Health Science 

Faculty 

• Simon Emma ( oordinator 

Kenned) Robert 

iter, |amef Graduate Program Director 

luate I acuity 

tlie overall mission oi the Bachelor o( i lealth Sclera e program is to make available an 
bdu< itional op p ortunity tor persona intere s ted In entering i health BekJ and an m ademk 
brogram tor e xp erienced health p r o fessi onals who wish to further their i areer opportu- 
nities More specifically, the objectives ol the program are 

l. fo prepare students with the knowledge thai behavioral change can occur through 

education. 
2 To prepare students to toster health, health promotion, and disease prevention, 
) [*0 provide the Oppor t unity tor students to gain expertise in the health related areas 
ot education health education, administration, nursing and allied health profes- 
sions, computer science, or health and fitness management. 
The emphasis of the curriculum is to view "health" as different from "illness" and to 
leach new students and practicing health professionals of this difference. The curriculum 
will permit the student to earn a baccalaureate degree that reflects expertise in health 
science while focusing on an applied health related area. Upon graduation, these health 
professionals will implement the concepts they have learned and direct the efforts of the 
American public in the promotion, enhancement, and maintenance of health and in the 
prevention of health problems. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
HEALTH SCIENCE 

General Requirements (96 hours) 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; ENG 222; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. One of the following laboratory science sequences: 10 

BIO 101, 102 or 111, 112 

CHE 121, 122 
CHE 128, 129 
PHY 211, 212 

2. MAT 101 and 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114,115 Or 191, 192 10 

2. POS113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HS100 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. PSY101 5 

4. PEM252 5 

5. CS115 5 

6. DRS228 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE166 2 



188 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2. PE101 1 

3. PE 103 or 108 1 

4. Two activity courses 2 

Health Science Core (45 hours) 

HS 300 - Health Problems in a Changing Society 5 

HS 350 - Health in the Community 5 

HS 420- Nutrition 5 

HS 440 - Health Planning and Evaluation 5 

HS 445 - Seminar in Health Science 5 

HS 450 - Health Science Practicum 5 

HS 480 - Epidemiology 5 

PSY 220 - Introduction to Psychological Research 5 

PEM 352 - Physiology of Exercise 5 

Emphasis Areas (55 hours) (Student will choose one emphasis area) 

Emphasis Area A: Health Promotion and Health Education (55 hours) 

HE 261 - Health and Sex Education 3 

HE 262 - Health and Drug Education 2 

HE 301 - Marketing Health 5 

HE 360 - School Health Education 3 

HE 420 - Health Education and Rehabilitation 5 

HE 200 - Health and Human Development 1 5 

HE 201 - Health and Human Development II 5 

EDN 240 - Educational Media 2 

PSY 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

PSY 315 - Conflict and Stress 5 

PSY 406 - Behavior Modification 5 

(2) Electives 10 

Emphasis Area B: Administration (55 hours) 

HE 301 - Marketing Health 5 

HS 200 - Health and Human Development I 5 

HS 201 - Health and Human Development II 5 

ENG 372 - Technical and Business Communication 5 

PSY 321 - Psychology of Work Behavior 5 

PSY 406 - Behavior Modification 5 

BAD 362 - Organizational Theory and Behavior 5 

2 Courses from: 10 

PA/POS 303 - Foundation of Public Administration or 
POS 401 - Politics of the Budgetary Process or 
POS 403 - Public Policy Development or 
POS 418 - Administrative Law 
(2) Electives 10 

Emphasis Area C: Health & Fitness Management (55 hours) 

HS 200 - Health and Human Development I 5 

HS 201 - Health and Human Development II 5 

HS 452 - Health /Fitness Practicum 5 

HE 301 - Marketing Health 5 

HE 420 - Health Education in Rehabilitation 5 

PSY 315 - Conflict and Stress 5 

PSY 320 - Industrial Organizational Psychology 5 

PSY 406 - Behavior Modification 5 

BAD 362 - Organizational Theorv and Behavior 5 

(2) Electives 10 



HEALTH SCIENCE 



Empht D Nursing A Mlied Health Professio ura) 

\ ort) fl [uarter hours tnd ten < 10) hours o( eta tivee from nursing <»r allied 

health major course work may be utilized rhe fiftj Bve ( ~ ir; > hours utilized will be 
determined bj tin- 1 lealth ^ lent e program dire* tor 

Regents and Exit Examinations 

rOTAl HCX RSPOR mi BA< HELOROl hi ,\i [HS [£N< i 

NO! E \n Hi I s students must be currentl) t PR certified at the time o( graduation 

Minor Concentration: 

Hie minor in l lealth Science requires 20 Quarter hours with grades of "C " or better I he 
student will complete the following: 

4 courses from 15 

Hi 501 Marketing Health 

HE 480 Epidemiolog 

HS J50 - Health in the Community 

HS 440 - Health Planning and Evaluation 

HS 445 - Seminar in 1 lealth Science 

TOTAL HOURS FOR THE BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE MINOR 20 

Health Science Gerontology Certificate Program 

Goal: To provide students with a multi-disciplinary background in aging and present 
them the opportunity to explore aspects of aging and relevant to interests and career 
goals 

Securing Admission to the Certificate Program: As soon as a student determines that 
he or she would like to complete the Gerontology Certificate Program, the student must 
complete the application for admission and return it to the Health Science Coordinator. 
Upon receipt oi the application, the student will be invited to meet with an assigned 
faculty member to discuss the proposed program of study. A minimum grade oi "C" or 
better must be earned in each course for the certificate to be awarded on the undergradu- 
ate level. A minimum overall grade point average of "B" or better must be earned for the 
certificate to be awarded on the graduate level. 

Curriculum Requirements: The Gerontology Certificate Program consists of six 
courses (30 qtr. hours). The courses are as follows: 

1. HS 485 - Survey of Gerontology 5 

2. PSY 475 - The Psychology of Aging 5 

3. PE 400 -Physical' Activity and the Older Adult 5 

4. HS 420 - Nutrition 5 

5. Elective - (from approved list) 5 

6. HS 425 - Gerontological Practicum 5 

(Prerequisite/Corequisites: HS 485, HS 420, PSY 475, PE 400, and elective.) 

Health Science Offerings 

HS 100 Introduction to Health Science (5-0-5) 

Exploration of the science of health. Based on the health (versus illness) model, this 
course will emphasize the enhancement of health as part of natural human devel- 
opment. The multifaceted health care delivery system will be introduced, and some 
ethical, philosophical, and socio-cultural issues of health care will be discussed. 

HS 200 Health and Human Development I (5-0-5) 

A presentation of human growth and development theory. Emphasis will be placed 
on the physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of man from pre-natal 
development to the adolescent stage of the human lifespan. This will be examined 
from the perspective of enhancing health and concomitantly avoiding illness. 



190 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HS 201 Health and Human Development II (5-05) 

The continuation of the study of human development from young adulthood to the 
completion of the life cycle. Special emphasis is placed on health concerns and 
lifestyle consequences of the adult years of the life span. 

HS 300 Health Problems In a Changing Society (5-0-5) 

A review of health status as a function of societal change. For example, the effects 
on health of sewage disposal, speed-limits, cold-war, technology, and such will be 
examined. 

HS 350 Health In the Community (5-0-5) 

Analysis of major community health problems, their causes, the role of individuals, 
community institutions, and government. 

HS 385 Survey of Gerontology (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the elements necessary for under- 
standing the aging situation. Emphasis will be placed on the physiological and 
functional changes associated with the aging process: chronic diseases, illness and 
morbidity, death and dying, and effects of aging on health, attitudes, and activities. 
Research methods in gerontology, major public policy issues, and financial issues 
will be included. 

HS 420 Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Area II Lab Science sequence. 

Nutrition, as a major component of lifestyle, is related to enhancement of health and 

contribution to illness. Basic concepts of nutrition and various "diets" are studied. 

HS 425 Gerontological Practicum (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite /co-requisites: HS 485, PSY 475, PE 400, HS 420, and gerontology 

elective. 

This course is designed to assist the student in applying the knowledge obtained 

from previous courses in order to implement a chosen role in gerontology. Each 

sponsoring organization will provide a qualified supervisor. A member of the ASC 

Faculty will be assigned to the practicum; he/she will establish performance 

criteria and evaluate accordingly. 

HS 440 Health Planning and Evaluation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 100. 

Planning and evaluation of health programs in a variety of settings. 

HS 445 Similar In Health Science (5-0-5) 

Corequisite/Prerequisite: HS 440. 

Health Science concepts are analyzed and synthesized. Emerging and emergent 

issues and trends are investigated. 

HS 450 Health Science Practicum (1-8-5) 

Corequisite/Prerequisite: PSY 220, HS 445, 440. 

This course provides the health science student the opportunity to be an active 

participant in an area of the health care industry. 

HE 452 Health/Fitness Practicum (1-8-5) 

Practicum in health and fitness management. 

HS 480 Epidemiology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 100 

The application of ecology to health and illness. An investigation into the various 
factors and conditions that determine the occurrence and distribution of health, 
disease, and death among groups of individuals. 



Health Education Offerings 



HE 260 Contemporary Health Issues (5-0-5) 

Study of major health topics along with their effects on modern society. Such topics 
as environmental pollution, medical ethics, health care costs, personal health, and 
health consumerism will be investigated. 






MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 191 



HI 2bl Health and Hum.m Sexuality I liuuitmn M ill) 

\ sftudj I't ihr relationship between health and sea education Health promotion 
strategic?, dealing v\ ith sexual beha\ kM Stxuall) transmitted d ise a s ei pregnane \ 
pregnane) p r evention aiui parenthood are involved i mphasif Is on interventions 
and curriculum material at iilable foi tee* hart and health educal 

HK 2b2 Health and Dltt I duration (2-0-2) 

\ itud) ol me e f f ectl Of tobacco Alcohol, and drug use and abuse on health it 

include! an analyaii ol me classification oi drugs, the efrecti oi drug usage, the 
legality oi drug usage and drug dependency Emphaaii i s on Intention! and 
curriculum nnttTi.il ivailable for tea< her! and health educator! 

HE 301 Marketing Health (5-0*5) 

\ turvej oi marketing strat e gi es utilised In health lettingi Bask prindpla! oi 
communication Integr a ted with variou! media modalitiea are explored rhe meth- 
od! and media will be designed for the biopsy* hosodal requirement! oi the i lient 

HE 360 School Health Education (3-0-3) 

An investigation ol the total school health environment and health Instruction 

HE 370 Health Promotion 

This course i! designed to differentiate between health education and health 
promotion. Different modalities of health promotion will be investigated. 

HE 420 Health Education In Rehabilitation (5-5) 

This course is designed to provide the student with the information necessary to aid 
patients in achieving their highest rehabilitation potential. The main objective is to 
aid the client in coping and complying with the prescribed regimen. 

HE 460 Health In the Curriculum (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HE 260, 261, 262, 360. 

The study of health education curriculum with emphasis upon materials and 
methods of teaching health education K-12. This course places special focus on the 
development of health education curriculum, instructional units, writing objec- 
tives, lesson and unit planning, and the relationship of health education to the total 
education program. 



Medical Technology 

Faculty 

Hardegree, Lester Jr., Program Director 
Edgar, John Ralph, Medical Director 
Rodgers, Anne 

Medical technology is a career in clinical laboratory science. Medical technologists 
perform and /or supervise the testing of blood, urine, spinal fluid and other body 
specimens. Applying the knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and biology, the medical 
technologist uses both manual and automated techniques to provide diagnostic data to 
physicians. 

The Medical Technology Program offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 
Technology and a Certificate of Completion of the Medical Technology Program. The B.S. 
in Medical Technology is awarded to students who complete all degree requirements for 
Armstrong State College. Entering Freshman, transfer students, and associate degree 
medical laboratory technicians are eligible for the degree. The Certificate of Completion 
is awarded to those who have completed a degree in biology, chemistry, microbiology or 
related science fields and to transient students from other institutions affiliated with the 
program which award the Bachelor of Science degree (Georgia College, Georgia South- 
ern University and Savannah State College). 

The B.S. in Medical Technology curriculum is a 4 year program. During the first two 
or three years students complete core curriculum courses in chemistry, biology, math- 



192 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

ematics, humanities and social science. The five quarter professional phase starts each fall 
quarter. Courses cover the major laboratory areas (urinalysis, hematology, clinical 
chemistry, blood banking, microbiology, serology), and are taught on campus. The 
clinical practicum is provided in the clinical laboratories of Candler General Hospital, the 
South Atlantic Red Cross Blood Center, Memorial Medical Center and St. Joseph's 
Hospital, all located in Savannah. Upon completion of the program, graduates are 
eligible to take the certification examination of the Board of Registry for Medical 
Technologists of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and the Clinical Labora- 
tory Scientist examination of the National Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory 
Personnel. 

Post Acceptance Requirements 

Students accepted into the program will be required to submit a complete Armstrong 
State College Health Professions Student Health Appraisal form. Prior to enrollment in 
the clinical practicum the student will be required to provide evidence of liability 
insurance and medical coverage. Students are responsible for their own transportation to 
and from the clinical sites and are required to adhere to arranged hospital time schedule. 

Progression Requirements 

1. The student must earn a "C" or better in each Medical Technology course. 

2. A student may repeat a single MT course only one time and at the next offering 
provided space is available. 

3. A student who must repeat a single MT course more than once or more than one MT 
course will be dismissed from the program with no option for readmission. 

4. The student must maintain an overall adjusted Grade Point Average of 2.0 or better. 
A student who falls below the 2.0 GPA will be placed on "Suspension" for one quarter. 
If the student's GPA is not raised by the end of the next quarter, then the student will 
be dismissed from the program. 

5. The student must complete the Professional coursework within three (3) consecutive 
years from the date of their initial admission to the Medical Technology Program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200 5 

Area II 20 

1. CHE 128, 129 10 

2. MAT 101, 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 101 5 

2. ZOO 208 5 

3. Electives in BIO, CHE and/or CS 20 

(Must contain at least 1 Biology or Zoology course which completes a 10 
hour sequence, and 1 Chemistry course.) 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 193 



State Requirement 
HIS 251 cm 252 

B ( ourses in the Majoi I leld 
1 l ppei l H\ ision Sequences 

BIO i" 

( in Ml 142 10 

Professional C ourses 

Ml 200 HO 150, 

411 421 431 441 451 461 490 

c Regents and I xit Examinations 

rOTAJ 1 98 

OFFERINGS 

MT 200 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science (2-2-3) 

\n introductory course to acquaint tin- student with tin- role oi tin- Medical 
rechnologist as i member ot tin- health i..m- team and basil skills needed tor the 
practice of clinical laboratory science, topics will include content common to 
several discipline areas and basic laboratory mathematics Ihf laboratory will 
emphasize basic skills common to many diagnostic procedures tests 

MT 310 Urinalysis and Body Fluids (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite Admission to the M I program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and Quantitative study ol the chemical and mi< roacopk constituents 

oi urine and other body thuds and the clinical significance Oi the test results 
MT 320 Clinical Microbiology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: BIO 351 or permission of program director. 

A study ol the relationship of bacteria to disease. Major emphasis is placed on the 
isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for human diseases. Also in- 
cluded is sensitivity testing and mycobacteriolog) 

MT 330 Clinical Hematology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and quantitative study of the formed elements of the blood. To include 
the complete blood count and specialized test procedures. This course will also 
include the basic principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. 

MT 340 Clinical Immunohematology I (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of basic immunohematologic principles and their application to the 
preparation and administration of whole blood and blood components. To include 
the selection and processing of donors, cross matching procedures, and antibody 
identification. 

MT 350 Clinical Chemistry I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: CHE 342, and MT 360 or permission of program director. 

A comprehensive study of the physiological principles, methodology and clinical 

significance of the biochemicals and elements found in the bodv fluids. 

MT 360 Clinical Instrumentation (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A basic study of the principles and operation of laboratory instrumentation. 
Emphasis will be placed on the individual components and the inter-relationship 
of the components. Electronics will be included. 

MT 370 Clinical Serology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the principles and procedures used in the isolation, identification and 
quantitation of diagnostically significant antigens and antibodies. 

MT 380 Clinical Parasitology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the pathogenesis, life cycle, and laboratory identification of human 
parasites. 



194 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MT 390 Clinical Mycology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A stud v of the pathogenesis and laboratory isolation and identification of fungi that 
can invade humans. 

MT 400 Directed Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand with approval of program director. 

A study of selected Medical Technology topics designed to meet the needs of the 
student. Credit will depend upon the work to be done. May be repeated up to 10 
quarter hours. 

MT 420 Clinical Microbiology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 320. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in microbiology. 

MT 430 Clinical Hematology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 330. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in hematology. 

MT 440 Clinical Immunohematology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 340. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in immunohematology. 

MT 450 Clinical Chemistry II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 350. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in clinical chemistry. 

MT 411 Phlebotomy Practicum (0-4-1) 

MT 421 Clinical Microbiology Practicum (0-16-4) 

MT 431 Clinical Hematology Practicum (0-16-4) 

MT 441 Clinical Immunohematology Practicum (0-8-2) 

MT 451 Clinical Chemistry Practicum (0-20-5) 

MT 461 Clinical Urinalysis Practicum (0-8-2) 

Total (0-72-18) 

Prerequisites: Completion of respective didactive MT courses. 
A structured clinical laboratory experience where the students integrate theory and 
application under supervision in the identified content area. This will provide time 
and facilities to allow the students to develop speed, confidence, and organization 
and to analyze and solve technical problems. 

MT 490 Management and Education (2-0-2) 

Basic concepts of laboratory management, leadership and education. 



Radiologic Technologies 

Faculty 

Gibson, Sharyn, Department Head 

* Tilson, Elwin, Clinical Coordinator 

McRae, Laurie, Program Director, Radiation Therapy 

* Graduate Faculty 

Radiologic Technology is a comprehensive term that is applied to the science of 
administering ionizing radiation, radionuclides, and other forms of energy to provide 
technical information and assistance to the physician in the diagnosis and treatment of 
diseases and injuries. This field offers four specific career specialities; radiography, 
nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy technology and diagnostic medical 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES IM 



ponograph) \t present the Radiologic rechnologies Program . • 
the spe< ialt) tree of radiography 

Program Goals 

I in- spe< Ifk goals of tin- Program are u follows 

i ro educate superlative clinicians In addition to ma 

perform routine radiographic examinations, the Program s graduate w ill possess 
skilN necessar) to perform non routine and spe< ial radiographic pn 
I o expose the student to an In depth analysis ol the art and st leni eol radiograph) 
Hie student will recei\ e not only an indepth edu< ation to radiography but also in 
related natural and sodal sciences 

) lo give the Btudents a well rounded liberal arts education, in addition to the 
professional component ol the curriculum, the student receives a well rounded 
liberal arts education so that the student will be able to effe< th elj integrate into 
km let) 

Professional Insurance, Transportation 

1 ocal hospitals arc affiliated with the college tor the Clinical Education courses 
Student radiographers are responsible tor providing their own transportation to the 
hospitals. 

Prior to matriculation through Clinical Education Courses, students are required to 
submit evidence ol professional liability insurance, health insurance c PR certification, 
and a physical examination. Specific information regarding these requirements will be 
distributed to students admitted to the Program. 

Progression Requirements 

For progres s ion through the Program, the following is required: 

1. Science courses (ZOO 208, 209, CHE 201, CS 115) 

a. A passing grade in each course. 

b. A "C" or better in at least three of these courses. 

c. No more than two (2) science courses mav be repeated, ^nd that no one 
course may be repeated more than once. 

2. Radiography courses 

a. A "C" or better in each radiography course. 

b. A student who fails any radiography course or earns a grade less than "C " in 
RAD 115 will be suspended from the Program. 

c. If a student earns a grade o\ "D" in one radiography course, the student will 
be placed on probation and must repeat the course. It a grade ot "D" is 
earned in a second radiography course, the student will be suspended from 
the Program. 

d. In the event a student makes less than a grade ot "C " in any prerequisites tor 
a Radiography course, the student may not be allowed to progress m the 
curriculum sequence. 

3. Students must have a 2.0 GPA to graduate from the Program. 

Attendance and Advanced Standing 

A student must matriculate each quarter, including Summer Quarter, to remain in the 
Program. If, because of illness or other extenuating circumstances, a student must be 
away from school for a quarter, the student must seek formal approval from the 
Department Head for such an absence. If such approval i^ not sought and granted, the 
student will be dropped from active status and must reapply for admission before 
continuing in the Program. Readmission is based on the readmission criteria and space 
availability, and are competitive in nature. 



1 96 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Radiologic Technologies Program is committed to a philosophy of educational 
flexibility to meet the needs of the profession. Individuals who are graduates of Certifi- 
cate (hospital) Programs and working in the profession who are certified by the American 
Registry of Radiologic Technologists may receive advanced standing by a process of 
exemption examinations and CLEP examinations. These individuals may be awarded 
Credit-By-Examination up to 45 quarter hours for previous professional education. 
Please contact the Department Head for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 
IN RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 33 

Area 1 10 

ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

Area II 5 

MAT 101 5 

Area III 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS113 5 

Area IV 5 

CHE 201 5 

Area V 3 

Any three physical education credits 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 60 

RAD 104, 110, 115, 116, 117, 118, 121, 122, 123 30 

RAD 201, 202, 203, 205, 221, 222, 223, 224 31 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

CS115 5 

ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 109 

Radiologic Technologies Offerings 

RAD 104 Principles of Radiographic Exposure (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Program. 

Factors influencing radiographic quality and conditions influencing exposures are 
presented. Attenuating devices, beam restricting devices, and accessory equipment 
are demonstrated. Technic charts and formation are vehicles for the application of 
the radiographic process. 

RAD 110 Patient Care and Interaction (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Program Concepts of patient care including 
physical and psychological needs of the family and patient will be addressed. 
Principles of body mechanics and patient transfer techniques, interaction with the 
terminally ill, obtaining vital signs, administration of injections, I.V. maintenance, 
urinary catherization, and dealing with emergency medical situations will be 
studied. Infectious disease processes and universal precautions will be included. 

RAD 115 Radiographic Procedures and Radiation Protection (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the program. 

The theory and principles of radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen 
are studied. Emphasis is placed on radiographic examination of the visceral organs 
requiring the use of contrast media, spatial relationships, patient positioning, 
radiation protection methodology, equipment manipulation, and quality evalua- 
tion of the study. Basic medical terminology will be included. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 



197 



K \i> lib Radiographic Procedural n (4 WR 

Prerequisites I ormal admiatJoR i»> the program end • < • In R %l I 

["he bask theor) end principles ol radiographs procedures of the extremities and 
ihouldei girdle are studied I mphasis is placed on osteo anatomy spatial relation 
ships patient positioning equipment manipulation endqualit) evaluation of the 
radiographs examinations Basi< medical terminology will be IncJikk 

HAD ir Radiographic Procedural in (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites I ormal admission to the pro gra m and RAI I I \ti 
Hie theory and principles of radiographic examinations of the spines, bony thorax 
and peJvk girdle are studied I mphasis is placed »'n the oateo anatomy! ipanal 
relationships, patient positioning equipment manipulation, and Quality evalua 
tn>n ol the radiographic examinations 

RAD US Radiographic Procedures IV (3.5-1.5) 

Prerequisites Formal admission to tin- program and RAI I 1 17 
rhe theory and principles ol facial bones, cranium, heart breast, reproduction 
organs, and additional non-routine examinations art- studied Emphasis is pla< ed 
on the osteo and soft-tissue anatomy, spatial relationships, patient positioning, 
equipment manipulation, and quality evaluation ol the radiographk examinations 

RAD 121 Clinical Education I (0-8-1) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Program, permission oi the instructor, and 

C PR certified RAD 104, RAD 110, and RAD 115 must be taken as corequisite or 

prerequisite. 

Orientation to patient care, introduction to areas involving the field of radiology, 

Blld orientation to the clinical setting are presented This is a supervised clinical 

practice in performing radiographic procedures, radiation protection, patient care, 
equipment orientation, radiographic technique, darkroom procedures, and film 
quality evaluation, observing and participating in routine radiographic examina- 
tions is included. 

RAD 122 Clinical Education II (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 104 and RAD 121 and permission of the instructor. RAD 116 
must be taken as corequisite or prerequisite. 

This is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures with 
an emphasis on the competency evaluation of routine radiographic examinations 

RAD 123 Clinical Education III (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 1 22 and permission of the instructor. RAD 1 1 7 must be taken as 
a corequisite or prerequisite. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 
with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of routine radiographic examina- 
tions. 

RAD 201/202 Radiation Science I & II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Permission of the instructor. 

This course deals with the application of radiation physics as it relates to the 
production, propagation and detection of electromagnetic and particulate radia- 
tion. Emphasis will be given to mechanisms describing the interaction of X- rays 
with matter, photographic and electronic image detection, electronic circuitrv. and 
the physical function of associated radiographic equipment. 

RAD 203 Radiobiology (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: RAD 202, ZOO 209 or permission of instructor 

This course is designed to give the radiography student an understanding of the 
effects of radiation exposure, dose limits, and structural protection requirements. 
Topics included will be somatic and genetic effects of radiation exposure, measure- 
ment and protection methods, plus NCRP and BRH standards. 



198 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RAD 205 Quality Assurance (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a study of equipment testing and instrumentation, record keeping 

systems, and statistical analysis of equipment and supply usage. Emphasis will be 

given to testing procedures. QA program implementation, and federal government 

guidelines. 

Clinical Education IV (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 123 and permission of the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

Clinical Education V (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 221 and permission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

Clinical Education VI (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 222 and permission of the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

Clinical Education VII (0-24-4) 

Prerequisites: RAD 223, successful completion of Regents' Examination, and per- 
mission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 
with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. The 
program Exit Examination is included in this course. 

RAD 290 Selected Topics In Advanced Medical Imaging (4-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 

This is an elective course that is offered upon demand. Topics such as neurovascular 
system examinations, central nervous system examination, abdominal and periph- 
eral vascular studies, heart studies, computerized imaging systems, and magnetic 
resonance imaging may be included. 



RAD 221 



RAD 222 



RAD 223 



RAD 224 



Radiation Therapy Technology Certificate Program 

Radiation Therapy is the use of ionizing radiation to treat disease (primarily cancer) 
and is an important modality in cancer treatment. 

Program Goals 

1. The student will be enculturated into the art and science of Radiation Therapy as 
evidenced by graduates who exhibit accurate, responsible, and compassionate behav- 
iors as members of the healthcare team responsible for providing radiation treatments. 

2. To graduate students who consistently score 5% higher than the national mean on the 
certifying examination for Radiation Therapy Technology. 

3. To meet the needs of the community by supplying Radiation Therapists to Savannah 
and the Surrounding communities. 

4. To promote professional awareness among the students and the radiation therapy 
community. 

Admission 

A.R.R.T. registered or registry eligible radiographers may apply to this 12 month 
certificate program. The program begins in the Fall of each year, thus students are 
admitted only once per year. The program makes the determination of admission based 
on scholastic history and personal references. See the Radiologic Technologies Depart- 
ment for further information and a program application. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 



Program for the Certificate in Radiation Therapy Technology 
K\n vi 1,316,312 

[Ota! '»urs 

Radiation Therapy Course Offerings 

!\\i)ini Principles oi Radiation rherapj (5-0-5) 

I'n- requisite Formal admission to me program 

\n Introduction to radiation therapy including terminology, as well as clinical and 

technical criteria utilized in tin' treatment ot cancel patients 

Methods of Patient C are (5-0-5) 

Pre requisite or co requisite RAD J01. 

Insight hi to the physical and emotional care of tin' can< er patient Emphasis will be 

placed on radiation side effects as well as special care required by individuals 

receiving Radiation rherapy 

Radiation Protection/Radiobiology in Radiation Therapy (5-0-5) 

Pre requisite or co requisite: RAD 301. 

The measurement and reduction ot radiation exposure to tin- patient, healthcare 

worker, and general public will be studies. The principles ot cellular response to 

low and high dose radiation will be thoroughly explored 

RAD 304 Oncologic Pathology (4-0-4) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 301, RAD 3(13 and permission ot tin- instructor. 
The underlying pathologic mechanisms ot tumor development and the theories 
describing causation ot cellular changes will be explored. Tumor classification will 
also be introduced. 

RAD 310 Radiation Oncology I (5-0-5) 

P re-requisite or co-requisite: RAD 304 and permission ot the instructor. 

Aspects ot cancer .is a disease including tumor classification, staging, and the 

rationale ot treatment choice will be discussed. 

RAD 311 Radiation Oncology II (5-0-5) 
Pre-requisite: RAD 310. 

A study of malignant neoplasms with an emphasis on etiology, epidemiology. 
treatment methods, and prognosis tor cancers affecting each major system oi the 
body. 

RAD 312 Radiation Oncology III (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 311. 

Special topics in cancer treatment will be explored including the latest innovations 
in the modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immuno- 
therapy. 
RAD 318 Quality Assurance in Radiation Therapy (3-0-3) 
Pre-requisite: RAD 315 and permission ot the instructor. 

Facets of quality assurance in a radiation oncology department including principles 
of record-keeping as well as methods of baseline testing and periodic calibration ot 
commonly used equipment. 

RAD 314 Treatment Planning (5-0-5) 

Co-requisite: RAD 316 and permission of the instructor. 

Provides the student with the introductory skills necessary to plan and calculate 
dosage for a range of treatment techniques. Treatment planning methods with and 
without computer assistance will be included. 

RAD 315 Radiation Therapy Physics I (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 303. 

Encompasses the basic principles of radiation therapy physics including the nature 

of radiation and the interactions of radiation and matter as related to radiation 

oncology. 



200 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RAD 316 Radiation Therapy Physics II (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 303. 

The applicability of physics to radiation therapy including the use of radioactive 

materials in the treatment of cancer will be explored. 

RAD 320 Clinical Education I (0-16-2) 

Pre-requisite: Formal admission to the program. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. Orienta- 
tion to simulation, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient care activities 
within a radiation oncology department will be provided. 

RAD 321 Clinical Education II (0-24-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 320 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy: simulation, 
planning, patient care, and delivery phases. Basic skills will be evaluated with 
clinical examinations designed to demonstrate competence. 

RAD 322 Clinical Education III (0-24-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 321 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy: simulation, 
planning, patient care, and delivery phases. Basic and advanced skills will be 
evaluated with clinical examinations designed to demonstrate competence. 

RAD 323 Clinical Education IV (0-32-4) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 322 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. Simula- 
tion, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient care skills will be refined. 
Advanced skills will be evaluated with clinical examinations designed to demon- 
strate competence. 



Respiratory Therapy 

Faculty 

Bowers, Ross, Department Head 

Di Benedetto, Robert, Co-Medical Director 

Morris, Stephen, Co-Medical Director 

Smith, William, Acting Director of Clinical Education 

For the two-year (seven consecutive quarters) program leading to the Associate in 
Science degree in Respiratory Therapy, the student must complete a curriculum of 59 
quarter hours in academic courses and 63 quarter hours within the major. The A.S. degree 
from an accredited Respiratory Therapy program qualifies the graduate for entry into the 
Registry credentialing system. The Registry is the highest professional credential avail- 
able in the field of respiratory therapy. The credentialing process is a two-step nationally 
administered examination. Step 1 is a comprehensive written exam to be taken shortly 
after graduation. The graduate who passes this exam will earn the entry level credential 
C.R.T.T. and will be eligible to enter the registry credentialing system. The registry exam 
consists of a written and a clinical simulation component. The candidate who passes both 
parts of the registry exam will earn the credential Registered Respiratory Therapist. 

PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS 

For progression through the Associate Degree Program in Respiratory Therapy, the 
following must be maintained: 

1. Courses Related to the Major (CHE 201, 202, ZOO 208, 209, 211, BIO 210) 

a. A student may carry no more than one grade of less than "C" 

b. A grade of "F" must be repeated the next quarter that the course is offered 

c. A student must have successfully completed the requirements for CHE 202 
and ZOO 211 by the end of the summer quarter of the freshman year. Failure 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 201 



tocompl) with this requirement will result In suspension from the program 

\ student suspended from the pro gra m will be eligible foi resdmission 
d ^ student who must repea t more than one com radeoi I 

w ill be dismissed from the program with no option t * >r readmission 
I Courses in the Respiratory rherapyMaioi 

.i \ grade oi ( 01 better is required foi ea< h course thai ii i prerequisite I 

subsequent course Failure to comply with this requirement will result in 

suspension mom tlu- program 

\ student who earns a grade oi less than "( must repeat that i ourse the 

next quarter it is offered 
i A student ma) repeat a respirator) therap) course only on 

d. Students who must repeat a respirator) therap) course more than one time 
will be dismissed from the progr a m with no option tor readmission 

e. Students who must repeat more than one respiratory therapy course will be 
dismissed from the program with no option tor readmissknt 

I c irade Point Average 
The maintenance oi a 2.0 GPA is desirable throughout the respiratory therapy 
program, students who fall below 2.0 are subject to the academk status classifi- 
cation identified in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog Students 

placed On academic Warning who do not raise their GPA to the minimum 
criteria tor academic C.ood Standing the subsequent quarter will be suspended 
from the program until such time they return to Good Standing. Courses used 
to raise the GPA must be approved by their academic advisor. 

4 Regents H\am 

Successful completion of the Regent's Exam is a requirement tor all students 
receiving a degree from the University System of Georgia. The School of Health 
Professions requires that a student must have passed both parts of the Regent s 
Exam prior to their last quarter in their major. Failure to comply with this 
requirement will result in suspension from the program until such time that the 
exam is successfully completed. 

5. Exit Exam 

The University System of Georgia requires that all students take a comprehen- 
sive Exit Exam in their major field. The department of respiratory therapy uses a 
nationally validated exam for this purpose. The exit exam is administered 
during the spring quarter of the sophomore year. All students are required to 
pass this exam prior to the end of the spring quarter. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 59 

Area I: Humanities 

1. ENG 101,102 10 

Area II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences 

1. MATH 101 5 

Area III: Social Sciences 

1. HIS 251 or 252 3 

2. POS113 5 

3. PSY 101 or SOC 201 or ANT 201 5 

Area IV: Courses Related to Major Field 

1. CHE 201, 202 8 

2. ZOO 208, 209, 211 13 

3. BIO 210 5 



202 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area V: Physical Education 

1. PE 117 or 166 2 

2. PE Activity Course 

Courses in the Major Field 63 

1. RT 100, 110, 113, 114, 115, 116, 120, 121 32 

2. RT 211, 221, 212, 215, 216, 222, 217, 223 31 

Regent's and National Standardized 

Self Assess Exams 



TOTAL 122 
OFFERINGS 

RT 100 Medical Terminology (3-0-3) 

Offered: Fall quarter. 

A study of the language of medicine: word construction; definition; abbreviations 
and symbols; and use of terms related to all areas of medical science, hospital 
service and the medical specialties. Open to non-majors. 

RT 110 Patient Assessment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 208, CHE 201 
Offered: Winter Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 1 10 is to teach the student the assessment skills required to 
evaluate and develop a respiratory care plan. By the completion of RT 110 the 
student will be able to: review the medical record, conduct a patient interview, 
perform a physical examination of the chest, monitor and interpret vital signs, 
perform ventilatory monitoring procedures, interpret arterial blood gases and 
interpret the chest x-ray. The content of RT 110 is essential to the student's 
progression to the clinical phase of the curriculum. 

RT 113 Respiratory Therapy Equipment (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite: CHE 202, RT 110 
Offered: Spring Quarter 

A course designed to focus on the technology and equipment used in providing 
respiratory care. The student will be able to select and obtain equipment appropri- 
ate to the care plan, assemble and check for proper function and identify and correct 
equipment malfunctions. Quality control and asepsis procedures will also be 
emphasized. 

RT 114 General Patient Care (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite: RT 110 
Corequisite: RT 115, RT 113, 120 
Offered: Spring Quarter 

A course designed to focus on implementation and evaluation of the respiratory 
care plan. The student will develop the cognitive and technical skills necessary to 
initiate and evaluate the patient's response to: 02 therapy, CPR, aerosol and 
humidity therapy, bronchial hygiene, IPPB therapy and airway care. A protocol for 
initiating a change in the care plan will also be emphasized. 

RT 120 Applied Patient Care (0-8-2) 

Prerequisite: RT 110 

Corequisite: RT 114,113,115 

Offered: Spring Quarter 

A clinical practicum designed to orient the student to the hospital environment. 

Basic assessment skills and 02 rounds will be emphasized. Students will also 

participate in the cleaning, sterilization, assembly, and routine maintenance of 

equipment. 

RT 115 Pulmonary Pharmacology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 209, CHE 202, RT 110 

Offered: Summer Quarter 

This course is designed to give the student an in-depth look at drugs that directly 

affect the pulmonary system. During this course the student will study: route of 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 203 



drug idministration phennacodyn.iiniis drug mtrr.it irons, muutkiiu-sis .wul 
mou'kiiifiu ilnu;s bronchospasmand bronchodilatora choline cromolyn 

sodium corticosteroids sntibiotio intitiberculan drugi respirator) stimulants 
and depressants snesthetfc i rod neuromusi ulai blot I . 

Applied Ki'spir.itotN ( IK I (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites Rl 120 
(. )ffered Summei <ju,u pa 

rhe primar) goal ol ki 121 is to provide tin- student sufficient opportunitief t<» 
appl) the cognitive, affective and psychomotoi skills developed In Rl 1 10 and K I 
1 1 1 in the clinical setting By the completion ot this 1 ourse the student will be able 
to coUed data neceasar) for developing the care plan, Implement t hi- prescribed 
care plan, evaluate the patient's response ti> therapy snd modify or reconunend 
modification ol the care ^lan based on patient response BythecompletionofRI 121 
the student will be able todemonstrate problem solving skills m the clinical setting 
rhe clinical competencies developed in Rl 121 area prerequisite tor progr ess ion to 
the critk si care ( omponenl ol the curriculum. 
Diagnostic Procedures (4-2-5) 
Prerequisites: ZOO 211, RT no, RT 115. 
Offered: Summer Quartet 

The pnmarv goal of RT lib is to teach the Studenl tin- cognitive and psychomotor 

skills necessary to perform or assist the physician in performing diagnostic proce- 
dures in the blood gas, pulmonary function and cardiovascular labs. 
Hie student will also develop competencies in cardiovascular assessment By the 

completion oi this course the student will be able to interpret diagnostic data and 
apply it to patient care. 

Adult Critical Care I (4-3-5) 
Prerequisites: RT 116, RT 121 
Offered: Fall Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 21 1 is to teach the student the cognitive and psychomotor 
skills necessary to establish and maintain the patient ventilator system. Emphasis 
will be on knowledge of ventilatory support equipment as well as techniques for 
initiation assessment modification and discontinuation of ventilatory support 
systems. The content of RT 211 is essential for progression to RT 212. 

Applied Respiratory Care II (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 116, RT 121 

Offered: Fall Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 221 is to provide the student sufficient opportunities to 

apply the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills developed in RT 116 and RT 

21 1 in the clinical setting. Emphasis will be placed on developing clinical competen- 
cies in the ICU, diagnostic lab and operating room setting. 

Adult Critical Care II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, RT 221 
Offered: Winter Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 212 is to teach the student how to evaluate the effect of 
mechanical ventilation on other organs or body systems and to apply that knowl- 
edge to the total care of the patient. The student will develop a broader base for 
understanding the total patient care plan. Emphasis will be placed on hemody- 
namic monitoring, critical care pharmacology, fluid balance, shock and trauma. 

Applied Respiratory Care III (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, RT 221 

Offered: Winter Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 222 is to provide the student with sufficient opportunities 

to apply the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills developed in RT 21 1 and RT 

212 to the care of the critically ill patient. The emphasis will be placed on patient 
monitoring and evaluating the effect of therapeutic procedures on other organs or 
body systems. The student will begin an orientation rotation to the Pediatric and 
Neonatal ICUs during this course. 



204 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RT 215 Perinatal Care (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, 221 
Offered: Winter Quarter 
The primary goal of RT 215 is to teach the student the cognitive, affective and 
psychomotor skills necessary to care for the critically ill pediatric patient and 
neonate. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge of ventilatory support equipment 
as well as techniques for initiation assessment, modification and discontinuation of 
ventilatory support systems. The student will also study embryology, assessment 
of the fetus in utero, complicated pregnancies and deliveries, resuscitation of the 
newborn and abnormal pathophysiologic states. 

RT 216 Cardiopulmonary Medicine (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, 221 
Offered: Winter quarter. 
The primary goal is to focus on the pathophysiology associated with cardiopulmo- 
nary diseases or conditions commonly seen in the hospital setting. Emphasis will 
be placed on assessment, rapid recognition, intervention and management of 
potential life-threatening conditions. Emphasis will be placed on developing deci- 
sion making and problem solving skills. 

RT 223 Applied Respiratory Care IV (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 212, RT 216, RT 215, RT 222 
Offered: Spring Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 223 is to provide the student with sufficient opportunities 
to apply cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills in the care of the critically ill 
neonate and pediatric patient. Emphasis will be placed on care of patients requiring 
ventilatory support. Students will continue to develop their skills in the adult 
critical care unit. The student will also be oriented to the care of the chronically ill 
patient in the home or secondary care facility. 

RT 217 Seminar In Respiratory Care (2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: RT 212, RT 216, RT 215 
Offered: Spring Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 217 is to provide an open forum for discussion of contem- 
porary issues facing the profession and the health care delivery system. Topics to 
be discussed include credentialing, gerontology and the health care needs of the 
elderly, the shift in focus from primary to secondary care facilities, care of ventilator 
dependent patients in the home and the impact of DRG's and the prospective 
payment system on the traditional respiratory care service. 




H 



o 



K 



i, 









206 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Academic Divisions 
Division of Education 

Faculty 

Newberry, Lloyd, Division Head 

* Agyekum, Stephen 
Anderson, Donald 
Ball, A. Patricia 

* Battiste, Bettye Anne, 

Baccalaureate Coordinator 
Bergin, Joyce 
Bjorn, Edith 

* Burgess, Clifford 
Chenault, George 

* Cosgrove, Maryellen 

* Graduate Faculty 
Baccalaureate Advisor, Aeger, Vicki L. 



* Dandy, Evelyn 

* Galloway, Herbert 

* Harwood, Pamela, Associate 

Director Graduate Studies 
Hobe, John 
Schollaert, Warren 
Sisson, Michelle 

* Stokes, William, Assistant Dean 

* Strauser, Edward 

* Walworth, Margaret 
White, Susan 



Philosophy, Goals, and Objectives 

The Division of Education offers a variety of degree programs designed for the 
preparation of competent teachers who are committed to excellence in the profession and 
who are ultimately prepared to become decision makers in the classroom. Appropriate 
to this philosophy the faculty have established three program outcomes which develop 
and exemplify the teacher as: (1 ) deliverer of content, (2) manager of classroom dynamics, 
and (3) developer of professional self. 

Pursuant and preamble to these outcomes the Division of Education has developed 
the following goals: 

To provide prospective teachers with proficiency in the content of their selected 
teaching field. 

To provide the prospective teacher with the appropriate learning theory and method- 
ology necessary to successful implementation of classroom plans and procedures. 

To provide prospective teachers with the abilities and skills which will enable them 
to offer appropriate educational opportunities to students representing a variety of 
cultural and economic backgrounds. 

To provide prospective teachers with the abilities and skills that will enable them to 
meet the special needs of exceptional children. 

To provide a teacher education program that will offer the professional and educa- 
tional atmosphere conducive to the development of teachers who possess the highest 
qualities of character, commitment, and professional competence. 

Each degree program in the Division of Education is guided by an individual set of 
objectives which is specific to that degree program, but also reflects the Division goals. 

Degrees 

The Division of Education offers the following degrees: 

Bachelor of Science in Education in: 

Art Education 

Business Education (with Savannah State College) 

Early Elementary Education 

Middle School Education 

Social Sciences Education (History) 

Social Sciences Education (Political Science) 

Speech Correction 
With the School of Arts and Sciences: 

Biology with Teacher Certification 

Chemistry with Teacher Certification 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 207 



i nglish with if.u ha c ei titu ation 

i Ustor) w ith l tm ha t ertification 

Mathematics with I ea< hei t ertification 

Musk Education 

Political & ience with I es* hit c ertiAcation 
raduate degrees >\i Ed and Ed s I are offered b) ( Southern I niversity In 

affiliation with Armstrong State t ollege Km paruV luanv see tin- graduate set tion <>t t h»- 
catal< 

Accreditation 

All teacher education p r o gra ms at Armstrong State ( ollege are accredited by the 
c ,cori;Ki P rofes s ional Standards Commission and tin- National ( oundlforAo reditation 
c4 i eacher Education. 

Academic Advisement 

Students desiring to pursue a teacher education program should seek academk 
advisement in the Division of Education during their tirst quarter of residence. An 

advisor will bo assigned to each student and will assist the student in establishing a 
program ol study form which should bo followed without deviation. I hese torms will bo 
tiled m the Division office and a copy provided to each student It is the responsibility of 

the student to initiate and maintain the advisement process 

All completed courses to be used to satisfy the requirements of a student's course oi 
Study must be included on the official Program Studies Planning Form at the time of its 
acceptance by the Baccalaureate Coordinator 

Admission to Teacher Education 

A student wishing to pursue a teacher education program leading to teacher certifi- 
cation must apply for admission to the teacher education program. This application will 
be tiled normally during the second quarter of the sophomore year or, tor transfer 
students, in the first quarter ol the junior year. Application forms may be secured from 
the Division of Education. 

The following criteria apply for admission to the teacher education program: 

1. Completion of at least 60 quarter hours of college credit with a minimum 2 5 
(unrounded) GPA. 

2. Completion of EDN 200 and ENG 101 , 102, and 201 or their equivalents, with a "C" 
or better in each course. 

3. Competence in oral and written expression. 

4. Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching potential. 

5. Statement of good health signed by a licensed physician. 

6. Satisfactory completion of the Regents' Test. Students already holding baccalaure- 
ate degrees from an accredited institution are exempted from the Regents' Test 

7. Submission of four letters of recommendation; such letters may be secured from 
college or universities where applicants may have been previously enrolled. 

8. Submission of an up-to-date copy of the program of studv planning sheet. 

Recommendation for Certificate 

To be recommended for a teaching certificate, a student must complete the degree 
requirements for an approved teacher certification program of Armstrong State College 
and must complete at Armstrong State College a majority of the courses in each of the 
following areas: the professional sequence, the teaching field, and the related field. 

Liability Insurance Requirement 

All students who participate in courses for which field experiences (i.e., laboratory 
practicum) are required must provide evidence of liability insurance (i.e., SG AE member- 
ship or must sign a waiver of insurance coverage). Students should consult advisors 
regarding this requirement. 



208 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is to provide an opportunity for future 
teachers (1) to learn what teachers do at the beginning of a new school term, (2) to 
participate in experiences that will assist the prospective teacher with future decisions 
concerning teaching as a career, and (3) to become acquainted with the organization and 
curriculum of a particular school. 

The September Practicum occurs during the first two weeks of the public school term 
(usually in late August and early September) and should be scheduled during the 
student's junior or senior year. No credit is given for the September Practicum, but it is 
a requirement in all of the teaching fields in the Armstrong State College Teacher 
Education Program. 

Application for the September Practicum should be made during the first week of the 
Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in the forthcoming September. The student 
should contact the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching, the culminating activity of the professional sequence, is provided in 
selected off-campus school centers. The full quarter of student teaching is arranged 
cooperatively by the college, the participating schools, and supervising teachers. Com- 
pleted applications for admission to student teaching must be submitted to the 
Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences during the first week of the quarter 
preceding student teaching. While student teaching, the student is required to adhere to 
established policies and procedures of the cooperating school system in addition to those 
policies and procedures established by the college. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assignment is made. School 
placement is jointly arranged by the college and the participating school system. The 
student will receive a letter of assignment. Orientation to student teaching will be held 
during the first several days of the quarter in which student teaching is scheduled. The 
following requirements must be met before a student can enroll in student teaching: 

1 . Completion of the core curriculum. 

2. Admission to Teacher Education. 

3. Completion of all teaching field courses. 

4. Satisfactory completion of the September Practicum and the Regents' Exam. 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Media Competency Exam or EDN 240. 

6. Have at least senior status. 

7. Completion of the basic 10 hours of methods and curriculum at Armstrong. 

8. Have a 2.5 average on all courses attempted, and "C" or better in all courses 
acceptable toward the teaching field, professional sequence, concentration, and 
related electives. 

9. Be endorsed by four approved full time members of the faculty, one of whom must 
be the student's advisor. 

10. Be endorsed by the Division of Education. 

Students who are completing requirements for certification as outlined in a State 
Department of Education Letter and are requesting a student teaching assign- 
ment must have a minimum 2.5 GPA and be in good academic standing. They 
must also meet the requirements found in items 7, 9, and 10 above. 
A student will not be permitted to take additional courses during student teaching. 

Student teachers are not permitted to teach in a school in which their children are 

enrolled. 

Program Completion 

A student must complete the college's approved program for certification within the 
four years following admission to the Teacher Education program. In the event that the 
student does not complete the program in four years, the individual must meet the 
requirements of the program in effect at that time. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 



\ 01 m ceptable completion ea< h course in the teaching field ; rial educal 

sequence concentration, and related fields must be passed with .1 grade 1 >1 ( 

Exit Examination 

Students are required to take the <- Seorgia Iea< her <■ erufkation I * -^ t during student 
tea< King of Immediate!) upon «. ompletiofi of theii degree program 

Brunswick Center Programs 

rhe Bachdoi ol Sdence In Education with concentrations in \ laxly c hildhood and 
Middle School Education is offered by Armstrong State ( ollegeal Brunswick < ol 
through the Brunswick c enter. I he program, which 1^ primarily an evening pro gram , 
allows students who have an .i^k iate degree to complete thoir ba< <. alaureate degree in 
Brunswick. Intere st ed students should contact Dr.C lene Barber, I Krectoroi theBrunswk k 
Center or Di 1 loyd Newberry, I lead, Division ot Education at Ajrmstrong State C ollege 

Cooperative Program 

Savannah Mate College cooperates with Armstrong state c ollege in offering a ma|of 
m Business Education c oursework in the major field ot study tor this pro gra m is offered 

b\ Savannah State. Students interested m this program should contact the head ot the 
Division ot Education at Armstrong State College. 

Minor Concentration 

A minor in teacher education is available for students who do not wish to earn teacher 
certification. The minor incorporates courses which address leading concepts and 
problems in the field of education. Students majoring in general studies, psychology, 
health science, and Other fields may find this minor a valuable adjunct to their programs 
ot study. For the minor to be officially recognized, all courses m the minor must be passed 
with a grade oi "C" or better. 

EDN 200 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

EXC 310 - Introduction to Exceptional Children 5 

EDN 201 - or PSY 201 - Human Growth and Development 3 

EDN 240 -Educational Media 2 

CS 296 - Computer Literacy for Educators 3 

One additional upper divisional education course 

(Illustrative courses include library media courses, EDN courses and 

EXC courses.) 

Total 25 

Bachelor Programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN EARLY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101,102, or 192, 201 or 292 1 5 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 3 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 



210 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101 10 

3. HIS 251 or 252 and GEO 211 or 212 10 

Area V 5 

1. CS296andPE117 5 

Area VI 6 

1. PE 103 or 108,166 3 

2. Activity courses 3 

B. Specialized Content Courses 40 

1. ART 320 or MUS 320 5 

2. MAT 391 5 

3. EDN 324, 336, 342, 422, 434, 435 30 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 304, 432, 436, 471, 472, 473 35 

D. Electives (upper division content) 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1 . GEO 211 or 212 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101, EDN 200 15 

3. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108; 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Content Courses Required and /or Appropriate for Concentration Choices: 

(15 hrs. required) 15 

EDN 336, 342, 418, 428, 434, 435, MAT 391, 393. (EDN 428 must be included 
here or in C or D.) 

C. Concentrations 45 

MAT Concentration must incl. MAT 391, 393 

SCI Concentration must incl. EDN 434, 435 
LA Concentration must incl. EDN 336, 418, 428 
SOC. ST. Concentration must incl. EDN 342 

1. Concentration I 25 

Language Arts, Mathematics, Science or Social Studies 

2. Concentration II 20 

Must be from remainder in Concentration I 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 21 1 



I ) Professional Sequence 
l ( s |96 

I X< 110 1 DN KM I 
\ Regents' and Exit Examinations 

rOTAI 194 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION (HISTORY) 

Hours 

\ c leneral Requirements 

\UM 1 

1. BNG 101, 102 or 192,201 or 292 15 

: One course from: AR1 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 ... 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101. 220 

2. A pprov ed laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 104 or 191, 115 or 192;POS113 15 

: PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 and EDN 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

3. Approved language sequence through 103 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

3. Required Elective: 

One course from ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252; HIS 371 or 377 10 

2. HIS 450 5 

3. Approved Non-Western HIS 

course(s) 5-10 

4. Approved 300+ US HIS course 5 

5. Approved European HIS course(s) 5-10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 30 

1. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

2. GEO 211, 212, elective 10-15 

3. POS305 5 

4. POS317,318 5-10 

D. Professional Sequence 30 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 449 15 

2. EDN 471, 472, 473 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 
EDUCATION (POLITICAL SCIENCE) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 



212 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 and EDN 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; any GEO course; SOC 201 5 

3. Approved language sequence through 103 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108,117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

3. Required elective; 

One course from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 30 

1. POS 305 and 317 or 318 10 

2. POS 333 or 334 5 

3. POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 426, or 429 5 

4. POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445 or 447 5 

5. POS Upper Level Elective 5 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Courses from three of the following: 

a. GEO 211, 212, elective 10-15 

b. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

c. 300+ HISelectives 10-15 

d. ANT, PSY, SOC electives 10-15 

D. Professional sequence 30 

1. EXC310 5 

2. EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN ART EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. ART 111, 112, 213 15 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 213 



tree V 

l P 117 

•\ tt\ courses 
Stale Requirement 
HIS 251 
B reaching c oncentratton 

l AKI 201,202.204 15 

\KI 271 •' 10-15 

I \Ki • I 4(H) 

4 Elective 5 

C Professional Sequence 

1 EXC310 EDN B5 471 172 473 

lectives 0-5 

\ Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 194-199 

••May not be duplicated in Area I 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 106 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2 One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201; or ENG 222 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115, POS 113, ECO 201 20 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200, PSY101,DRS228 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201, MAT 220, HIS 251 or 252 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108,117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Additional Requirements 

Mav Be Exempted 5 

OSM 121 2 

OSM122 3 

G Teaching Concentration 

1. BAD 201, ACC 211, ACC 212 15 

2. BAD 225, ECO 202 10 

3. ACC 300, OSM 320, OSM 340, BAD 317, BAD 320, BAD 340 BAD 362, 

OSM 405, OSM 420 BAD 440 50 

D. Professional Sequence 32 

1. EDN 240 2 

2. EXC 310, EDN 335, BED 350 15 

3. EDN 471, 472, 473 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Exams 

Total 203 



214 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN SPEECH CORRECTION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 290, or 103, or 195, or 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. ANT 201 or ECO 201 or SOC 201 or ECO 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200;PSY101,295 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 228 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 55 

1. EXC 220, 225, 230, 315, 335 25 

2. EXC 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 420 30 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 15 

PSY 328 5 

PSY 302 5 

Approved elective 5 

D. Professional Sequence 30 

1. EXC 310 5 

2. EDN 335, 422, 471, 472, 473 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

NOTE: This program is listed in the Division of Physical Education and Athletics. 

Library Science/Media 

The Library Science /Media program has three emphases: (1) basic library skills 
courses and specialized skill courses designed to help students in specific subject areas 
develop research skills; (2) career courses for prospective media specialists and persons 
interested in public and special libraries; and (3) basic research courses which may be 
elected by majors in other areas. 

Certification Program 

The NS-4 in media is a non-renewable certificate that must be upgraded to an S-5 
(master's level) within five (5) years. 

Certification in Library Media may be obtained by completing 40 quarter hours in 
media and related courses with grades of "C" or better. This program must be incorpo- 
rated into an existing teaching major. The following courses are required for certification 
as a school library media specialist: 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 215 



Hours 

■\ i m nx) no 120 no 

B BDT l" 

c One oourae from EDN 124 118 BDN 123 5 

Non-Certification Program 

\ Itlldent ma\ ihoosc any field ol < OM nitration whii h allows I double BIAJOf I he 

nui|or in l ibrsry Media to i omprised of tin- following 

Hours 

•\ LM300 110 120,410,420,425 

BDN 240 451 CS296oi 115 10 12 

B One course from BDN 124 118 BDN423;DRS PLM 147 5 

IOIAI 4(142 

Library Media Minor 

\ student choosing to minor in Library Medici is required to complete the following 

courses with grades ot C or better in each: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 32D 12 

B. LM 410. 420, 42^ 13 

TOTAL 25 

Learning Disabilities Add-On 

Learning Disabilities (grades K-12) may be added to certification in elementary or 
middle school education by successful completion of the following courses: 
EXC 312 - Introduction to Learning Disabilities 
EXC 430 - Teaching Children with Disabilities 
EXC 340 - Behavior Management 
EDN 320 - Tests and Measurements 
EXC 315 - Language Development 

Education students interested in an endorsement in Learning Disabilities need to see 
a Special Education advisor in the Division of Education in order to identify the 
appropriate courses. 

The above "add-on" in LD would consist of a non-renewable provisional certificate at 
the T-4 level in Learning Disabilities. In order for the student to obtain a non-provisional 
certificate, other requirements, outlined by the State Department of Education would 
have to be satisfied. 

Course Offerings 

EDN Offerings 

EDN 200 Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5) 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a profession. The student 
engages in directed self-study and plans for the achievement of professional goals. 
Directed observation. 

EDN 201 Human Growth and Development (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

A survey of lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive, 
and social development. Understandings of growth and development are applied 
to classroom teaching and learning 

EDN 202 Health and the Young Child (3-0-3) 

Study of factors impacting upon the physical social and emotional health of young 
children, including food and nutrition, safety, disease and trauma. 



216 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDN 240 Education Media (1-2-2) 

Workshop experience in the selection, utilization, evaluation, and preparation of 
various kinds of media. Emphasis is placed on utilization of media in teaching. 

EDN 304 Childhood and Adolescence (4-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

An overview of the developmental process of children from birth through adoles- 
cence. Students will explore various factors which affect development and will 
examine the inter-relationship of school achievement and societal factors. A labo- 
ratory component will include use of school and community resources. 

EDN 320 Test and Measurements (5-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

A beginning course in measurement which covers statistical methods, research 
designs and research problems. Students are provided experiences in the adminis- 
tration and evaluation of psychological tests. 

EDN 324 Literature for Children (5-1-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of children's books and selections from books. Designed to assist future 
teachers in the selection of the best that has been written in the realm of children's 
literature for each period of the child's life. 

EDN 335 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; PSY 201 or EDN 202. 
The study of secondary school curriculum and methods. Detailed study is given to 
techniques of systematic observation, preparation of behavioral objectives, analy- 
sis of critical incidents, production of media materials, practices of classroom 
control, and examination of instruction models. Directed practicum. 

EDN 336 Elementary School Language Arts (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Designed to offer the student the opportunity to explore methods, content, and 
materials used in teaching the skills of communicative arts to children. Directed 
field experiences. 

EDN 342 Elementary School Social Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Focus upon fundamental social studies skills and processes needed by children. 

Directed observation. 

EDN 410 Independent Study (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Students conduct an in-depth, closely supervised instructor-approved study of a 
topic in education. The student is required to evidence skills in independent 
research and study. 

EDN 415 Adolescent Psychology (5-0-5) 

Focus on the phenomenon of modern adolescence. Emphasis upon the intellectual, 
cultural and personal transitions of the adolescent period. 

EDN 418 Literature for the Middle School Learner (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Provides opportunity for prospective and inservice teachers to explore multimedia 
offerings of literary value and of significance to age level of learners found in the 
middle school. Relates literature to all areas of the middle school curriculum. 

EDN 422 The Teaching of Reading K-4 (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Study of the developmental reading program. Emphasis will be placed on reading 

skills, approaches, techniques, materials and evaluation for classroom use. 

EDN 423 Adolescent Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of significant literature appropriate for adolescents. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 217 



i d\ 424 Pi n c tl c m n In Individual (tending Instruction (2 I Q 
Prerequisite BDN4 

Dctigncd (*> pii>\ Idc PFO S peJ ti\ »■ tea< hers with dim ted pr.n tn «• in the teai I 

reading Special emphasis w ill be placed upon diagnosis .uui tea< King ol i • 

reading skills Students will be required to tutor .it icist one remedial readei 

I >iii\ ted Beld expei lew i 
I D\ 42S Methods tor reaching Rending In the Middle School 4 (S-O-S) 

Prerequisite Admission to reachet Education 

Pi un.it \ tiHih upon reading as i tool ti>i extending teaming In the content sn 

the middle m hool 
ll)\ 430 Diagnosing and Prescribing for Learning Problems (5-0-5) 

Pierequisite EDN 422 m 428 

Diagnostk end prest ripti\ e pre* ess prim tples underiying nmxcsamcnl and i one 

tion oi learning 

problems I designed to help the classroom teacher 1 1 1 determine performaiM e levels 

end needs of pupils and (2) provide effective learning assistant e 

EDN 432 Methods and Materials for K-4 (5-2-5) 

Prerequisites Admission to Teacher Education. 

Examination of teaching resources, teaching strategies and the range of mterper- 

sonaJ relationships involved in teaching young children. Dire< ted field experiences. 

EDN 434 Methods and Curriculum of Elementary Life Science (5-0-5) 
P rereq u isite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Interpretation ot life science for elementary school teaching: exploration of pro- 
cesses for translating meaning into classroom practice, emphasis upon inquiry, the 
discovery process and other science teaching strategies. 

EDN 435 Methods and Curriculum of Elementary Physical Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Interpretation of physical science for elementary school teaching including explo- 
ration of processes for translating meaning into classroom practice, with emphasis 
upon the discovery process and other science teaching strategies. 

EDN 436 Curriculum and Teaching K-4 (5-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course is the study of early elementary curricula, existing administrative and 
instructional organizations, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
at the primary level (K-4). It includes study and development of teaching materials 

EDN 438 Curriculum and Teaching (4-8) (5-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course is the study of Middle School curricula, existing administrative and 
instructional organizations, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
at the middle school level (4-8). It includes study and development of teaching 
materials. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 439 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, English (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or EDN 201 and admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of secondary school English curriculum with emphasis upon materials 

and methods of teaching English. Directed observation. 

EDN 441 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: MAT 260. 

The study of secondary school mathematics curriculum with emphasis upon 

materials and methods of teaching mathematics. Directed observations. 

EDN 445 Reading In the Secondary School (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to provide students with the rationale for teaching reading 
as they teach their content areas in the secondary school. 



218 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDN 447 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Science (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, PSY 201 or EDN 201, and EDN 335. 
The study of secondary school science curriculum with emphasis upon materials 
and methods of teaching science. Directed observations. 

EDN 449 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; PSY 201 or EDN 201 and EDN 335. 
The study of secondary school social science curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teaching social science. Directed observations. 

EDN 450 The Middle School (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

An overview of the history and purpose of the middle school; characteristics of the 
middle school learner, emphasis upon the nature and role of the middle school 
teacher and upon appropriate programs and methods for the needs of middle 
school learners. 

EDN 451 Teaching Media (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 240 or permission of instructor. 

Laboratory course in designing and producing instructional media: transparencies, 

slides, tapes and other media for teaching. 

EDN 460 Multi-Cultural Education (5-0-5) 

Designed to study the educational implications of cultural diversity. Examination 
of the school programs designed to meet the needs and interests of children from 
different ethnic backgrounds. 

EDN 471 Student Teaching— Knowledge of Content (O-V-5) 

EDN 472 Student Teaching — Instructional Methods and Materials (O-V-5) 

EDN 473 Student Teaching— Professional/ Interpersonal Skills (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: See "General Requirements: Teacher Education Programs." Students 
are placed in selected schools for one quarter as full-time student staff members. No 
additional credit hours may be earned while student teaching. Classroom experi- 
ences and other staff responsibilities are jointly supervised by the college staff, 
supervising teachers and principals in the selected schools. Open to transient 
students only with permission of the Division of Education at Armstrong and of the 
college from which the student comes. 

EDN 481/482 

/483 Internship (0-V-1 to 5) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences; 
criteria for meeting prerequisites are on file in the Director's office. 
Students who hold teaching positions in school and /or clinic settings will be 
supervised by College staff members for one academic year. Supervisors will 
observe and hold conferences with each candidate. Students must complete one 
academic year to receive credit. 

Exceptional Children Offerings 

EXC 220 Introduction to Communicative Disorders (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the types, etiologies, and remediation sources and techniques of 
various communicative dysfunctions in children and adults in the areas of lan- 
guage, articulation, voice and stuttering. Emphasis is on the recognition and 
awareness of these disorders, appropriate classroom strategies, and treatment 
referral. 

EXC 225 Phonetics for Speech Correctionists (3-5) 

Deals with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in speech correc- 
tion, IPA transcription of normal and defective articulation and the important 
characteristics of regional dialects are stressed. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 219 



I \c 2 |Q \ n.i tuin \ utd Physiology «>t tin- Speech ind Hearing 
Mcchaiutin (5 I) 

tnatom) tnd physiolog) ol the head r\e< k ind thorax from •> speei l> and hi 
standpoint Spei lal emphasia ki plai ed »>n ham nonal considerations of the ri 
tory Systran larynx oral and nsssl stmcturai tndi 

\ \c mo Introduction to I KceptionaJ ( hildren (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite BDN 200 and PSi 201 oi I DN 201 

\n orientation to exceptional i Kildren with emphasis on educational implications 
and rehabilitation requirements In< ludes i lassroom disi ussion ol and \ isitationa 
to fa< ilities for training 

EXC 312 introduction to l earning Disabilities (4-2*5) 
rYerequisite- EXC MO. 

An introduction to the area oi specifk learning disabilities! with an emphasii <>n 
Identification terminology! and prevalence 

EXC SIS Normal Speech and Language Development (4-2-5) 

I he itudy ol normal language de\ elopment with emphasis on oral language I His 
course traces developmental m ales ol speei h and language growth a< rose i ariouf 
age levels and Includes tlu- relationship between speech and language Observa 

tions 

EXC 335 Speech Science (5-0-5) 

speech communication From a psychophysical standpoint. Study fcx uses on acous- 
tics! physics ol speech, transmission media, and physical analysis ol speech. 

EXC 340 Behavior Management for the Exceptional Child (5-0-5) 

\ study ol the application of behavioral principles for the management and growth 
ot exceptional learners. Consultation in using the principles with other tea< hers and 
with parents will also be emphasized. 

EXC 410 Introduction to Audiology (4-2-5) 

Prere q uisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

An introduction to the methods ot hearing assessment through pure tone and 
speech audiometry, with a focus on rehabilitation of the hearing impaired. Super- 
vised clinical practice. 

EXC 411 Stuttering (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

An introduction to the problem of stuttering, its possible causes and the manage- 
ment training of cases. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 412 Language Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

An introduction to language disorders of children and adults. Etiologies, evalua- 
tion procedures, and therapeutic approaches are studied. Major emphasis will be 
given to delayed language development Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 413 Organically Based Communication Problems (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The course includes a study of the communication problems related to disorders of 
voice, cleft palate, and cerebral palsy. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 415 Articulation Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 225, admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of the etiology, rationale, evaluation, and methods of therapy tor d isorders 
of articulation. The course includes the development oi a therapeutic program, 
lesson plans, and supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 420 Public School Program Administration (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Administration and implementation of public school speech therapy programs 
including identification, case load selection, scheduling, inservice, and relationship 
of speech therapy to the total school program. Supervised clinical practicum. 



220 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EXC 422 Manual Language for the Deaf (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Offered on demand. 
A study of the practices, procedures and methods in teaching manual language to 
the deaf, with a review of the historical philosophies and current trends and 
literature. At the conclusion of the course the student will have a working ability to 
communicate with a manual deaf individual as well as the ability to teach deaf 
children the process of manual language. 

EXC 430 Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities (34-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 213, Introduction to Learning Disabilities and EDN 422, The 
Teaching of Reading; admission to Teacher Education. 

Teaching strategies for children with specific learning disabilities. A focus on 
approaches, techniques, and materials with directed application. 

Library Media Offerings 

LM 300 Introduction to Media Profession (2-0-2) 

An introductory course in which students examine the role, functions and services 
of different types of libraries and information centers. Emphasizes the role and 
responsibilities of librarians /media specialists. Includes also the social role of 
libraries and library networks. The student is given an opportunity to be involved 
in public, school, and special libraries during field experience. 

LM 310 Reference Sources (5-0-5) 

Study of basic reference sources, including searching strategies. The course has two 
phases: (1) study and evaluation of major types of references and information 
sources; (2) study of specific sources of information in elementary and secondary 
schools as well as specific sources for a subject field. Directed field experiences. 

LM 320 Cataloging and Classification (5-0-5) 

Introduction to the basic principles of cataloging and classification of multimedia 
materials combined with practical experience. Dewey Decimal and Library of 
Congress Classification; Sears and Library of Congress Subject headings; and 
AACR2. Both manual and automated methods are stressed. Problems peculiar to 
the media specialist are considered. Practical experience is also offered. 

LM 410 Media Selection (3-0-3) 

Winter. 

Selection of various types of media, based on fundamental principles and objec- 
tives. The course has three phases: (1) selection criteria, source lists and their use in 
media selection, publishing, and order processing; (2) selection and evaluation of 
media for children considering curricular considerations and understanding of the 
media specialist's responsibilities toward guidance in media; and (3) selection and 
evaluation of media for young adults considering curricular correlations and 
enrichment; recreational and developmental needs; young adult services and 
programs. Includes field experiences. 

LM 420 Administration of Information Centers (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410. 

Study of organization and administration of all types of information centers 
including administering the budget, purchase of materials, personnel, circulation, 
equipment, routines and schedules, maintenance of the collection, preventive 
maintenance and minor repairs of equipment, and relations with administration 
and users will be considered. Students will examine the role of the media specialist 
in the curriculum process and media center instruction and orientation. 
School library media philosophies and educational objectives will also be exam- 
ined. Concurrent enrollment in Media Internship is recommended. 

LM 425 Media Internship (0-12-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410, with a grade of "C" or 
higher and concurrent enrollment in LM 420. 

Supervised experience in library media center, or other appropriate setting. Stu- 
dents must complete 120 clock hours of work. Offered on a pass/ fail basis. 
Application for the Internship must be made at least one quarter in advance. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 221 



NOT1 (The following librar\ s<. leiue tout • immiMrred h\ the I )irei tor of 

Library Services and are taught b) professional library Eacult) I 

Library Science Offerings 

IS 1 11) hit rod in QOn ti> I ibran Research ami Materials ( 1-0-1) 

•\n orientation to the Ubrar) librar) terminolog) sean h str.it«>;\ formation, and 
majoi library tAds such as the card catalog classification and subjeel I" 
guides periodical Indexes and abstracts, encyclopedias, dictionaries, aim i 
handbooks and \ earbooks rr\ lew %, and < riti< isms and btographk .»l soun es I his 
course wiU provide students with opportunities to learn how t»> m * est information 
In i variet) oi formats so thai they ». an i ontinue life-long learning, dire* ted to thr 
individual student s subject interest 

1 s Ml Principles of 1 ibrary Research and Materials (1-0-1) 

Stud) ot two separate but complementary aspects <>t library research, re sear ch 
methodology and r esea rch tools rhe methodology section addresses the wty in 
whkh .1 research paper is written, from the selection ot a topk to the paper's final 
bibliogra p hy rhe study ot tools Focuses on various print, non-print and on-line 
resources and services available to the student preparing a scholarly paper Nurs 

ing and allied health resources are emphasized 

LS 312 Information Resources In the Humanities (1-0-1) 

Extensive Stud) ot basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques 
in the humanities 

LS 313 Information Resources In the Social Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive Study oi basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques 

in the social sciences 
LS 314 Information Resources In the Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive Study ot basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques 

in the sciences. 

SSC Business Education Offerings 

NOTE The following courses are requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Education 
in Business Education offered cooperatively with Savannah State College. 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting 1. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 110, BAD 201. 

The fundamental concepts and procedures of accounting are studied with empha- 
sis both on rationale and technique. The elements of accounting, the accounting 
evele, and financial statement presentation are covered in depth for the transactions 
oi a merchandising firm. Computer Aided Instruction (CAD will be utilized 
wherever applicable. 

ACC 212 Principles of Accounting II. (5-0-5) 
Prerequisites: ACC 211. 

Continuation of ACC 211 with emphasis on partnership and corporate financial 
reporting. Coverage also includes basic accounting concepts in job order and 
process costing, the statement of changes in financial position and interpretation oi 
financial statements. Computer Aided Instruction (CAD will be used wherever 
appropriate. 

ACC 300 Managerial Accounting. (5-0-5) 
Prerequisites: ACC 211, ACC 21 2 

Study, interpretation, and analysis of accounting data as used in the decision 
making process of business and not-for-profit organizations 

BAD 201 Introduction to Information Systems. (3-5) 

Prerequisite: OSM 121 or keyboarding proficiency. 

A concepts and tools course; includes study of information processing concepts and 
history; familiarization with terminals and microcomputers; developing introduc- 
tory level proficiency with a micro based spreadsheet, word processor and filer 
package. 



222 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BAD 225 Business Communications and Report Writing. (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: ENG 109. 

The application of basic principles of English grammar, basic report writing, and 
research techniques to presentations and written communications as demanded in 
business. The role of written communications in relation to news media enters into 
the consideration given to communication theory. 

BAD 317 Legal Environment of Business. (5-0-5) 

A study of legal rights, social forces and government regulations affecting business; 
an in depth study of the law of contracts; the law of personal property and 
bailments. 

BAD 320 Principles of Business Finance. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BAD 331. 

Principles, problems, and practices associated with the financial management of 
business institutions; nature and types of equity financing; major types of short- 
term and long-term debt; capitalization; financial statements, working capital 
requirements, reorganization; bankruptcy; methods of intercorporate financing. 

BAD 340 Principles of Marketing. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The distribution of goods, and services from producers to consumers, market 
methods employed in assembling, transporting, storage, sales, and risk taking; 
analysis of the commodity, brands, sales methods and management; advertising 
plans and media. 

BAD 362 Organizational Theory and Behavior. (5-0-5) 

Basic principles and functions of management, with emphasis on the process of 
integrating people into the work situation so that they work together productively 
and with economic, psychological, and social satisfaction. 

BAD 440 Management Information Systems. (5-0-5) 

Total information system for managerial strategy, planning, and control. Informa- 
tion management, the systems approach, storage and data bases, functional 
information systems, information systems development. 

BED 350 Methods of Teaching Business. (5-0-5) 

Offered Winter Quarter, Odd years. 

An analysis of specialized methods used to teach business subjects on the second- 
ary level. Includes basic principles and curriculum structure of general and vocational 
business education. 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro-Economics. (5-0-5) 

Basic economic concept, with emphasis on the role of government; national income 
and products; business cycles; money and banking; fiscal and monetary policy, and 
international trade. 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro-Economics. (5-0-5) 

Basic economic concepts continued from 201. Factors of production; supply and 
demand; determination of prices and of income; monopolies; the problem of 
economic growth; and comparative economic systems. 

OSM 121 Keyboarding for Information Processing. (1-2-2) 

Introductory course covering alphanumeric keyboarding skills for students who 
intend to use typewriters, microcomputers, word processors, computer terminals, 
and other types of information processing equipment. Student may take a profi- 
ciency test to exempt. 

OSM 122 Keyboarding Applications for Business. (22-3) 
Prerequisite: keyboarding proficiency. 

For students who have had one or two semesters of high school typewriting (or 
OSM 121) and are able to touch type. Course covers formatting of documents, 
including letters, manuscripts, and tables. Introduction to production keyboard- 
ing. Minimum passing speed: 35 words a minute on five-minute timed writings. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 



223 



os\i |2C tdvancad Ktvboarding Applications 0-4-5) 
Prerequisite ( 6M 
Purthei skill development in production >>t office documenti Includes machine 

transcription Minimum passing speed »0 words pet minute 

OSM 340 Word PtQCfMJng ( MlCCptl and I eihnupj. 

I he dm etopmenl oi bash concept! ind operational u\ hniques on sell 
processing units typewriting proficienc) required 

OSM 405 Information j^d Recordi Management (5-05) 

iiion maintenance ind disposition ol records Including hard copy ind «•!•■< 
tronk medii Indexing rules snd procedures; records mana g ement pre 
Including inventory, retention snd disposition s< hedules; vital recordf prota lion 
the managemenl of electronk Hies, micrographics, .hum- and Inactive n 
control are major components of tlu- course 

OSM 420 Office Information Systems. (5-0-5) 

I rends and issues In office automation. A study of information processing fuiu 
turns focusing on the integration and management ot automated ofnee systems The 
organizational concept; tne traditional and emerging office; ( rtaracteristk sot major 
support systems; mfbrmation/data/user interface; analysis and design; future 
office systems 



Division of Physical Education and Athletics 



Faculty 

Counsil, Roger, Division Head 

Lariscy, Michael, Coordinator of Knorr, Virginia 

Physical Education Programs Koth, Andreas 

Aenchbacher, Eddie Roberts, Lynn 

Ford, Betty Tapp, Lawrence 

Goals and Objectives 

The mission of the Division of Physical Education and Athletics is to provide a range 
of academic, service and athletic programs in an intellectually, physically, and socially 
stimulating environment. To accomplish these goals, the objectives of the various units 
of the Division of Physical Education and Athletics are: 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: 

To provide depth and breadth of content, pedagogy and practical application in the 
preparation of subject matter for both health and physical education. 

To provide knowledge of health and educational concepts and principles, and their 
applications in an educational environment and society. 

To develop competency in using the processes of health and phvsical education in a 
broad range of activities to include research, laboratory skills, and field experiences. 

To develop a positive attitude toward health and physical education, and the motiva- 
tion to participate in a wholesome program of health-enhancing activities. 

To demonstrate the ability to teach health and physical education processes, attitudes, 
and content to learners representing a wide range of abilities from various socioeconomic 
and ethnic backgrounds. 

To gain the necessary knowledge of the learning process and broad range of instruc- 
tional strategies and materials, with proper selection best suited for a given teaching and 
learning situation. 

To demonstrate an understanding of the goals and objectives of the overall educa- 
tional system, and how health and physical education relates to these broader purposes. 



224 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION SERVICE PROGRAM: 

To provide a wide variety of offerings that focus upon life-long physical activities. 

To develop knowledge, basic skills and appreciation of recreational sports and 
activities. 

To provide instruction which will certify and qualify students in the areas of aquatics 
and safety, first aid and CPR. 

To provide basic instruction in personal health practices and behaviors. 

THE INTRAMURAL PROGRAM: 

To provide opportunities for participation, regardless of ability, in a wide variety of 
sports and recreational activities to the entire college community. 

To provide an opportunity to develop friendships, to increase physical fitness, and to 
use leisure time wisely. 

To foster a spirit of sportsmanship and fair play among all participants and spectators. 

THE INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC PROGRAM: 

To provide the opportunity for student-alumni to participate in an intercollegiate 
athletic program. 

To furnish a spectator sports program for the students and general public which in 
turn will provide a public relations opportunity for the college. 

To provide an environment for learning and enjoyment regardless of whether a 
student is a participant or a spectator. 

THE COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERVICE PROGRAM: 

To offer a range of activities designed to appeal to the community. 

To utilize the campus gymnasium and field facilities to enhance the community image 

of the college. 

To provide an environment of learning and enjoyment for the participants. 

Teacher Education Program 

General stipulations affecting the undergraduate teacher education programs at 
Armstrong State College are found in the Division of Education section. The stipulations 
for teacher education programs apply to all students in all teacher education programs. 
Refer specifically to those seven sections of the catalog in the Division of Education 
section entitled: Admission to Teacher Education, Recommendation for Certification, 
Liability Insurance Requirement, September Practicum, Student Teaching, Exit Exam, 
and Program Completion. 

Required Activity Courses 

During the freshman year, all students should take PE 1 1 7 (Basic Health) or 166 (Safety 
and First Aid) and 103, 108, 203, 311, or 316 (Swimming). During the sophomore year, 
students may elect any three Physical Education activity courses. Students unable to 
participate in the regular program should plan an alternate program with the Coordina- 
tor of the Physical Education Programs. Students should note the Physical Education 
Requirements section located in the Academic Policies and Information section of the 
catalog. 

Swimming Exemption 

A student who can show cause (a physical handicap for example) to be exempted from 
the swimming requirement should make an appointment with the Coordinator of the 
Physical Education Programs. A student may request a swimming test to exempt 
swimming and to substitute another activity course through the Coordinator of the 
Physical Education Program. Exemption tests are administered the first two days each 
quarter. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 225 



Advisement 

\:n student who eta larea ph) si< al edu< ation as his Kei majoi is assigned an adi is<>r 
who is t i faculty membei A c onf erence should be scheduled to determin< 
conditions and requirements the student must meet in order to complete the d< 
certification objectives it is tin- responsibility oi the student to initiate and maintain the 
advisement pro< ess 

Transfer of Courses 

Pro> isions tor transfer oi »> redits are delineated In the A*< ademk Regulations set bVoti 
ot tin* catalog rhe procedure for transferring c Ails courses is published in me 
Graduate set rion oi the catalog. 

Bachelor of Science in Education in 
Health and Physical Education 

The Bachelor oi Science Degree in Education with a Major in Health and Physical 
Education provides me student with a degree leading to teacher certification K 12 in the 
areas ot Health and Physical Education The program is approved by me National 
Council tor Accreditation ot Teacher Education (\CATE)and the Georgia State Depart- 
ment ot Education. Students selecting this major should seek advisement in the Division 
Oi Physical Education and Athletics. Students pursuing this degree should refer to the 
readier Certification section of the catalog to find those stipulations affecting all 
undergraduate education programs at Armstrong State College 

Progression Requirements: 

1. Successful completion ot basic core requirements 
a General Requirements 

b. Regents Exam 

2. Application for Admission to Major Program 

a. Departmental Advisor Assigned 

b. Program of Study Established 

3. Application for Admission to Teacher Education (2.5 G.P.A. required) 

a. Media Competency Completion 

b. September practicum 

c. Application for Student Teaching Assignment 

4. Successful Completion of Departmental Requirements 

a. All additional major courses 

b. Proficiency tests 

c. TCT 

5. Application for Graduation 

Physical Education Minor 

The minor in physical education requires 25 credit hours with grades of "C" or better. 
The student will select 25 hours from the following courses: 

1. PE 210, 216, 217, 219, 311, 413, 421, PEM 250, 251, 252, 351, 352. 

2. No more than two courses from: PE 212, 213, 214 or 215. 
See course offerings for the description of courses. 



226 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN EDUCATION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 103 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272,273; ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS113 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, DRS 228, PSY 101 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. HIS 251 or HIS 252 5 

4. CS 115 or CS 120 5 

AreaV 5 

Five hours of activity courses 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 69 

1. PE 103, 108, 203, 311, or 316 1 

2. PE166 2 

3. PEM 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355 48 

4. HE 260, 261, 262, 360 and H.S. 420 18 

C. Professional Sequence 33 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

2. HE 460 , 5 

D. Electives 8 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 197 

Physical Education Offerings 

SPECIAL NOTE: 

Swimming is required of all students as part of their 6 hours of physical education. 
Students with a valid LifeGuarding, WSI, or Open Water Diver certificate or who have 
passed the Armstrong swimming test may be exempted from the swimming require- 
ment. Students able to swim in deep water should register for P.E. 108. If in doubt as to 
proper course, consult one of the Division's swimming instructors BEFORE REGISTER- 
ING. All courses designated PEM are required of majors. 

PE 100 Beginning Weight Training (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Emphasis on developing physical fitness through a variety of fundamental weight 

training exercises. Introduction of mechanical principles 

and techniques necessary for the understanding of weight training programs. Only 

one of PE 100 or PE 204 may count as an activity course toward the six hours of 

required physical education. 

PE 101 Lifetime Fitness (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Basic fitness concepts and their application to our everyday life. Students will 
participate in an individualized program of aerobic activity and lectures on fitness 
and nutrition. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 227 



Ummi Sports u) M) 

Kill Wiiiifi Spring 

t. onsists ol two o( the following sports basketball, volleyball and s.. it kill 

Basil Swimming Skills (0-3-1) 

kill Wintei Spring Summei (PI iiim H6inay to substituted for PE 103 or 106) 

skills and strokes km tin- student unfamiliai with oa .itr.iui <>i the watei ind who 

cannot swim Satisfies Armstrong sw Imming requirement 

Bowling (0-2-n 

Fall Wintei Spring Summei 

Basi< skills m bowling Minimum oi tun games required pet dass period .it 

student 9 expense Must prm ide own transportation 

Badminton (O-2-i ) 

Pall Wintei Spring, Summer 

Bask skills m badminton Student must provide own racquet 

Beginning Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Wintei 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning tumbling and gymnastk apparatus 

Trampoline (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Hie teaching o( the pr op er care and use of the trampoline. Under strict supervision, 

the student learns to perform basic skills. 

Intermediate Swimming (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 31 1 or the American Red Cross WSI course may 

be substituted for PE 103 or 108). 

Six basic strokes, skills, endurance and knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or 

about water Satisfies swimming requirement. 

Intermediate Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

W inter. Prerequisite: PE 10b or permission of instructor. 

Continuation of PE 106 with additional practice of tumbling and gymnastic appa- 
ratus 

Officiating of Football (2-2-2) 

Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience in officiating 

intramural games, approved community recreation games, and public school 

games. Students must provide own equipment and transportation. 

Students must provide own whistles, hats and transportation to any off campus 

assignment. 

Officiating of Basketball (2-2-2) 
Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience in officiating 
in class games, intramural games, approved community recreation games and 
public school games. Elective credit. 

Student must provide own whistle and transportation to any off-campus assign- 
ment. 

Basic Health (2-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

A basic course in health education with emphasis on personal health. 

Officiating Team Sports (2-2-2) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the rules, mechanics and ethics 

involved in officiating a variety of team sports activities. The student will develop 

a fundamental understanding of the rules and proper application of mechanics 

associated with the following: Basketball, Baseball, Football, Soccer, Softball and 

Volleyball. 

Student must provide own equipment appropriate to the sports and transportation 

for off-campus assignment. 



228 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 166 Safety and First Aid (3-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
The American Red Cross advanced course in safety and first aid and adult CPR. 
Required of majors. To receive a certification card, students must pay an adminis- 
trative tee to the American Red Cross. 

PE 167 Community First Aid and Stress Management For The Law 

Enforcement Officer (3-1-3) 

Summer 

This course is designed to provide the student with American Red Cross First Aid 
and CPR Certification. Stress management skills of particular significance to the 
law enforcement officer will be an integral part of the course. Students will be 
required to pay an administrative fee to the American Red Cross. 

PE 200 Archery (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in archery for recreational use. Students must provide own arm and 

fingerguards. 

PE 201 Elementary Tennis (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in tennis. Student must provide own racquet and one can of new tennis 

balls. 

PE 202 Racquetball (0-2-1 ) 

Designed to develop enthusiasm and appreciation for the game of racquetball. 
Course content will include strokes, strategy, forms of play, rules, equipment, 
safety and etiquette. Classes held off campus. Students must provide transporta- 
tion. Additional fee is required. 

PE 203 Beginning Scuba (0-3-1) 

Prerequisite: Tread 10 minutes, swim 200 yards any style. 
Equips student to engage in beginning recreational scuba diving activities in local 
aquatic environments. Topics covered include: adapting to the underwater world, 
underwater communications, dive planning, diving equipment, boat diving, health 
for diving, dive tables, marine life identification, and the underwater environment. 
Additional fee is required. 

PE 204 Advanced Weight Training (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 100 or permission of instructor. 
Emphasis on continued development of physical fitness through a variety of 
advanced weight training exercises. Improvement of maximal muscular strength 
and endurance in the main muscle groups of the body through progressive 
resistance exercises. Only one of PE 100 or PE 204 may count as an activity course 
toward the six hours of required physical education. 

PE 205 Folk Square, Social Dancing (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Instruction and practice in many forms of folk, square, and social dancing. 

PE 206 Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Introduction to the art of modern dance. Includes technique, exercise, basic impro- 
visation, dance positions, and locomotor movement. 

PE 208 Golf (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic techniques and instruction for the beginning golfer. Minimum of 18 holes of 
golf must be played outside of class at student's expense. Must provide six shag 
balls for class and transportation. 

PE 209 Intermediate Modern Dance (0-2-1 ) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 206 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of PE 206 with emphasis on dynamics, composition, and choreog- 
raphy. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 229 



P re ven tion and I raaftmcnfl of Athletic [njuriet (2-l«2) 

WlIlt.M 

I heory and practice o4 raring foi ind preventing Injuries relating rrj oi 

iporti Studenti required to assist m liberator) e xp e r iences urith tr.-.itm. 

preventive training through tin' athletic Intramural or physical education pro 

grama Student must pro\ Ide o%* n athletfc tape 

c aachlng Football (3-0-2) 

Fall 

[nstruction ind practice In fundamental skills and team play, coaching courses is 

required ot majors Minimum oi two games must be scouted .it student 

Coaching Basketball (3-0-2) 

WuuVi 

[nstruction and practice m fundamental skills and team play, emphasizing meth- 
ods and JrilK used by leading coa< lies One of the < oa< King courses is required oi 
majors Minimum oi two ^mu's must be scouted .it student's e x pe ns e 
Coaching Baseball and Softball (3-0-2) 
Spring 

[nstruction and practice In fundamental skills and team play emphasizing methods 
and drills used by loading coaches. One of the coaching uuirM-s is required oi 
majors Minimum oi two games must be scouted at student's expense 

Coaching Volleyball and Soccer (3-0-2) 
Spring 

Introduction to the rules and fundamental skills of volleyball and soccer. Indi- 
vidual development and application of successful coaching methods. Coaching 
methods will include acquisition of sound organizational practices and under- 
standing of various coaching types. 

Basic Games (2-0-1) 

Spring. 

Designed to acquaint student with the various categories of games, the appropri- 
ateness for each type of various age levels, proper progressions, and the best ways 
to use games teach physical skills, emotional and social skills, and actual sports 
skills. 

Techniques of Dance (2-0-1) 

Winter. 

Overview of the art of dance and its various categories. Stresses similarities and 
differences in form, technique and history of the ballet modern dance, jazz dance, 
ballroom dance, square dance, aerobic dance and folk dance with emphasis on 
teaching and techniques. 

Techniques of Safety In Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 106. 

Course designed to give majors thorough understanding of the basic principles of 
spotting in gymnastics to assure maximum safety for learners as well as proper 
teaching progressions and lead-up skills necessary at each level of learning. 

Principles of Sports Training (2-1 -2) 

Study of the basic principles, methods and characteristics associated with a variety 
of sports. Students will develop and participate in a variety oi training and 
nutritional programs used in sport settings. 

Introduction to Physical Education (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the subdisciplines of physical education. Studv will include a 
survey of historical foundations, relationships between health and physical educa- 
tion, professional skills, and career opportunities. 

lntramurals and Recreation (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to prepare the student to organize and administer intramu- 
ral and recreational sports activities for elementary and secondary schools, for the 
college level and for the community. Activities range from canoeing to horseshoes. 
Students are required to participate in field experiences and observations. Trans- 
portation must be supplied by the student. 



230 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PEM 252 Human Anatomy and Kinesiology in Physical Education (5-0-5) 

A survey of selected systems of the body and the analysis of movement and 
application of mechanical principles in physical education activity. 

PEM 253 Individual and Dual Sports (3-5) 

Designed to acquaint student with the various individual and dual sports. The 
student will analyze and gain practice in teaching activities such as: archery 
badminton, bicycling, bowling, fencing, fitness, golf, hiking, backpacking, racketball 
tennis and weight training. 

PEM 254 Team Sports Curriculum (3-4-5) 

Designed for the enhancement of sports skills and for the analysis and practice in 
teaching these skills. Team sports include: basketball, field hockey, flag/tag foot- 
ball, soccer, softball, speedball and volleyball. 

PE 300 Psycho-Social Aspects of Sports (5-0-5) 

Study of the research relevant to sports behavior and performance. The student wil 
be provided with knowledge about various psycho-social factors and influences ii 
sports settings. 

PE 311 Lifeguard Training (1-2-2) 

Prerequisite: American Red Cross Standard First Aid and CPR certification, 500 
yard continuous swim, and proficiency in basic water skills. 
This course parallels the certification qualifications for the American Red Cross 
Lifeguard Training course, covering such topics as: recognizing and responding tc 
aquatic mishaps: pool health, sanitation, and management; spinal injury manage- 
ment. Timed swims required to pass. 

PE 316 Swimming Methods and Techniques (2-2-2) 

Prerequisite: Minimum 17 years old, current Safety, First Aid, and CPR. 
This course parallels the certification qualifications for American Red Cross Water 
Safety Instructor, covering the methods of teaching Infant and Pre-School Aquatics 
Whales Tales, the seven levels of "learn to swim program," as well as Basic Water 
Safety, Emergency Water Safety, IHSE and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. 

PE 320 Health and Physical Education for the Elementary School Teacher (5-0-5 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 
Theory and current practice in the teaching of health and physical education at the 
elementary school level. Designed to meet the requirement for elementary certifi- 
cation. Directed field experience included. 

PE 345 Athletic Injuries I (3-4-5) 

Introduction to the assessment, care and prevention of lower extremity injuries 
Specifically, sports related injuries to feet, toes, knee, lower leg, thigh, hip anc 
pelvis will be studied. 

PE 346 Athletic Injuries II (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 345 or permission of instructor. 

Introduction to the assessment, care and prevention of upper extremity injuries 
Specifically, sports related injuries to the axial skeleton, shoulder girdle, elbow, 
wrist, hand and fingers, and injuries to the solid and hollow organs will be studied. 

PEM 351 Measurement and Evaluation In Health, Physical Education (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Math 220. 

Lectures, laboratory and field experience in the development, evaluation and 
application of tests in health and physical education. Students will learn to utilize 
computer software for instructional and administrative purposes. 

PEM 352 Physiology of Exercise (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 252. 

A study of body systems and their reactions to various types and levels of exercise. 
Study will include parts and functions of systems most involved in the exercise 
process. Students will investigate various components of physical fitness, weight 
control, and exercise prescription. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 231 



im \i 153 i ItmtnUf) School Physical I ducatton 1 1 I \) 

lheor\ .iiul CUimtl pi.utwr m tin- teaching ol < liiiuiit.il \ physical education 

Including developmental tumblin] baa* movemenl patterns 

fundamental and creative rhythmit activitiea activities related t" health I 
and beau ^>ii pattern development Multfc ultural consideration! In plannii 
Implementing idequate elementary physical education programs t«> meet th«- 
needs and interests ol .ill itudenti will he explored Directed field e xp erie n ce 
nn luded i. >pen to majors only 

im \i 154 Middle School Physical i dvcation <4-2^> 
P rere q uisite PI \i 

rheory and current practice In tin' tea< hing ol middle school physical education 
including pin si< a I fitness co n cept s and activities, rhythmk and dance activities, 
individual partnei group games, lead up and modified Individual dual team 
sports Multicultural considerations in planning and implementing adequate middle 
school physical education programs to meet the needs and interests of .ill students 
will be explored I Hre< ted field experieiM e in< luded 

PEM 355 Secondary School Physical Education (4-2-5) 
Prerequisite PI M 

rhe study oi curricular methods! media and assessment ol secondary physical 
education pro g r a ms as they apply to the developmental levels ol the second a i 
student Multicultural considerations in planning and implementing adequate 
secondary physical education programs to meet the needs and interests ol -ill 
students will be explored. Directed field experience included 

PE 364 Physical Education for the Exceptional Child (3-2-5) 

Student is introduced to methods of identifying and programming tor the excep- 
tional child. 

PEM 413 Special Topics In Physical Education (5-0-5) 
Fall. Prerequisite: PEM 351. 

R esea rc h methods in health and physical education. Allows students an opportu- 
nity tor indepth pursuit into areas of their interests. Open to majors only Required 

of majors 

PE 421 Management of Sports Programs (5-0-5) 

Designed to apply principles of management to a variety ol sports settings. 
Management applications tor school, municipal, and proprietary sports organiza- 
tions will be examined. 



232 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 







234 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



International Intercultural Studies Program 

The International Intercultural Studies Program (IISP) of the University System of 
Georgia provides students with a multitude of opportunities to study abroad while 
earning academic credit toward completion of degree requirements at their home 
campus. The IISP currently offers summer study abroad programs in Western Europe, 
the Soviet Union, Israel, Canada, and Mexico, and quarter, semester, and academic year 
opportunities in several countries in Western Europe. In 1989 approximately 350 partici- 
pants enrolled in one of these programs. 

Studying abroad enables students to increase knowledge of a foreign language, 
provides the opportunity to gain insights into and appreciation for the cultures and 
institutions of other peoples, facilitates the development of relevant career skills, and 
contributes to personal maturity, a sense of independence, self-knowledge, and confi- 
dence. 

IISP programs are open to all undergraduate students with a minimum cumulative 
GPA of 2.5; however, certain programs may require a higher GPA and completion of 
prerequisites. Graduate students are required to have a 3.0 GPA. Students in the 
University System of Georgia who are eligible for financial aid may use that aid toward 
IISP programs. A limited number of scholarships are available from some System 
institutions. For further information, see the Vice President and Dean of Faculty, or 
contact the IISP directly at 1 Park Place South Building, Suite 817, Atlanta, GA 30303. 
Telephone: 404-651-2450. 

The Freshman Experience 

Freshman Orientation Program 

In order to assist freshman students in making the transition to college, the college 
encourages new students to enroll in ASC 101 . In addition to the course content, enrolled 
students will receive special advising and other services. The course is described as 
follows: 

ASC 101 College: Strategies for Success (3-0-3) 

This course aims to provide the student with the skills, information, and guidance 
useful for success in college. It will focus on the purposes of higher education, the 
roles of the student, and the resources available within the college for academic 
success and career choices. 



Developmental Studies 

Faculty 

Geoffroy, Cynthia, Department Head 

Childress, Beth Jones Dianne 

Diaz, Donna Richardson, Edwin 

Harris, Karl Smith, Carolyn 

The Department of Developmental Studies provides a program of compensatory 
education for students whose academic deficiencies may prevent successful completion 
of collegiate studies. Students may be placed in departmental courses on the basis of the 
Collegiate Placement Examination or Regents Test performances. Regularly admitted 
students may in accordance with the policies of the Developmental Studies Program, 
enroll, subject to prerequisites, in any departmental courses. Conditionally admitted 
students must enroll in accordance with the stipulations of their admission (see the 
Conditional Admission section of this Catalog) and policies of the Developmental 
Studies program. (See next section.) 



DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 



235 



I tote entitled lo\ Henna Administration edw ttional benefit! n dried foe no 

n>re men 45 credit hours in dcp.irtnn-nt.il courses, U these COUTSt's are rtijuin 

^uler admission \t most 1 5 hours ma) beoertified Ineet hoi the English, mememem 1, 
fctd needing trees 

Policies of the Developmental Studies Program 

i \ ery time a Dei etopmentaJ Studies student registers or prere gi sters until exiting the 
1 V\ elopmentaJ Studies Program, He sin- must have his her i lass s^ hedule ipproved by 
1 Developmental Studies advisor or me DeveJopmentaJ Studies ( ounscinr 

rhe student is permitted tour attempts to exit a Developmental Studies area it a 
student nils to exit an area after the fourth attempt, he she will he nibjet t to 1 develop- 

mental Studies suspension 

\ complete list ot Developmental Studies Program Policies is available in the Depart- 
ment ot Developmental Studies 

OFFERINGS 

DSE 098 Grammar Review (5-0-5) 

lall. Winter Spring Summer. 

This course is tor the student who needs to review grammar fundamentals, to 
improve sentence Writing skills, and to develop paragraphs. The student works 
toward competence in sentence construction, verb use, determination of subject- 
verb agreement, formation of possessives, punctuation, and other basics. Along 
with reviewing grammar, the student engages in extensive writing practice, includ- 
ing sentence building, sentence combining, and paragraph writing 

DSE 099 Basic Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Policies above. 
Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is for the student who has already mastered the basic skills of compo- 
sition but who needs additional practice in developing the essay. It will help the 
student construct more mature and sophisticated sentence patterns, create coher- 
ent and well developed paragraphs, and organize paragraphs into essays. 

Introductory Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers a review of arithmetic integrated into an introductory algebra 

course. Topics include operations on signed numbers and simple polynomials, 

integer exponents, equations, word problems, factoring, some graphing, and 

simple radicals. 

Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Policies above. 

Topics include rational expressions, factoring, linear equations and inequalities, 
quadratic equations, word problems, graphs of linear functions, rational expo- 
nents, and radicals. 

Reading Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers a review of the basic reading skills needed by college students 
having difficulty with college level material. Areas to be covered include vocabu- 
lary development (word parts, context, denotation and connotation), main ideas, 
supporting details, organizational and rhetorical patterns, transitions, tone, pur- 
pose, fact and opinion, and inferential skills. 

Developing Reading Maturity (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is appropriate for students preparing for the Regents Examination, for 
students undergoing remediation due to unsuccessful performance on the reading 
portion of the Regents Examination, and for students experiencing moderate 
difficulty in reading. Comprehension skills, vocabulary enrichment, test-taking 
strategies, and reading fluency are stressed. 



236 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Military Science 

Faculty 

Scott, Daniel, Major, Department Head 

Johnson, Joseph, Captain Butler, Curtis, Master Sergeant 

Phillips, Anthony, Captain Batalona, Wesley, Sergeant First Class 

The Army Department of Military Science is a Senior Division Reserve Officer 
Training Corps (ROTO, Instructor Group, staffed by active Army personnel. The 
department provides a curriculum available to Armstrong State and Savannah State 
students that qualifies the college graduate for a commission as an officer in the United 
States Army, United States Army Reserve, or the United States National Guard. Quali- 
fying for a commission adds an extra dimension to the student's employment capability 
in that, upon graduation from the college, the student has either military or civilian 
employment options. Enrollment in Military Science classes is open to all students. 

The course of study offered in military science is designed not only to prepare both the 
student for service as a commissioned officer in the United States Army but also to 
provide knowledge and practical experience in leadership and management that will be 
useful in any facet of society. Male and female students are eligible for enrollment. Each 
student is provided with a working knowledge of the organization and functioning of the 
Department of Defense and the role of the U.S. Army in national security and world 
affairs. 

The course of study pursued by students during their freshman and sophomore years 
is the basic military science course and /or related skill activities. The course of study 
normally pursued by students during their junior and senior years is the advanced 
military science course. 

For selection and retention in the advanced course, a student must be physically 
qualified, should have maintained above average military and academic standing, and 
must demonstrate a potential for further leadership development. 

Graduates of the advanced course are commissioned second lieutenants in the United 
States Army, United States Army Reserve, or the United States National Guard in the 
branch of service most appropriate to their interests and academic achievements, 
consistent with the needs of the Army. Regardless of the Branch selected, all officers will 
receive valuable experience in management, logistics and administration. Graduates 
may be granted a delay in reporting for duty for graduate study, if requested. A small 
number of outstanding students are designated Distinguished Military Graduates and 
are offered commissions in the Regular Army each year. 

Basic Military Science 

Basic military science courses involve six quarters during the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The student learns leadership and management and acquires essential 
background knowledge of customs and traditions, weapons, map reading, tactics and 
survival. Equally important, these courses have the objective of developing the student's 
self-discipline, integrity and sense of responsibility. 

Advanced Military Science 

The general objective of this course of instruction is to produce junior officers who by 
education, training, attitude and inherent qualities are suitable for continued develop- 
ment as officers in the Army. There are two avenues available for the student to be eligible 
for entry into the advanced program and obtain a commission as a second lieutenant, 
(a) satisfactory completion of, or placement credit for, the basic program at Armstrong 
State or at any other school, college or university offering basic ROTC and meeting the 
entrance and retention requirements established by the Army. 






MILITARY SCIENCE 237 



(b)to be -in active duty veteran 01 junior ROIt cadet graduate eligible foi pUcemenl 
v redil 

Placement 

\ eterana entering the military m lence programs will receive app r opriate placement 
credit tor their active military service Students who have completed military sdi 
courses In militar) preparatorj schools or junior colleges ma) be given appropriate 
credit Students with at least three years of high school ROTi may also be granted 
placement credit. Placement credit or six Quarters of bask military science, or the 
equivalent thereof, is a prerequisite to admission Into the advanced p r ogr a m 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students with two years of coursework remaining, but who have not completed bask 
military science, are eligible to be considered tor selection into the advanced military 
science program. Those selected under the provisions of the two-year advanced program 
must satisfactorily complete a basic summer camp of six weeks duration prior to entering 

the advanced program. Students attending the basic camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, are 
paid at active army rates and given a travel allowance from their home to camp and 
return Attendance at Basic Camp is voluntary and incurs no military obligation until the 
student returns and decides to sign a contract to pursue a commission. 

Participating Students and Aliens 

1 Participating students are students who participate in Military Science courses but are 
not hilly enrolled or are ineligible for enrollment in the ROTC programs. Participating 
and alien students may enroll in the Military Science classes provided they meet the 
requirements outlined in Army Regulations and are approved by the Department Head 
and /or school authorities. Although these students may enroll in military science classes, 
they may only participate in classroom instructions. They will not participate in any high 
risk training, drill, marching, leadership laboratories, field training exercises, voluntary 
programs, or attend basic or advanced camp. These students will also not be issued or 
wear the uniform, nor receive credit toward commissioning or enlisted grade status 
through completion of ROTC courses. 

Advanced Summer Camp 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced courses are required to attend advanced 
summer camp, normally between their junior and senior academic years at Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

Financial Assistance 

All contracted advanced course cadets are paid a subsistence allowance of $100 per 
month while enrolled in the advanced course. 

Scholarship Program 

Each year the U.S. Army awards two- and three-year scholarships to outstanding 
young men and women participating in the Army ROTC program who desire careers as 
Army officers. The Army pays tuition, fees, books and laboratory expenses incurred by 
the scholarship student. In addition, each student receives $100 per month for the 
academic year. Individuals desiring to compete for these scholarships should apply to the 
Military Science Department. 



238 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplies 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC program will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, 
books and supplies by the Military Science Department. No fees or deposits of any kind 
will be required. Uniforms must be returned before commissioning or upon disenrollment 
from the ROTC program. 

MIL Courses 

The basic course of six quarters duration consists of two hours of instruction work per 
week. Students acquire knowledge of military leadership, weapons, tactics, basic mili- 
tary skills, and physical fitness. In field training exercises, potential for leadership is 
progressively developed. Basic course students are invited and encouraged to attend 
military science leadership laboratories and physical training sessions. 

The advanced course consists of three hours of classroom work and one hour of 
leadership laboratory per week. During the spring quarter prior to advanced camp the 
student will enroll in MIL 323 to prepare for attendance at Advanced Camp. HIS 357 
(American Military History) is normally taken spring quarter of the senior year. The 
coursework during the advanced course emphasizes techniques and management and 
leadership and the fundamentals and dynamics of the military team. Field training 
exercises provide the student with applied leadership experiences. Participation in 
leadership laboratories and physical training sessions are mandatory. 

Professional Military Education (PME) Requirements 

The Army's Professional Military Education requirements are established to provide 
cadets with the training and enrichment necessary to successfully compete in the Army. 
In addition to completing a baccalaureate degree, the cadet must complete one under- 
graduate course from each of the five designed fields of study (Some of these requirements 
may be waived for nursing majors). The five PME designated fields of study are listed 
below and the courses that meet the Cadet Command PME requirement: 

A. Written Communications Skills: ENG 101, ENG 102, and ENG 192. 

B. Human Behavior: PSY 101, SOC 201, HIS 114, HIS 115, and ANT 201. 

C. Math Reasoning: MAT 101 and MAT 103. 

D. Military History: HIS 357. 

E. Computer Literacy: CS 115, CS 120, CS 142, and CS 296. 

Minor Concentration 

The department offers a minor in Military Science. The program is designed to prepare 
the student for a commission in the United States Army and is offered to, but not required 
of, those students participating in the advanced course of Army ROTC instruction. 
Whatever the major, a Military Science minor will strengthen the student's management, 
leadership, and interpersonal communication skills. The minor requires: 

Twenty credit hours with grades of "C" or better in anv of the following upper division 
military science courses: 321, 322, 323, 421, 422, 423, and HIS 357. 

OFFERINGS 

MIL 121 Introduction to Mountaineering (1-2-2) 

Prerequisite: Enrollment is restricted to ROTC-eligible freshmen (and sophomores 
who are compressing MSI and MSII level courses) who desire to pursue to 
commission in the U.S. Army. 

Instruction and practical exercises introducing the fundamentals of mountaineer- 
ing (climbing, rappelling, belaying, and rope-bridging techniques). Emphasis is 
placed on knot-tying, safety procedures, and the use of group dynamics to expand 
the learning experience in a wilderness environment. One weekend field trip is 
required. Acceptable as a P.E. requirement. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



Mil 122 Introduction to tin- Knnj <" I - 1 ' 

Instruction pros 'iJfs.i Kisu understanding to the 1 s \rm\ and its role in na I 
defense l*he course includes a stud) of the \im\ R< > I c organization and braru hei 
i>t the i s \nn\ map reading customs and traditions "t the service, military 
writing physical titm-ss leadership drill ami ceremonies i ondw t and Lnspei Hon, 
role oi the \nm National Guard and Ann. and the role of ti . 

commissioned off icei rhis course includes a mandator) leadership laboratory f"r 
students pursuing a commission 

Mil 123 Bask Military I eaderahip (2-1 2) 

Instruction coven tin- fundamentals of Ann) leadership and nanagemenl tech 
niques rhis is a< complished through lectures and discussions on leadership and 
mana g e m ent theories, spec ial readings, and student presentations ( Hie weekend 
Held training exen ise< f I \>and attendance al leadership labor a tory are mandatory 
tor students pursuing a commission 

Mil ::i Land Navigation/Map Reading (2-1-2) 

rhis course consists of a stud) of I and Navigation to include map reading and 
orientation, including pra< ticaJ land navigation exen ises Attendant ea1 leadership 
laboratory is encouraged tor students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 222 Individual Military Skills (2-1-2) 

This course consists of tin- study of and practical application of bask military skills 
to include bask first aid, survival, and individual tactical skills Attendance al 
leadership laboratory is encouraged tor students pursuing a commission 

MIL 223 Basic Tactics (2-1-2) 

This course consists ot a study ot basic organization, tactics, and operational 
procedures executed at the (Light Infantry) platoon level This course includes a 
mandatory leadership laboratory tor students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 321 Advanced Tactics I (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites; Completion ot the Basic C Otirse or equivalent and approval of the 
Department \ lead 

Instruction and practical exercises on the fundamentals ot leadership and leaders 
role in directing individuals and small units m offensive and defensive tactics 
Emphasis is placed on developing and executing orders under a given scenario, and 
troop leading procedures. Land navigation and communication subjects are in- 
cluded in the course. This course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory and 
attendance at physical training sessions. 

MIL 322 Advanced Tactics II (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites; Completion ot the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head 

Instruction and practical exercises on the fundamentals of leadership and the 
leader's role in directing small and large units in offensive and defensive tactics 
Emphasis is placed on squad tactical reaction, patrolling techniques, and conduct- 
ing after-action reviews, rhis course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory 
and attendance at physical training sessions. 
MIL 323 Advanced Military Leadership (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head 

Instruction and practical exercises on management, leadership, and motivation 
techniques which relate to both civilian and military environments. Emphasis is 
placed on Green lab leadership and leadership assessment. Course includes sub- 
jects deemed necessar) as final preparation tor advanced summer training. This 
course includes a mandators leadership laboratory and attendance at physical 
training sessions. 



240 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MIL 325 Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 

Summer. 

Prerequisites: MIL 323 and approval of the Department Head. 
The study and practical application of military skills and leadership ability during 
a six-week encampment experience. Grading for this course will be done on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Instruction and evaluation is jointly accom- 
plished by Department staff and selected ROTC personnel assigned to 1st Region. 

MIL 421 Command and Staff Operations (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department head. 

This course provides the MS IV cadet with instruction in the Army Command and 

staff functions. Military and professional knowledge topics include: write in the 

Army style, write an After Action Report, oral communications, conduct briefings, 

prepare to and conduct training, evaluate training, and the Leadership Assessment 

Program. Attendance at leadership laboratory and physical training sessions is 

mandatory. 

MIL 422 Leadership and Management (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department Head. 
This course consists of study of military law, the law of war and basic professional 
knowledge an individual needs in order to be a professional officer. Attendance at 
Leadership Laboratory and physical training sessions is mandatory. 

MIL 423 Transition to an Army Lieutenant (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department Head. 
This course prepares and assists MS IV cadets in their transition from cadet/student 
to commissioned officer/professional. Attendance at leadership laboratory and 
physical training sessions is mandatory. 

Naval ROTC Program 

Faculty 

Cdr. Claven Williams, USN, Department Head 

Cdr. Gordon C. Lannou, Jr., USN LT Howard Peyton, Jr., USN 

MAJ. Edwin Fielder, USMC LT Thelonious U. Vaults, USNR 

LT Alfredo Arredondo, USN LT Scott A. Maddock, USNR 

General 

Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) prepares students for commissioned 
service as regular or reserve officers in the Navy or Marine Corps. 

Students enrolled in NROTC are referred to as Midshipmen (MIDN) or as Naval 
Science Students (NSS) and are classified based on Naval Science academic status as 
follows: 

ASC Student NROTC Midshipmen 

Senior 1 /C (First Class) 

Junior 2/C (Second Class) 

Sophomore 3/C (Third Class) 

Freshman 4/C (Fourth Class) 

Naval Science Curriculum 

Basic Program 

ALL MIDSHIPMEN 

Hours 

A. Naval Science 24 

NSC 101, 102, 103 9 

NSC 210, 202, 203 15 



NAVAL ROTC PROGRAM 241 



h tdvaiv ed Program Nav) i tption 
Naval Si lencc 
NS( 101 KX2 

NS( 101 KH i< ,; 
( Advanced Program Marine < orps Option 

\.»\ al s * lent e 14 

N9 

NSC * ; I 

P Additional and Substitute Requirements 

NSC -i^ 1 Naval Drill (0 2 0), required each scademU term by .ill midshipmen \s( 

103, 109 and 450 satisfies 6 hours oi physical education requirements 
I Navy Scholarship Midshipmen 

(1) Requirements 

Math 206-207 206 (to be completed b\ end oi Sophomore Year) 15 

Physics 217 218-219 (to be completed by the end ot [unior Year) 18 

Computer Science l 56 or 142 or 24^ or 120 

Must complete 2 quarters from the following list of courses: 10 

HIS 357 and PSC201 (SSC) 

Must complete one academic term in a major Indo-European or Asian Language 

prior to commissioning 5 

(2) Navy Option in a non-technical curricula shall complete a sufficient number 

ot technical electees from the below list to comprise 50 percent of all electives not 

required by the academic major or NROTC Program. Calculus and Physics 

Courses count towards satisfying this requirement: 

Business (SSC): BAD 331, 332, 416 

Chemistry: any listed course 

Math, Physics, Physical Science: any listed courses except 

Math 290', 391, and 393. 

Computer Science: CS 120, 136, 142, 246 

Engineering Courses: Any listed course 

except EGR 100, 170, 171 

Navy College Program Midshipmen (nonscholarship) 

Must complete 1 year of Math, college algebra or higher, by the end of the Junior Year 
and 1 year Physical Science by the end of the Senior Year as a requisite for commissioning. 
The Physical Science requirement can be met by completing a one-year sequence, or two 
courses, in any area of physical science. One Mathematics course may be selected from 
the fields of computer science or statistics. 

Marine Corps Option 

All students shall take, during the Junior or Senior year, HIS 201 and PSC 201 (SSC). 
(Courses must be approved by the Marine Corps Officer Instructor and should not create 
an academic overload (increase time required for degree completion/commissioning 
and/or require student to carry more than 18 hours). 

NROTC Uniforms, Books, and Instructional Materials 

Will be issued at no cost to Naval Science students. Uniforms must be returned before 
commissioning or upon disenrollment from the NROTC Program; books and other 
instructional materials must be returned at the end of each academic term. 

Scholarship Program 

Two and three-and-a-half year scholarships that pay tuition, fees, books and labora- 
tory expenses, in addition, scholarship midshipmen also receive a $1 00 per month tax free 
stipend during the academic year. 



242 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Financial Assistance 

All midshipmen in the advanced NROTC Program (Junior and Senior Years) are paid 
a $100 per month tax free subsistence allowance (same as $100 per month stipend for 
scholarship midshipmen). 

Summer Training Cruises 

All scholarship midshipmen will go on Summer Training Cruises each year. While on 
summer training, midshipmen will be paid active duty Navy rates and will be provided 
travel, room and board at government expense. 

4 and 2- Year NROTC Programs 

4-year program students enroll in the program as Freshmen and participate until 
graduation. 

2-year program students enter the program after they complete approximately 90 
hours (end of Sophomore year) and complete a six-week professional, academic, and 
physical training program conducted each summer by the Navy, normally in Newport, 
RI and referred to as Naval Science Institute (NSI). Academic work at the Naval Science 
Institute is the equivalent of the NROTC basic course and 1 8 hours of credit will be given 
to students who successfully complete NSI. 

Naval Science Offerings 

NSC 101 Introduction to Naval Science (2-1 -3) 

Introduce midshipmen to NROTC Program mission, organization, regulations, 
and broad warfare components of the naval service. Included is an overview of 
officer and enlisted rank and rating structure, training and education, promotion 
and advancement, and retirement policies. The course also covers naval courtesy 
and customs, a study of the organization of the naval service, career opportunities, 
and the duties of a Junior Officer in the naval service. Students are familiarized with 
the major challenges facing today's naval officer, especially in the areas of leader- 
ship and human resources management. Fall, Winter. 

NSC 102 Seapower and Maritime Affairs (5-0-5) 

A survey of American Naval and Maritime history from the American Revolution 
to the present with emphasis on major developments. Attention will be focused on 
Mahan's geopolitical theory; economic and maritime forces; U.S. military and 
maritime strategy; and a comparative analysis of American and Soviet maritime 
strategies. Winter. 

NSC 103 Basic Sailing I (Classroom) (1-1 -1 ) 

A basic foundation course that provides students with the fundamental knowledge 
and skills to be a competent crew member. The course covers the basic theory of 
sailing, nomenclature, seamanship, boat equipment and safety, and inland waters 
navigation rules for sailing craft. An "A" crew qualification will be issued upon 
completion. Prerequisite: Student must be a certified third class swimmers. Fall, 
Spring. (PE Credit) 

NSC 201/202 Navigation I & II (3-2-5) 

An in-depth study of piloting and celestial navigation theory, principles, and 
procedures. Students learn piloting navigation: the use of charts, visual and 
electronic aids, and the theory and operation of magnetic gyro compasses. Celestial 
navigation is covered in-depth including the celestial coordinate system, an intro- 
duction to spherical trigonometry, the theory and operation of the sextant, and a 
step-by-step treatment of the sight reduction process. Students develop practical 
skills in both piloting and celestial navigation. Other topics discussed include tides, 
currents, effects of wind and weather, plotting, use of navigation instruments, types 
and characteristics of electronic navigation systems. Fall, Winter sequences. 



NAVAL ROTC PROGRAM 243 



\sc 103 Leadership and MaiiAgtmtnt I (5-0 I) 

\ i omprehensh c ~-itui\ oJ the prim Iples tnd concepts ol Institutional nu 
nu-nt organisational tnd human betuh lot tnd effective leadership Studei • 
develop tdditiont I knowledge tnd practical skills In tl I commun 

theor) tnd practices; Human Kesnun i*s Management Street Management; I oun 
weling; Grwp Dynamics; tnd the nature and dynamics of individual tnd institutional 
change humtn resistance to change tnd 1 1 1 » • strategy t"r Implementing i • 
Spring (BAD 162 Organizational tneor) tnd Behtvioi o ff ered tl the school ol 
Business > ss <- I will substitute tor this course 

\sc 30] Naval ships Systems i <i ngineering) (5-0-5) 

\ detailed study of ship < harac t eri sti cs tnd types Im luding ship design hydrody 
namk forces stability, compartmentatioiv propulsion, electrical tnd tuxiliary 
systems, interior communications, ship control, tnd damage control BasJ 
cepts of the theory tnd design ol steam K i,s turbine, tnd nuclear propulsion. 
shipboard safety tnd Rrefighting are also covered Spring 

NSC 302 Naval Operations (5-0-5) 

A Stud) ol the mternation.il tnd inland rules ot tin- nautical road, relative motion 

vector-anal) sis theory, relative motion problems, torm.it ion tactics, tnd ship em- 
ployment Also included is an Introduction to Naval Operations and aspects ot ship 

handling and afloat naval communication. P rerequisites; NSC 201- 202. Winter 

NSC 303 Intermediate Sailing (On-water) (1-3-2) 

Basic hands-on sail training leading to qualification as "B" skipper qualification 

Practical skills to be mastered consist ot rigging and sailing from a pier sail DO 
weather; sail two figure eight courses with two tacks and two jibes; man overboard 
maneuver; a capsize; and return to dock and secure. Prerequisites: NSC 103. Spring 
(PE credit) 

NSC 304/305 Evolution of Warfare I & II (3-0-3) 

This course historically traces the development of warfare from the dawn of 
recorded historv to the present, focusing on the impact of major military theorists, 
strategists, tacticians, and technological developments. Students acquire a basic 
sense of strategy, develop an understanding of military alternatives, and become 
aware of the impact of historical precedent on military thought and actions. Fall, 
Winter 

NSC 306 Marine Corps Laboratory (0-3-0) 

A course for Marine Corps Option students which stresses the development of 
leadership, moral, and physical qualifications necessary for service as Marine 
Corps officers. Practical laboratory exercises in mission and organization of the 
Marine Corps, duties of interior guards, introduction to military tactics, troop 
leadership procedures, rifle squad weapons and theorv of physical conditioning 
program. This course serves to prepare students for the Marine Corps Summer 
Training at Officer Candidate School (BULLDOG). Spring 

NSC 401 Naval Ships Systems II (Weapons) (5-0-5) 

This course outlines the theory and employment of weapons systems. Students 
explore the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selection, 
delivery, guidance, and naval ordinance. Fire control systems and major weapons 
types are discussed. The concepts of command-control-and- communications are 
explored as a means of weapons systems integration. Winter. 

NSC 402 Naval Operations Laboratory (0-1-0) 

Practical laboratory exercises conducted in a dynamic, composite and time oriented 
fleet environment to further develop and improve surface warfare skills for Navy 
Option midshipmen. Winter. 



244 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NSC 403 Leadership and Management II (3-0-3) 

A study of the Management responsibilities of a junior Naval Officer. The course 
covers counseling methods, military justice administration, Naval human re- 
sources management, directives and correspondence, naval personnel, 
administration, material management and maintenance, and supply systems. This 
course builds on and integrates the professional competencies developed in prior 
course work and professional training. This course prepares final quarter midship- 
men for the personal and professional responsibilities of a Junior Officer reporting 
aboard and relieving. Prerequisite: NSC 203. Spring. 

NSC 404/405 Amphibious Warfare I & II (3-0-3) 

A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine and the conduct of 
amphibious operations. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of amphibious war- 
fare in the 20th century, especially during World War II. Present day potential and 
limitations on amphibious operations, including the rapid deployment force con- 
cept. Fall, Winter. 

NSC 450 Naval Drill (0-2-0) 

Introduces students to basic military formations, movements, commands, courte- 
sies and honors, and provides practice in Unit leadership and management. 
Physical conditioning and training are provided to ensure students meet Navy/ 
Marine Corps physical fitness standards. Successful completion of three quarters of 
this course by NROTC students satisfies the College's six hour Physical Education 
requirement. NSC 450 is required each quarter for all NROTC students (450.1 for 
Freshman and Sophomores; 450.2 for Junior and Seniors). 




246 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY ROSTERS 



Permanent, Full-Time Members of the Teaching Corps or 
Administrative Staff 

(This list includes only individuals who have faculty voting privileges. The number 
in parentheses after the names represents the initial year of employment at Armstrong 
State College.) 



Abercrombie, Susan (1990) 

Head of Public Services 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.Ln., Emory University 
B.A., California State University 

• Adams, Joseph V. (1970) 

Dean of Arts and Sciences 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Alabama 

M.A., Baylor University 

B.A., Tennessee Temple College 

Aenchbacher, Louis E., Ill (1980) 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

h Agyekum, Stephen K. (1979) 

Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 

'Anderson, James N. (1985) 
Head of Art & Music Department 
Professor of Music 
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 
M.M., University of Houston 
B.M.E., Wichita State University 

Andrews, Carol M. (1988) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Furman University 

Arens, Olavi (1974) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
M.A., Columbia University 
A.B., Harvard University 

August, Robert H. (1992) 

Director, Computer and Information 

Services 
Instructor of Computer Science 

M.B.A., Regis College 

M.A., Central Michigan University 

B.S., University of Maryland 

Baker, Julia G. (1987) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Furman University 



Ball, Ardella P. (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
Sc.D., Nova University 
M.S., Atlanta University 
A.B., Fisk University 

* Barnard, Jane T. (1980) 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

Ed.S. Georgia Southern College 
M.S., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

*Battiste, Bettye A. (1980) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., State University of New York 
B.S., Savannah State College 

*Beumer, Ronald J. (1975) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Arkansas 
B.S., University of Dayton 

Bjorn, Edith (1990) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ph.D., State University of New York 
M.S., State University of New York 
M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College 
B.S., East Stroudsburg State College 

Bowers, Ross L., Ill (1979) 

Head of Respiratory Therapy Department 
Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 

MHS, Armstrong State College 

B.S., Georgia State University 

Bowles, Kenneth E. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
D.M.A., University of Oklahoma 
M.M.E., University of Oklahoma 
B.M.E., Texas Christian University 

Brewer, John G. (1968) 
Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 

M.S., University of Georgia 

B.S., University of Georgia 

Brower, Moonyean S. (1967) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
M.A., University of Massachusetts 
B.S., University of Massachusetts 

Brown, George E. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 
M.S.S.W., Atlanta University 
B.S.W., Armstrong State College 
A.B., Armstrong State College 



FACULTY 



247 



'Brawn Husk R I i"" sl 

. llsh 

Ph D l niversit) ol South ^ arolina 
\i \ I s, Michael ^ oll< 

B s \.u i,t i>t «. )hio 

HruvMV Sjr.ih | I 

Assistant Professor of llistor\ and HiatOli< 
h r c— 1 1 .Kn>n 

M.Phil George Washington ( niversit) 
\i \ George Washington Universit) 
B \ Arkansas ( ollegc 

Hiuk [osepti \ IN (1968) 

\ ice President tor Student Affairs 

Id n l ni\ ersit) ol <. leorgia 

\1 S Florida State University 

B \ Auburn l niversit) 

Buck, Marilyn \1. (1974) 

Head ot Baccalaureate Nursing Department 

Professor oi Nursing 
Ed P Universit) of South c arolina 
\i S N Medical College oi Georgia 
SSJN Boston I niversit) 

■uraast, Clifford v. (1979) 
Professor of Education 

Ld.D., Auburn University 

( leorge Peabody 
A B Mercer University 

Burnett, Robert A. (1978) 

President 

IVotossor oi History 
Ph.D.. L niversity oi North Carolina 
M.A., University oi North Carolina 
B. A.. Wot ford Coll* 

Butler, Frank A. (1985) 

Vice President and Dean of Faculty 

Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
B.S.E.S., University of Miami 

Bykat, Alexander (1992) 

Callaway P ro fes sor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University oi London 
M.Sc., University of London 
B.Sc., City of Leicester Polytechnic 

Byrd, James T. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.S.P.H., University oi North Carolina 
A.B., University oi North Carolina 

Caldwell, Eva (1987) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

MSN Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Armstrong State College 

Carpenter, Suzanne (1988) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

M.S., University of North Carolina 

B.S., Auburn University 

A. A., Lake-Sumter Junior College 



( henaull George S I 

Assist. ml Protest ition 

I'M I > I ni\ ersit) "t Iowa 

ltl> C .Hull! 

B S South ( arolina Stan 

c bildreat, lath (1990) 

Assistant Protcssor of Reading 
m \ New "i ork i niversit) 
M \ I emple i niversity 

c lancy, Prank M (19 
Assistant Professor oi 1 nguah 

M \ . \ iii.mo\ .1 i niversity 
M S Vill.uun a L niversity 

c lark, Sandra H. (19901 

Assistant Professor ot Nursing 

\h\ Medical <. ollegc i 
B s N Armstrong State t oik 

C nmaskey, Bernard j. (1* 

Assistant Professor of History 

M \ . New > ork l niversit) 

HA. lordham C ollegC 

Connor, Sara E. (1980) 
Assistant to the Dean 

\sso< iate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D . Universit) oi Geoi 
M.S.N , Medical College oi Georgia 

B.S.N . Medical Coll rgia 

Conway, Marian (1987) 
Assistant Professor oi Nursing 
M 5 N . Medical College of Georgia 

B.S.N.. Georgia College 

Cooksey, Thomas L. (1987) 
Associate Professor of English and 
Philosophy 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
MA, California Polytechnic State 

University 
B.A., University ot California 

k Cosgrove, Maryellen S. (1989) 

Associate Professor oi Education 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
MA., University of Connecticut 
B.S., University oi Connecticut 

Cottrell, Isabel D. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Florida State university 
MA , University of Texas at Arlington 
B.A., University of Texas at Austin 

Counsil, Roger L. (1991) 

Head of the Division oi Physical Education 

and Athletics and Athletic Director 

Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., Southern Illinois Univera 
B.S., Southern Illinois University 



248 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Coursey, Teresa (1971) 

\ssistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., West Liberty State College 

Cross, Deanna S. (1989) 

\\i\m.\ of Associate Degree Nursing 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., Boston College 

M.S.N. , Boston College 

B.S.N., University of Akron 

Daassa, Dall (1990) 

Assistant Professor of French 
M.A.(2), University of Avignon 
B.A., University of Avignon 
B.A., University of Bourgogne 

♦Dandy, Evelyn B. (1974) 

Professor of Education 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., Temple University 
B.S., Millersville State College 

Diaz, Donna P. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi 
B.S., Mississippi College 

Douglass, W. Keith (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 
M.A., Syracuse University 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

Dubus, Judy (1990) 

Reference/ Bibliographic Instruction 

Librarian 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.S., Florida State University 

A.B., University of Georgia 

♦Duncan, John D. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Emory University 

M.A., University of South Carolina 

B.S., College of Charleston 

Dutko, Kathleen (1978) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.A., New York University 

B.S.N., Niagara University 

♦Ealy, Steven D. (1982) 
Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Claremont Graduate School 
B.A., Furman University 

Edenfleld, Suzanne (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Findels, John (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.S., University of Illinois 
B.S., University of Illinois 



Ford, Elizabeth J. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 

B.S., Winthrop College 

Frazier, Douglas R. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of Washington 
B.A., Western Washington State College 

♦Galloway, Herbert F. (1982) 
Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
M.M., Florida State University 
B.M., Florida State University 

Gehrm II, John A. 

Executive Director, Office of College 
Advancement 

M.Ed. Salisbury State University 

B.S. Salisbury State University 

Geoffroy, Cynthia D. (1978) 

Head of Developmental Studies Department 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of South Carolina 

B.A., Westfield State College 

Gibson, Sharyn (1983) 

Head of Radiologic Technologies 

Department 

Assistant Professor of Radiologic 

Technologies 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., St. Joseph's College 

A. A., Armstrong State College 

Green, Rachel (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Georgia 
B.F.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

♦Gross, Jimmie (1967) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.D., Southern Theological 
B.A., Baylor University 

Guillou, Laurent J., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Louisiana State University 

♦Hansen, John R. (1967) 

Professor of Mathematics 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Troy State College 

Hardegree, Lester E., Jr. (1982) 
Director of Medical Technology Program 
Assistant Professor of Medical Technology 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



FACULTY 



H.wns ll,ni\ I i 1946) 

i load ><t ( hiinis(i\ sr^ Physics Department 

ProtesNOl ol l henmtl \ 

Ph I i Institute ol I ri Knol 

H S Institute ol I e< hnolog) 

Harris. Karl D 11*71) 

Assistant Professor ot Fnglish 
\1 \ I ni\ ersit) ol 1 ennessee 
i> \ t. .iis v >n \i-w man <■ ollege 

n.ur.s Robert i U9tU 

\ssiH Kiti- Protessoi ot \1usii 

p \i \ I mwtsit\ of Washington 
\i \i I niversit) ol tin- Ra< itu 
B M i nh i-isit\ oi the Pa< itu 

Hart. MarcelU (1986) 
Assistant rrofestoi oi Nursing 

M.\ . I niversit] ol Washington 

BSU m |ohn College 

•Harwood, Pamela L. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Bd D Auburn L niversih 

\1 A Appalachian State I niversity 
B s -\ppaLu hian State University 

•Hizer, Todd). (1989) 
Assistant Professor ot Chemistry 

Ph.D I ni\ crsitN ot South C arolina 
B.S., Old Dominion I niversity 

Hobe, John J. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University ot San Francisco 
M.A., California state University 
B.S.Ed., Bowling Green State University 

Hollinger, Karen (1990) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 
M.A., Loyola University 
B.A., Loyola University 

Hollis, Selwyn L. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Hopkinson, Caroline (1989) 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin- 
Milwaukee 

B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison 

•Hudson, Anne L. (1971) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Tulane Universitv 

M.S., Tulane University 

B.A., Hollins College 

Hudson, Sigmund (1985) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 

Science 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

M.S., Clarkson University 

A.B., Dartmouth College 



I.UIWS \1,, h.,,-1 I I I 

Assistant l'r<>t.-N-,..r <>t Ph\ si. s 

M S i nh srsity ..i North l arolina 

B \ \pp.ii.i. in. in Stats i nivt 

l.nkms MatVtSI \ (14hH) 
Assistant Protessoi i>t I nghsh 

M \ i nh ersit) ol 

M s . I nivtrsit) ,.f ( ieorgM 

|i-nsen. |ohn (. (lffg) 
Assm late Protessoi < >t Art 

\i i \ i niversirt ol Arizona 

B s Unh ersit) ( >t \\ is. onsin 

•|i-nsi-n. I inda (. ll^HS) 

Associate Professor ol Art 
m i \ Memphis State I Diversity 
\i a i Memphis State 1 niversity 

B A 1 . I niversit) of Mississippi 

Jodis, Stephen (1990) 

Assistant Professor of ( omputer Science 

M.S., Auburn University 
B.C.P.F , Auburn University 

Jones, Dianne (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., William Carey College 
B.S., Mississippi State University 

Kearnes, John (1988) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Ph.D., University of Utah 

M.A., Andrews University 

B.A., Union College 

Keith, William C, Jr. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

MM., University of North Carolina 
B.M., East Carolina University 

Keller, Carola (1970) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., University of Virginia 

Kempke, Suzanne (1992) 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

M.S., University of Illinois 

M.A., Northwestern University 

A.B., University of Illinois 

B.S., University of Illinois 

Kennedy, Robert (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.S. PH., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Appalachian State University 

♦Kilhefner, Dale Z. (1973) 
Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Purdue University 
M.Ed., Washington State University 
B.S., Elizabethtown College 



250 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Knorr, Virginia W. (1973) 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.S., University of Tennessee 

(Knoxville) 
B.S., University of Tennessee 
(Chattanooga) 

Kolodny, Robert A. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Queens College of New York 

Koth, Andreas W. (1991) 

Instructor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

*Lane, Joseph M., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lanier, Osmos, Jr. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.A., LaGrange College 

Lariscy, Michael L. (1976) 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Coordinator of Physical Education Programs 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Larson, Brett A. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lee, Byung Moo (1981) 

Director of Library Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.L.S., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., Yon Sei University 

Levett, Nettle M. (1975) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Florida A & M University 

*Martin, Grace B. (1980) 
Head of Division of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences 

Director of General Studies Program 
Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Armstrong State College 

Martin, Keith W. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Engineering Studies 
Ph.D., Clemson University 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



Martin, William B. (1980) 
Assistant Professor of English 

M.A., Duke University 

B.A., Armstrong State College 

Massey, Carole M. (1976) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Matthews, Robert E. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
M.S., Iowa State University 
B.A., Simpson College 

McMillan, Tim (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.S., University of South Carolina 

McRae, Laurie (1992) 

Instructor of Radiation Therapy 

M.S., The University of North Florida 
B.S., University of Central Florida 

*Megathlin, William L. (1971) 

Dean of Academic and Enrollment Services 
Professor of Criminal Justice 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

Miller, Mary (1970) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Virginia 

Munson, Richard E. (1972) 
Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

Ph.D., Rutgers University 

M.S., Rutgers University 

B.A., Houghton College 

*Murphy, Dennis D. (1981) 

Professor of Criminal Justice 
J.D., University of Florida 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
B.A., University of Florida 

Neuman, Bonnie (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Wayne State University 
B.S.N. , University of Michigan 

♦Newberry, S. Lloyd (1968) 

Head, Division of Education 
Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 



FACULTY 



251 



Noble, David <i^> 
rrofsssoi ol <> iennan ind l atin 
Ph D McGUl i niversit) 

\ \1 Boston I im riMl\ 

\ B Bo st on I m\ ersit) 
Diploma I Itterarium i atinarunv 

Pontifida I niversitas Gregoriana 

Nordquist. Richard \ (19t0) 

Associate Professor ot 1 nglish 

Ph D i m\ ersit) oi ( leorgia 
M \ i m\ ersit) ol I ek ester 
B \ State Universit) of New York 

No te wo rth y, Gar) (1900) 

ivan. Coastal Georgia i. enter 
Ph D . PlorkU State Universit) 
M \ Florida State Univerait) 
B \ Florida State I ni\ ersit) 

•Palefsky, Elliot H. (1971) 
Professor ol Prychologi 
Ed.D., Univerait) ol South Carolina 

Ed.S., Georgia Southern College 

Ed M remple l niversity 
B.S., University ol Georgia 

•Palmiotto, Michael ]. (1987) 
Professof ot Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University oi Pittsburgh 
MP. A., City University of New York 
B.S., Mercy College 

Paton, Jennie C. (1989) 

Instructor of Library Science 

M IS, University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

Patterson, Robert L. (1966) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
MA., University of Kentucky 
B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan 

Phillips, Anthony B. (CAPT.) (1992) 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B.S., Albany State College 

Popieniek, Paul H. (1992) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 
Sc.B., Brown University 

Powell, Catharine L. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.S.N., DePauw University 

Pruden, Rhel B. (1985) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.N., University of South Carolina 
B.S.N., SUNY- Buffalo 

*Pruden, George B., Jr., (1982) 
Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., American University 
M.A., American University 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., Wake Forest 



K.iMnn.ui Richard 1 1 
i 1 nglish 
Ph I > Miami i nh ersit) 
m \ i m\ ersit) oi vs pooling 
B \ t ruversit) ol r\ yeaning 

Ki'ivi-j, Kenneth (19901 
i [end oi Biology I ^epartmeni 
Professor »>t Biology 

Ph D . I ulane I nh ersity 

\i S Florida State i niversit) 

B \ Florida State I niversity 

Reilly, Nancy 1 . (1990) 

Assot late Professor oi Nursing 
Ph D.,l niversity ol Mu higan 
M.S., I niversity oi Michigan 
B.S.N. , Georgetown University 

'Repella, James F. (1976) 

Dean oi Health Professiona 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., University oi Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University oi Pennsylvania 

B.S.Ed., Temple University 

>Rhee, Steve Y. (1974) 
Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
M.A., University of Oregon 
B.A., University of Oregon 

Richardson, Edwin G. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Maine 
B.A., University of South Florida 

Roberts, Lynn T. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Rodgers, Anne T. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Medical Technology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.A.T., University of Massachusetts 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University 

'Roesel, Rosalyn L. (1984) 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., North Texas State University 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Medical College oi Georgia 

*Roth, Lorle (1983) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., Kent State University 
M.A., Kent State University 
B.A., Kent State University 

Saadatmand, Yassaman (1989) 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
M.B.A., James Madison University 
B.S., National Iranian Oil Company 
College of Finance 

Schmidt, John C. (1979) 
Associate Professor of Art 

M.F.A., Ohio University 

B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 



252 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Schollaert, Warren L. (1990) 
Associate Professor of Education 
E.D.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Roosevelt University 
B.A., Arizona State University 

*Schultz, Lucinda D. (1986) 
Associate Professor of Music 

D.M.A., University of Coloradoo 
M.M., Colorado State University 
B.S., Dickinson State College 

Scott, Daniel B., Major (1991) 

Head of Military Science Department 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 
M.A., Central Michigan University 
B.S., South Carolina State College 

Shipley, Charles (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 

Science 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.A., University of Nebraska 
B.A., University of North Dakota 

Silcox, Elaine (1972) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

B.S.N., University of Florida 

*Simon, Emma T. (1974) 

Acting Associate Graduate Dean 

Professor of Health Science 

Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.H.E., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Sisson, Michelle W. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

Smith, Carolyn G. (1977) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, James (1990) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Berry College 

Smith, Pamela E. (1987) 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

M.Ed., Armstrong State College 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, William J., Jr. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical University of South 
Carolina 

Stegall, John L. (1981) 

Vice President for Business and Finance 
M.B.A, University of Georgia 
B.S., Indiana State University 



Stern, Camille P. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Texas 
M.S.N., University of Alabama 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

*Stokes, William W. (1967) 

Assistant Dean 
Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

B.A., University of Florida 

♦Stone, Janet D. (1975) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., Emory University 
M.A., Purdue University 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Women's College 

Stratton, Cedric (1965) 

Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of London 

Strauser, Edward B. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., State University of New York 
M.S., Canisius College 
B.S., State University of New York 

♦Streater, James, Jr. (1988) 
Associate Professor of Health Science 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

*Strozier, Robert I. (1965) 

Director of Public Relations 

Professor of English 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., Florida State University 
A.B., University of Georgia 

Taggart, Helen M. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N. , Georgia Southern University 
B.S.N. , Armstrong State College 

Talley, Brenda S. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.N., Armstrong State College 

*Tanenbaum, Barbara G. (1972) 

Head of Dental Hygiene Department 
Associate Professor of Dental Hygiene 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

Tapp, Lawrence M. (1959) 

Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee 
M.S., University of Tennessee 
B.S., University of Tennessee 

Taylor, Stephen A. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
B.A., Oswega State College 



FACULTY 



253 



l horns i ram is \i m 
Professoi ol Bi< 

PH I ) l tm ersit) ol 

B S Stetson l niversit) 

! Life) Rom lltW) 

\ssistanl Professor o( Bi< 
Ph D Bayloi < ollegc ol Medicine 
\1 S \ .»st rennessee State I niversity 
B5 i ast rennessee Stale I niversity 

•I.lson. \ Iwlfl K. (19 

m late Professoi ol Radiok 
I *•«. hnologies 
Ed D., i. ni\ ersit) oi c leorgia 
\1 S San Fraiu isco State I niversity 
B S Arizona Mate Unh ersity 

\ Ogelsang Kevin | I 

Associate Professoi ol Music 
P \l \ l niversit) ol ^ incinnatj 
\1 M l niversit) ol c incinnatj 
B M . I niversit) ot c incinnatj 

VNalkor Deborah |. (1992) 

Assistant Professor ol \nthropolog) 
Phil. Pennsylvania State University 
M \ Pennsylvania State I niversity 
B S Universit) ol Michigan 

Walworth, Margaret \ . (1991) 

Assistant Pro fe s so r of Education 
Ph.D.. University of Georgia 
M.Ed.. Qemson I ni\ a - 
B s Qemson L niversity 

•Warlick, Roger K. (1970) 
Head of History Department 
P ro fess or ot f listorv 

Ph.D., Boston University 

B.A., Arizona State University 

Weingarten, Barry E. (1991) 

Assistant Professor ot Spanish 
Ph.D., University ot Pennsylvania 
M A . University of Pennsylvania 
B.A., George Washington Universit) 

Welsh, John A., Ill (1967) 
Assistant Professor ot English 

M A., Vanderbilt University 

B.A., Davidson College 

*Wheeler, Ed R. (1987) 
Head of Mathematics and Computer Science 
Department 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

B.A., Samford University 

White, Laurie (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

Ph.D., University of Florida 

M.S., University of Florida 

B.A., University of Virginia 

White, Susan S. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Winthrop College 



'Whiten Morns I (I • 

I . 
Ph I » l ni\ «rsit\ . • 
B S i 

Williamson, |ana B 1 1 

Assistant Pi 

N Medi< al ( o 
M.Ed < ithem ( oik 

B S \ I !ll\ rfs||\ , ' 

v\\nn Gall (. (1992) 

Assist. mt Professor »>t Biol 
Ph I > . I ouisiana State I niversity 
\l s , i ouisiana State l niversit) 
B S . Oglethorpe University 

YentSCh, Anne (1492) 

Assoc iate Professor ol I listorical 
Art haeolo] 

Ph D , Brown I ni\ t-rsity 

\1 \ , Brown I niversity 

\1 \ . I niversity of Miami (Florida) 

Zipperer, William C. (1491) 
Assistant Professor oi ( henustry 
Ph D ., University of Georgia 
B.S., University ol Georgia 



Emeriti Faculty 

Anchors, Lorraine (1954-1983) 
Professor of English Emerita 

Ashmore, Henry L. (1965-1982) 
President Emeritus 

Beecher, Orson (1942-1982) 
Professor of History Emeritus 

Bell, Dorothy G. (1969-1991) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing Emerita 

Boney, Madeline (1967-1982) 
Profes so r of History Emerita 

Brooks, Sammy Kent (1966-1990) 
Professor of English Emeritus 

Coyle, William (1957-1987) 
Pro fe ssor of Political Science Emeritus 

Davenport, Leslie B., Jr. (1958-1983) 
Professor of Biology Emeritus 

Davis, Lamar W. 

sor of Business Administration 
Emeritus 

Gadsden, Ida (1956-1981) 
Professor of Education Emerita 

Harmond, Thelma (1963-1981) 
Professor of Education Emerita 

Killorin, Joseph I. (1947-1988) 
Professor of Philosophy & Literature 
Emeritus 

Lawson, Cornelia (1972-1987) 

Professor of Education Emerita 



254 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Magnus, Robert E. (1973-1991) 
Professor of Criminal Justice Emeritus 

McCarthy, John C. (1962-1990) 

Professor of Political Science Emeritus 

McClanahan, Billie F. (1981-1989) 

Assistant Professor of English Emerita 

Newman, John (1968-1987) 
Professor of Political Science Emeritus 

Pendexter, Hugh III (1965-1983) 
Professor of English Emeritus 

Robbins, Paul (1966-1986) 
Professor of Chemistry Emeritus 



Robinson, Aurella (1972-1986) 
Associate Professor of Education Emerita 

Sartor, Herman (1964-1981) 

Professor of Education Emeritus 

Sims, Roy Jesse (1955-1990) 

Professor of Physical Education Emeritus 

Stephens, Jacqueline (1979-1990) 
Professor of Education Emerita 

Stratton, Cedric (1965-1993) 

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus 

Winn, William (1957-1971) 
Professor of Mathematics Emeritus 



Officers of Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia 

H. DeanPropst Chancellor 

David S. Spence Executive Vice Chancellor 

Henry G. Neal Executive Secretary 

James E. Cofer Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs /Treasurer 

Thomas E. Daniel Vice Chancellor External Affairs 

Arthur Dunning Vice Chancellor Services and Minority Affairs 

Peter S. Hoff Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs 

James B. Mathews Vice Chancellor Information Technology 

Thomas F. McDonald Vice Chancellor Student Services 

Haskin R. Pounds Vice Chancellor Research and Planning 

Douglas H. Rewerts Vice Chancellor Facilities 

Cathie Mayes Hudson Assistant Vice Chancellor/Planning 

T. Don Davis Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs /Personnel 

Mary Ann Hickman Asst. Vice Chancellor Affirmative Action 

L. Gillis Mac Kinnon, III Asst. Vice Chancellor Facilities 

Thomas E. Mann Asst. Vice Chancellor Facilities 

David M. Morgan Asst. Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs 

Roger Mosshart Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs /Budgets 

Ernest Murphrey Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs /Accounting Systems and Procedures 

J. Pete Silver Asst. Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs 

Joseph H. Szutz Asst. Vice Chancellor Planning 

Kay Miller Assistant to the Chancellor/ Director of System Advancement 

Elizabeth E. Neely Assistant Executive Secretary 

John Sherwood Assistant Executive Secretary 



University System of Georgia 

244 Washington St., S.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30334 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 255 



Officers of Administration 

• \ Burnett President Frank \ Butler Vice President and I 

- \ Butlei Vice President and Dean of Pacuit) 

John i Stegall \ k «• Presklent i<>r Business snd \ li 

Joseph A Buck Vice President for Student Afl 

John A Gehnn ll Executive Directoi Office of College Adi 

William I Megathlin I' lemic and Enrollment Sen 

Joseph V \dams Dean, School of Arts and Sck 

|ames \ RepelU Dean ^ hool oi Health Profession! 

1 orie Roth Assistant t»> the \ k c President 

William P Kelso Assistant to \ U e President tor Student Affairs 

William W Stokes Assistant Dean School of Arts k 

1 loyd Ne* berr) I lead, I >i\ ision of Education 

c ounsil I lead, I Hvision *>t Physical Education 
Car) \ Norsworth) Dean Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education 

kim West Registrar ind I >i rector oi Admissions 

1 \ nn Benson Director, c ounteJing Services 

Roger c ounsil Director, Athletics 

1 orie Durant Director, Career Planning and Placement 

Daniel Harrell Director, Hnance 

Al \ brns Director, Student Activities 

iyung Moo l ee Director, Library Services 

VugUSt Director, Computer and Information Ser 

Robert I Stro/ier Director, Public Relations 

Josephine Murphy Director, Alumni Affairs 

Altred Owens Director. Minontv Affairs and Minority Recruitment 

l.en Ro/ier Director, Plant Operations 

Ellen Shawe Director, Student Financial Aid 

Ellen Struck Director, Personnel 

joann Windeler Director, Business Services 

Institutions of the University System of Georgia 
Universities 

Athens 30602 August 10912 

University oi Georgia — h; B,J,M,S,D Medical College of Georgia - h; A,B,M,D 

Atlanta 3< Stateboro 30460 

C leorgia Institute of Technology — h; B,M,D ( leorgia Southern University - h; 

Atlanta 30303 A,B,M,S,cD 

Georgia State University — A,B,J,M,S,D 

Senior Colleges 

Albany 31705 Marietta 30061 

Albany State College — h; B,M Kennesaw College — A,B 

Americas 31709 Marietta 30060 

Georgia Southwestern College - h; A,B,M S Southern Technical Institute — h; A,B,M 

Augusta 30910 Milledgevilk 31061 

Augusta College - A,B,M,S Georgia College - h; A,B M S 

Carrollton 30118 Morrow 30260 

West Georgia College— h; A,B,M,S Clayton State College— A, B 

Columbus 31993 Savannah 31419 

Columbus College - A,B,M $ Armstrong State College - h; A,B,M 

Dahlonega 30597 Savannah 31404 

North Georgia College - h; A,B,M Savannah State College— h; A,B.M 

Fort Valley 31030 Valdosta 31698 

Fort Valley State College— h; A,B,M Valdosta State College— h; A,B,M,S,cD 



256 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Two-Year Colleges 



Albany 31707 

Darton State College 
Atlanta 30310 

Atlanta Metropolitan College - 
Bainbridge 31717 

Bainbridge College — A 
Barnesville 30204 

Gordon College — h; A 
Brunswick 31523 

Brunswick College — A 
Cochran 31014 

Middle Georgia College — h; A 
Dalton 30720 

Dalton College — A 
Decatur 30034 

Dekalb College— A 



Douglas 31533 

South Georgia College - h; A 
Gainesville 30503 

Gainesville College - A 
Macon 31297 

Macon College - A 
Rome 30163 

Floyd College — A 
Swainsboro 30401 

East Georgia College - A 
Tifton 31793 

Abraham Baldwin Agri. College 
Waycross 31501 

Waycross College — A 



h;A 



h - On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Degrees Awarded: A - Associate: B - Baccalaureate; 

J - Juris Doctor; M - Masters; S - Specialist in Education; D - Doctorate 

cD - Doctorate offered in cooperation with a University System university, with degree awarded by 

the university 



Board of Regents 

Allgood, Thomas F., Sr Tenth 

Anderson, John H., Jr., Chairman State at Large 

Baranco, Juanita Powell Eleventh 

Brown, James E Ninth 

Clark, John Howard Eighth 

Clark, S. William, Jr. M.D First 

Cousins, W. Lamar, M.D Sixth 

Cowan, Joel H State at Large 

Elson, Suzanne G State at Large 

Hand, Elsie P Second 

Leebern, Donald M., Jr State at Large 

McMillan, Elridge W Fifth 

Phillips, Barry, Vice Chairman State at Large 

Rhodes, Edgar L Seventh 

Turner, William B Third 

Williams, Virgil R Fourth 



257 



GLOSSARY OF TERMS 

academic ad\ Isement: students meet with tn .»J\ is,»r ea< h quartei before registenn 
courses (departmental advising for students who have declared i major. Advisement 
Centei foi students w ho h.»\ e not I V\ eJopmentaJ Studies tor students required to take 
Developmental Studios courses) to discuss the i lasses planned tor tin- next iju.i r t»-r 

►ures students are fulfilling requirements foi thru 
academic probation: a status th.it Indicates students art- not maintaining the required 
minimum c IPA I tn- first time a student talk below tin- required ( IPA he or she is p] 
on c lood Standing with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted ( IPA to the required level 
during the next quarter will rvsult in Academic Probation Students on Academic 
probation are not in Good Standing 

academic suspension: status g|ven to students on academic Probation who neither 
achieve the required adjusted c IPA nor earn .it least a 2 o grade point avenge during the 
probationar) period Such students will need to appeal to continue attending toll' 

accredited: a designation that an institution has been evaluated and met i nU-na set by an 

Independent oversight agency. rheCommissiononCollegesol the Southern Ass ociation 

ot C olleges and S. hools rules on accreditation tor Armstrong State College. 

'. ACT-American College Testing: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills 

add (a class): students may sign up for another class after their initial registration 

adjusted GPA: the total honor points earned divided by the total hours attempted, with 
hours and honors points tor repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation (see GPA) 
Includes transfer hours credited to the student's course of study at Armstrong. 

, advance registration: an early registration period, usually about six weeks prior to the 
start ot the quarter, available to currently enrolled students. Also known as pre- 

reg ist rat ion 

area of concentration: a part of the course of study required for the Bachelor of General 
Studies degree; any minor approved by the Board of Regents can be chosen. 

1 Associate of Arts Degree (AA): a program of study lasting two years (full-time that 
completes a student's core curriculum requirements. 

Associate Degree (AD): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a specific 
discipline also known as a career degree, the program of study is designed to prepare 
students for immediate employment (see Associate of Applied Science and Associate of 
Science Degrees. 

Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS): a program of study lasting two years (full- 
time) in a specific discipline (see Associate Degree). 

Associate of Science Degree (AS): a program of study lasting two years (full-time in a 
specific discipline (see Associate Degree) 

auditing: attending a class without receiving credit. Students must be enrolled, receive 
permission from the instructor, declare audit status at the time of registration, and pay 
the tuition and fees for the class. 

baccalaureate: a program of study lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years 
of core curriculum and two years of courses in an area of specialization or major (see 
Bachelor of Arts /Science Degrees) 

Bachelor of Arts Degree (BAVBachelor of Science Degree (BS): a program of study 
lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years of core curriculum and two years of 
courses in an area of specialization or major also referred to as a "Bachelor's Degree" or 
baccalaureate degree. 

Board of Regents: the governing board of the University System of Georgia. 



258 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



certification programs: a course of study, shorter than a degree, leading to specialization 
in a field. Certification programs at the College include teacher certification and radio- 
logical technician certification. 

CHAOS (Communication, Help, Advisement, Orientation and Service): an orientation 
program held during the summer for new students. CHAOS leaders are students who 
have been trained to run these orientation sessions. 

challenge exams: available only for specific courses, usually for students who have 
experience in a certain field. Students passing this type of exam would be exempt from 
certain basic classes. 

CLEP — College Level Examination Program: a standardized test used to determine 
proficiency in a specific area of study. If students score at a certain level on a CLEP test, 
they will receive credit for a class in that subject area In some areas, students will be 
required to pass a higher level course with a minium grade before CLEP credit is given. 

CPC — College Preparatory Curriculum: a high school course of study required of all 
students graduating from high school in the spring of 1988 or later. Course requirements 
include English, math, science, social sciences and foreign languages. CPC requirements 
apply to students with a GED who would have graduated in 1988 or later. 

CPE — College Placement Exam: establishes students' proficiency levels in reading, 
English and math. Based on the scores received, students may be placed in Developmen- 
tal Studies courses. This exam is given to students before their first quarter. 

conditional admission: admission status of students who do not qualify for regular 
admission because of low SAT or ACT scores and /or grade point average (GPA). 

core curriculum: a broad-based course of study required of all students pursuing a 
Bachelor's degree. Courses come from the areas of the humanities, social sciences, and 
math and natural sciences for a total of 90 quarter hours. 

delayed admission: admission status of students who have not attended high school or 
college within the last five years and have earned fewer than 20 transferable credits. These 
applicants are not required to take the SAT or ACT, but will take the College Placement 
exam (CPE). 

Doctorate of Philosophy: a program of study lasting three or more years (full-time in a 
specific area of specialization. This degree is attempted after a Master's degree and 
usually requires a dissertation for completion of the degree. 

drop (a class): students may decide not to take a class they signed up for. 

early admission: a program for high school students who have not completed the 
eleventh grade and who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. High 
school students are allowed to take a maximum of two college courses each quarter. 

exit exams: exams given by a department to graduating seniors to determine minimum 
levels of competency in the major subject area. 

freshman: student who has earned fewer than 45 quarter hours. 

full-time: students taking 12 or more quarter hours of classes. 

GED — General Education Development: an equivalent to the high school diploma; 
students must produce GED scores for admission. 

good standing: a status that indicates students are maintaining the required minimum 
GPA. 

good standing with warning: status given to students whose GPA falls below the 
required GPA for the first tie. 

GPA (Grade Point Average): a point system used to determine the average of all grades 
a student has received for one quarter or for an entire college career. To determine GPA, 
honor points are awarded based on each grade received, which are totaled then divided 
by the number of hours attempted. 



GLOSSARY 259 



graduate work: refers to ill) studies dOM toward • » m.istei 01 PM ) 

jRl- — C.raduate Kemrd I xain: .1 st.md.u di/ed exam th.it tests I erhal ilk! m.ith skills, 

isualh used .is part o! tin- admissions process tor graduate m hool 

honor points: the pomts earned baaed on the lettei grade and quartet hours i redited foi 

\ course I si-J to determine ( IP \ 

ndependenf study: rlamm thai permit students to pursue Individual research and 
reading In thou major field Permission from the department head of the professor is 
equired 

It-State tuition: rateot tuition paid h\ C .eorgia residents Non residents, in spn i.il i ,iscs, 

m.n receive an oul ol state tuition w ah er w huh would allow them to pay the in-state 

tuition rate 

intramurals: organized competitive sports activities coordinated though the Depart' 

ment ot Athletics Open to all interested students 

joint enrollment: a program tor high school students who have completed the eleventh 
grade and have demonstrated outstanding academic potential This program allows 
students to enroll tull-time at the College while remaining on the rolls ot a iocal high 
school. At the end ot their freshman Year students receive their high school diploma 

junior: student who has earned between 90 and 134 quarter hours 

major: an area ot concentrated study in a degree program approved by the Board of 
Regents For a major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours ot 
specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and may require language 
Courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. Total require- 
ments m the major and related fields may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Master's degree (MA, MS, MEd): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a 
specific area o\ specialization. This degree is attempted after a Bachelor's degree and may 
require an in-depth research paper or thesis for completion of the degree. 

minor: an optional course of study chosen in addition to a major consisting of 20 specified 
quarter hours in an area of study different from the students' major. Minors are approved 
bv the Board of Regents. 

out-of-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by students who are not legal residents of 
Georgia. 

part-time: students taking fewer than 12 quarter hours of classes. 

pre-professional programs: courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalaureate 
programs not offered among degree programs here at the College, such as business, 
engineering, forestry, pharmacy and physical therapy Also includes study appropriate 
for dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary medicine and other professional fields. 

pre-registration: an early registration period available to currently enrolled students. 
Also known as advance registration. 

prerequisite: a course required before a more advanced course may be taken. Prerequi- 
sites are listed in the catalog under course descriptions. 

programs of study: refers to specific majors or areas of study, usually leading to a degree, 
that are offered by the College. 

provisional admission: admission status of students who have not completed the college 
prep curriculum (CPC) upon entering the College. College level courses to fill these 
deficiencies must be taken immediately (See CPC). 

quarter hours: the approximate number of hours spent each week in a particular class. 
Also used to determine the total number of hours students register for. 



260 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



quarter system: a school term based on approximately ten weeks, with four sessions per 

year. 

readmission: students who have attended Armstrong in the past, but have not taken 

classes at the College for one or more quarters, not including summer quarter. 

Regents' exam: an exam measuring minimum writing and reading skills given to all 
students in the university System of Georgia schools seeking a Bachelor's degree. This 
exam is required after a student has completed 5 quarter hours. 

registration: a time to enroll for specific classes for the next quarter. Regular registration 
is held each quarter the day before classes begin. 

regular admission: admission status for students who, upon entrance to the College, 
have the required standardized test scores (SAT Verbal 380/SAT Math 380 or ACT 
English 20/ACT Math 18), required grade point average (2.0), have completed the 
required college prep curriculum (see CPC), and have not been out of high school more 
than four Years. This status will be awarded to other students upon completing 30 hours 
of college credit with a 2.0 grade point average. 

residency: students are considered residents of Georgia if they have lived in Georgia at 
least one year and consider Georgia their home. Students who have not lived in Georgia 
for one year or who are just coming to Georgia for their education and plan to move back 
to another state after graduation are not considered residents. 

ROTC — Reserve Officer Training Corps: a curriculum available to students at Arm- 
strong and Savannah State that qualifies students for a commission as an officer in the US 
Army, Army Reserves, US Navy, Naval Reserves or US National Guard after graduation. 

SAT — Scholastic Aptitude Test: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills. 
Scores are used to determine admission status for freshmen. 

semester system: a school term based on approximately 15 weeks, including two regular 
sessions each year plus a short summer session. 

senior: students who has earned 135 or ore quarter hours. 

short course: a continuing education course that does not award college credit though it 
may award continuing education units. 

sophomore: students who has earned between 45 and 89 quarter hours. 

transcript: an official record of all courses a student has taken at a particular institution. 
An official transcript is a transcript sent directly from one institution to another; a student 
copy is a transcript issued to students. 

transfer: students seeking admission who have previously been enrolled at another 
institution of higher education. 

transfer credit: credit for courses taken at another institution. Granting credit will be 
considered only for course work from an accredited institution. 

transient: admission status of students currently enrolled at another institution applying 
for temporary admission to Armstrong for one quarter. Students must be in good 
standing at their home college, have written permission from their dean or registrar to 
take specific courses at Armstrong which will be transferred to their home institution. 

University System of Georgia: the overall system of public higher education in Georgia, 
comprised of 5 universities, 14 senior colleges and 15 junior colleges. 
withdrawal: the act of dropping a class, the date of the withdrawal determining any 
grade penalty; or the act of dropping out of school completely. 



261 



INDEX 



\i.uirmu -\d\ M-im-nl 

fccademk c omputing ( enta - 1 1 

fccadcmk i lonoi Sex letiea 19 

Acedemk P rogress 
taedemk Standing 
Accelerated Admission Program 

editations 1 1 

Administrate e Officers 

Admission! 

i onditkmsl 

Delayed n 

Bart) H 

GED n 

Genua] Information ~4 

Graduate 76 

International Students 31 

foint Enrollment 31 

Over 62 31 

Policies 24 

Provisional 25 

Readmission 29 

Regular 24 

Special Categories 31 

Transfer Students 28 

Transient Students 30 

Veterans 32 

Vocational Rehabilitation 32 

Admission Requirements to Specific 

Programs 32 

Art & Music 32 

Dental Hygiene 36 

Dental Hygiene Education 37 

Health Science 39 

Medical Technology 39 

Nursing (Associate) 33 

Nursing (Baccalaureate) 34 

Radiologic Technologies 38 

RespiratoryTherapy 37 

Teacher Education 207 

Adults Back to College Program 21 

Advancement 12 

Alumnni Affairs 12 

Development 13 

ASC Foundation 13 

Public Relations 12 

Advisement 54 

Advisement Center 21 

Alumni Association 13 

Application Fee 43 

Art & Music Department 83 

Arts and Sciences (School of) 79 

ASC 101 234 

Associate Degree 

General Requirements 67 

Athletics 19 

Attendance 56 

Auditing 58 

Baccalaureate Degree 

General Requirements 67 



Biolog) I ><-p.ir liin-nl 

Bookstore 






Brunswfc u enta 

c slendai (Academic I Li 

■ r Planning 
c hemistry I tepertmenl 
t lassitu stion of Studenti 
clubs Organizations, Studenti 18 

c o.ist.ii ( leorgis c entei t»>r 

c ontinuing Education 16 

College Preparator) ( urricuhun 
Collegiate Placemen! Examination 

<. ontinuing Education 
c ooperative Education Programs 14 

c ore Curriculum Reauirementi 

Counseling C enter 

c ourst.- Omerings 

Accounting (SSC) 221 

Anthropology \h">> 

Art 

Astronomy 1(W 

Biology 

Botany 100 

Business Administration (SSC) 221 

Chemistry 105 

Computer Science 159 

Criminal Justice 117 

Dental Hygiene 184 

Developmental Studies 235 

Drama/Speech 141 

Economics 165 

Education 

Business 221 

EDN 215 

Exceptional Children 218 

Library Media /Science 220 

Engineering 108 

English 143 

Film 146 

French 147 

Geography 127 

Geology 109 

German 148 

Health Education 190 

Health Science 189 

History 128 

Journalism 151 

Latin 149 

Library Media 220 

Library Science 221 

Linguistics 131 

Mathematics 156 

Medical Technology 193 

Meteorology 110 

Military Science 238 

Music 90 

Naval ROTC 242 

Nursing 
Associate Degree (NUR) 175 



262 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Baccalaureate Degree (BSN) 180 

Oceanography 110 

Office Administration (SSC) 222 

Philosophy 152 

Physical Education 226 

Physical Science 109 

Physics 110 

Political Science 120 

Psychology 166 

Public Administration 120 

Public History 135 

RadiologicTechnologies 196 

Reading Skills 235 

RespiratoryTherapy 202 

Sociology 169 

Spanish 149 

Zoology 100 

Courses 

Auditing 58 

Course Load 54 

Dropping 57 

Lettering System for 68 

Numbering System for 68 

Overload 54 

Repeating 57 

Withdrawing from College 7 58 

Credit by Examination 27 

Criminal Justice Training Center 16 

Cross Enrollment 16 

Cultural Opportunities 19 

Dean's List 56 

Degree Programs Offered 6, 69 

Degree Programs (Categories) 6, 69 

Cooperative 14 

Division of Education 70 

Division of Physical Education 

and Athletics 70 

Dual-Degree 14 

Four-Year 13 

Pre-Professional 13 

School of Arts and Sciences 69 

School of Health Professions 70 

Two- Year 13 

Degree Requirements 62 

Dental Hygiene Department 182 

Development 13 

Developmental Studies Department 234 

Disabilities, Students with 20 

Dismissal (Academic) 57 

Drop/ Add 57 

Dual Degree Programs 14 

Education, Division of 206 

Elderhostel 20 

Engineering Transfer Program 14 

English Placement 66 

Evening Courses 14 

Expenses (Student) 42 

Faculty Roster 246 

Fees 43 

Financial Aid 45 



Application Procedure 46 

Employment 48 

Government Benefits 49 

Grants 47 

Loans 47 

Scholarships 48 

Transfer Students 47 

Veterans Benefits 50 

Financial Obligations 45 

Food Service 18, 43 

Freshman Experience (ASC 101)) 234 

General Studies 81 

Glossary 257 

Goals for Core Curriculum 64 

Government Benefits 49 

Government Department Ill 

Grade Appeals 55 

Grade Reports 55 

Graduate Studies, College of 73 

Admission 76 

Application Procedure 76 

Assistantships ". 76 

Off-Campus Centers 77 

Programs 75 

Purpose 74 

Health Professions (School of) 171 

Health Science Program 187 

HistoryDepartment 124 

History /Government State Requirements ...67 

History of the College 11 

Honor Code 58 

Honors 56 

Housing 43 

Intercollegiate Athletic Program 19 

International Students 31 

Intramurals 19 

Inventories of Interest 20 

Lane Library 21 

Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 

Arts Department 137 

Lettering System for Courses 68 

Library Media Program 220 

Library Science Courses 221 

Library Services 21 

Location of the College 11 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department 153 

Mathematics Placement 66 

Math Tutorial Center 21 

Medical Technology Program 191 

Medical Withdrawals 58 

Military Experience, Credit for 27 

Military Science Program 236 

Minority Advisement Program 20 

Naval Science Program 240 

Notice of Fee Change 42 

Numbering System for Courses 68 

Nursing Department (Associate) 173 

Nursing Department (Baccalaureate) 176 

Off-Campus Courses 14 



INDEX 



263 



Orientation I s 

Parking Regulations 
Physical \ ducation Division 
Physios! 1 ducation Requirement! 

Placemenl s fr^ k tt 
Placemenl Q nglish and 

Mathemati< i) 
Political Science 120 

Pre rrofcattonil Programs 1 \ 

Probation I tcademk I 
Pro* ksional Admission 
E*ublk Administration 120 

Public Relations 12 

Purpose oi the College ' l) 

Radiation rherap) rechnology 

Radiologic rechnologies Program 194 

Reading I ab 21 

Readmission 29 

Refunds 45 

Regents' Engine erin g transfer 

nrogram 14, 27 

Regenti resting Program 

Regional Criminal Justice 

I rainingCentef ir> 

Regi st r a tion 

I ate Fee 44 

Repeating Courses 57 

Residence Life 18 

Residency Reclassification 43 

Residency Requirements 42 

Respiratory Therapy Department 200 



s.itist.i. ror) v ademk Progress 

Savannah 11 

Sv holarships 

short ( owrses 

Sot i.ii and Behavioral s > lent at 

Statement ol Purpose i<> 

Student 

( loi ernmenl Assoi latioti i^ 

Housing 4^ 

Banizattoni 18 

Publications N 

Students With Disabilities 20 

Stud) 1 oad M 

Suspension (Academk I 
1 esting 

( ollegiate Placemenl I uunination 2^ 

( redil in Examination 

English and Mathematics 
Placemenl I ests 

Regents' resting Program 

Transfer Students 

Financial Aid 

Requirements of Applicants 

Transient Students 30 

Tuition 42 

Veterans 

Admissions 

Financial Aid 50 

Vocational Rehabilitation 32 

Withdrawals (Medical) 58 

Withdrawing from College 58 

Writing Center 21 



IB I 



Armstrong State College 



Campus Guid 



Directory 


l 


Administration Building 


2 


Victor Hall 


2A 


Victor Hall Annex 


3 


Gamble Hall 


4 


Jenkins Hall 


5 


Lane Library 


6 


Memorial Center Annex 


7 


Memorial College Center 


8 


Hawes Hall 


8A 


Hawes Hall Annex 


9 


SolmsHall 


10 


Information & Public Safety 


11 


Fine Arts Center 


12 


Health Professions Building 


13 


Health & Physical Education Building 




Plant Operations 




Criminal Justice Training Center 




Military Science 


14 


Athletic Fields/Tennis Courts 


15 


Student /Visitor Parking 


16 


Residence Center 


17 


Offices across Abercom 


18 


Southside Community Park 




Academic & Enrollment Services 1 

Admissions 1 

Advisement Center 5 

Allied Health 12 

Alumni Affairs 1 

Art Dept 11 

Athletic Dept 13 

Athletic Fields /Tennis Courts 14 

Audio Visual Services 5 

Biology Dept. & Labs 8 

Bookstore 6 

Business & Finance Office 1 

Cafeteria 7 

Career Planning 7 

Cashier 1 

Center for Economic Education 2 

Central Supply/Receiving 13 

Chemistry, Physics, tc 

Engineering Dept. & Labs 9 

Coastal Georgia Center for 

Continuing Education 11 

College Advancement 1 

Computer & Information Services 

Academic 6 

Administrative 4 

Computer Science Dept 8 

Counseling 7 

Criminal Justice 9 

Criminal Justice Training Center 13 

Dean, Academic & 

Enrollment Services 1 

Dean, School of Arts & Sciences 2 

Dean, Health Professions 12 

Dental Hygiene Dept. & Clinic 12 

Development 1 

Developmental Studies 6 

Education Dept 2 

Elderhostel 7 

Engineering Studies 9 

English Dept 3 

Faculty Dining Room/Lounge 7 

Financial Aid 1 

Fine Arts Auditorium 11 

Fine Arts Gallery 11 

Foundation 1 

Game Room 7 

Georgia Learning Resources System 

(GLRS) 2 



Government Dept 

Graduate Office 

Graphics 

Gymnasium/Weight Room 

Health Professions Auditorium . 

Health Science Dept 

History Dept 

Housing 

Intramurals 

Jenkins Auditorium 

Languages, Literature, 4 

Dramatic Arts Dept 

Library 

Mailroom 

Masquers Productions 

Mathematics Dept 

Medical Technology Dept 

Military Science Dept 

Minority Affairs 

Music Dept 

Nursing Dept. 

Associate & Baccalaureate 

Physical Education Dept , 

Physics , 

Plant Operations , 

Political Science 

Pool 

Presidenf s Dining Room 

President 

Psychology Dept 

Public Relations 

Public Safety 

Radiologic Technologies Dept. .. 



I 



Residence Center 

Respiratory Therapy Dept 

ROTC —Army 

Speech Clinic 

Student Activities 

Student Affairs 

Student Government/Organizations . 

Student Parking 

Student Publications 

Studio "A" 

Tutorial Labs: Math & Reading J 

Veterans Affairs 

Vice President/Dean of Faculty 

Writing Center 




Campus map courtesy of the 
Office Of Public Relations 

Public Information — 927-5211 
Admissions Information — 927-5277 
Toll free — 1-800-633-2349 



' Downtown Abercom Street (G A 204) 1-95 ■ 



17 



Jhere to Write or Call 



re is a central mail room on campus Specific information may be obtained by writing to the 

•s listed ' I ng 

istrong State College 
135 Abercorn Street In Georgia 

A 31419 1997 (outside Chatham County) Call 1-800-633-2349 



ISSION 
BCtor of Admissions 
'-5277 

VISEMENT 
visement Center 
1-5465 



UMNI 

imm Affairs. Office of College 
Vdvancement 
5264 

HLETICS 

ector of Athletics 

,-5336 

JJSINESS MATTERS 

■|:e President for Business & Finance 

J7-5255 

(\REER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 
Sector of Career Planning 

and Placement 

17-5269 

UTALOG 

rector of Admissions 
17-5277 

DNTINUING EDUCATION 
Dastal Georgia Center for 
Continuing Education 
>7-5322 

OUNSELING 
irector of Counseling 
27-5269 

INANCIAL AID. GRANTS. LOANS, 
WORK-STUDY ELIGIBILITY 
irector of Student Financial Aid 
27-5272 

iENERAL ACADEMIC AND 
FACULTY MATTERS 
ice President and Dean of Faculty 
27-5261 

ilFTS. GRANTS & BEQUESTS 
)ffice of College Advancement 
27-5263 

GRADUATE STUDY 
associate Graduate Dean 
27-5377 



HOUSING 
Director of Housing 
927 5269 

OFFICE OF MINORITY AFFAIRS 
Director of Minority Recruitment 
927 5252 

SECURITY 
Campus Police 
927 5236 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Certification Officer 
927-5294 

TESTING 

Division of Student Affairs 

927-5269 

TRANSCRIPTS 
Office of the Registrar 
927-5275 

TUITION, PAYMENT OF BILLS. REFUNDS 
Vice President for Business & Finance 
927-5255 



Special Notice 

The statements set forth in this Catalog are for 
information purposes only and should not be 
construed as the basis of a contract between a 
student and this institution. 

While the provisions of the Catalog will generally 
be applied as stated. Armstrong State College 
reserves the right to change any provision listed 
in this Catalog, including but not limited to aca- 
demic requirements for graduation, without actual 
notice to individual students. Every effort will be 
made to keep students advised of any such 
changes. Information on changes will be avail- 
able in the Offices of the Registrar, the Vice 
President of Student Affairs, and the academic 
deans. It is especially important that students 
note that it is their responsibility to keep them- 
selves apprised of current graduation 
requirements for their particular degree pro- 
gram. 

Armstrong State College is an affirmative action 
equal opportunity education institution and does 
not discriminate on the basis of sex. race. age. 
religion, disability, or national origin in employ- 
ment, admissions, or activities. 



Armstronq 
State a 
College